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61.  Strain Engineering at Heterointerfaces: Application to an Iron Pnictide Superconductor, Cobalt-Doped BaFe2As2.LinkIT
Sato H, Hiramatsu H, Kamiya T, Hosono H
ACS applied materials & interfaces, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

62.  Rapid, Ultrasensitive, and Quantitative Detection of SARS-CoV-2 Using Antisense Oligonucleotides Directed Electrochemical Biosensor Chip.LinkIT
Alafeef M, Dighe K, Moitra P, Pan D
ACS nano, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

63.  Platelet glycoprotein Ib alpha chain as a putative therapeutic target for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a Mendelian randomization study.LinkIT
Luo S, Clarke S, Ramanan A, Thompson SD, Langefeld CD, Marion MC, Grom AA, Schooling CM, Gaunt TR, Au Yeung SL, Zheng J
Arthritis & rheumatology (Hoboken, N.J.), 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

64.  Failure patterns and prognostic factors for cervical node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy era.LinkIT
Wu Z, Wang L, Xie DH, Lv SW, Su Y, Shi YR
Asia-Pacific journal of clinical oncology Asia Pac J Clin Oncol Failure patterns and prognostic factors for cervical node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy era. 10.1111/ajco.13475 To evaluate the failure patterns and prognostic factors in patients with cervical node-negative nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) era. Patients with cervical node-negative NPC treated with IMRT at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between February 2001 and December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The failure patterns, prognostic factors, and efficacy of additional chemotherapy were assessed. The median follow-up time was 78 months for 298 patients. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), nodal recurrence-free survival (NRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), failure-free survival (FFS), and overall survival (OS) were 95.2%, 99.3%, 94.8%, 89.8%, and 92.9%, respectively. The rate of treatment failure remained high in patients with T4 disease (35.4%, 17/48), including eight of local recurrence, two of nodal recurrence, and seven of distant metastasis. Multivariate analyses showed that the primary gross tumor volume (GTVp) was significantly associated with LRFS, DMFS, FFS, and OS. Subgroup analysis revealed that patients with GTVp ? 42.5 cc had better 5-year LRFS (98.7% vs 81.4%, P < .001), 5-year DMFS (97.8% vs 82.5%, P < .001), 5-year FFS (96.1% vs 65.4%, P < .001), and 5-year OS (96.6% vs 78.2%, P < .001) than patients with GTVp > 42.5 cc. However, additional chemotherapy showed no significant survival benefit in stratification analysis. Cervical node-negative NPC has a good prognosis in the IMRT era, and the primary tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor. Further exploration is needed to determine the optimal treatment strategy for patients with a high tumor burden. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Wu Zheng Z https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6159-6352 Department of Radiation Oncology, Hunan Cancer Hospital and The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, China. Wang Lei L VIP Region, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Xie De-Huan DH Department of Radiation Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Lv Shao-Wen SW Department of Radiation Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Su Yong Y Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, China. Shi Ying-Rui YR Department of Radiation Oncology, Hunan Cancer Hospital and The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Xiangya School of Medicine, Central South University, Changsha, China. eng Journal Article 2020 10 20 Australia Asia Pac J Clin Oncol 101241430 1743-7555 IM chemotherapy intensity-modulated radiotherapy lymph node nasopharyngeal neoplasm prognosis 2020 04 21 2020 09 13 2020 10 20 12 16 2020 10 21 6 0 2020 10 21 6 0 aheadofprint 33079493 10.1111/ajco.13475 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>65.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Postoperative radiotherapy improves overall survival in patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Wang X, Zhang L, Luo J, Jin K, Yang Z, Meng J, Zhang X, Zhang Z, Shao Z, Guo X, Chen X, Yu X<br><font color=gray><i>Asia-Pacific journal of clinical oncology Asia Pac J Clin Oncol Postoperative radiotherapy improves overall survival in patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast. 10.1111/ajco.13466 Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the breast (PSCCB) is a rare clinical classification of breast tumors. Little is known about its clinicopathological features, prognosis and potential therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the breast. We retrospectively analyzed patients diagnosed with PSCCB in our center. All pathological slides were reviewed by an experienced pathologist to confirm the diagnosis. Furthermore, we searched the public database for patients with SCC of the breast. Then, we analyzed the clinicopathological features, treatment methods and patient outcomes. We identified 14 patients with primary SCC of the breast in our center. Additionally, 739 patients with SCC of the breast from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database were diagnosed between 1975 and 2016. Only 453 patients who underwent surgery were included in this study. Patients from the SEER database had a more advanced tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage than patients from our center. The median overall survival (OS) of all patients was 104 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 87.2-120.8 months), and the 5-year OS was 60.8% (95% CI, 56.1%-65.5%). Most of the patients (58%) tested negative for hormonal receptor expression. Multivariate analysis showed that PORT was an independent prognostic factor for OS. The results of our study demonstrate that SCC of the breast presents aggressive behavior with unique clinical characteristics. PORT improved OS significantly in patients with SCC of the breast. Longer-term studies are needed to confirm our findings. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Wang Xuanyi X Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Zhang Li L Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Luo Jurui J Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Jin Kairui K Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Yang Zhaozhi Z Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Meng Jin J Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Zhang Xiaomeng X Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Zhang Zhen Z Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Shao Zhimin Z Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Breast Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Guo Xiaomao X Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Chen Xingxing X Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Yu Xiaoli X https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1247-7896 Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, Shanghai, China. eng 81602668 National Natural Science Foundation of China Journal Article 2020 10 20 Australia Asia Pac J Clin Oncol 101241430 1743-7555 IM prognosis radiotherapy squamous cell carcinoma of the breast 2019 11 13 2020 07 24 2020 09 05 2020 10 20 12 16 2020 10 21 6 0 2020 10 21 6 0 aheadofprint 33079490 10.1111/ajco.13466 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>66.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Sentinel lymph node biopsy in acral melanoma: A Korean single-center experience with 107 patients (2006-2018).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Sohng C, Sim HB, Kim JY, Lim Y, Han MH, Lee H, Ahn BC, Huh S, Lee SJ<br><font color=gray><i>Asia-Pacific journal of clinical oncology Asia Pac J Clin Oncol Sentinel lymph node biopsy in acral melanoma: A Korean single-center experience with 107 patients (2006-2018). 10.1111/ajco.13425 Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) of primary cutaneous melanoma as an important staging method has not been popularly undertaken in Korea and only a few studies with small patient numbers have been published. We examined the clinical feasibility and overall outcomes of SLNB in acral melanoma (AM) of Korean in Kyungpook National University Hospital (KNUH) over the past 13 years. SLNB in AM patients during 2006-2018 were analyzed retrospectively for sentinel lymph node (SLN) harvesting rate, positivity rate, positivity-relevant overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), and its side effects. A total of 109 AM patients who underwent SLNB were enrolled. Harvested nodes were identified from 107 patients and SLN harvesting rate was 98.2%. The mean Breslow thickness (±standard deviation) was 3.38 ± 3.03 mm, and the proportion of ulcerated melanomas was 64%. Twenty-two (20.6%) had a tumor-positive SLN and, among them, 82% (18/22) underwent immediate complete lymph node dissection (CLND). The metastasis-positive nodal basin after CLND was detected in 16.7% of cases (3/18). Tumor-negative SLN cohorts showed significantly better OS and DFS than tumor-positive ones (P = 0.006 and P < 0.001 for each). Two side effects, one seroma and one lymphocele, were observed without major sequelae. SLNB, crucial management of melanoma, proved its efficacy to predict patients' prognosis and could be performed successfully and safely in Korean AM patients by interdisciplinary cooperation between dermatology and other surgical departments. SLN(-) showed significantly better OS and DFS than SLN(+). Significant risk factors for DFS were Breslow thickness, the presence of ulceration and the presence of SLN metastasis. SLNB should be encouraged in order to stage melanoma accurately and direct the proper management in Korean AM. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd. Sohng Chihyeon C https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1452-7896 Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. Sim Hyun Bo HB Park and Lee Dermatologic Clinic, Daegu, South Korea. Kim Jun Young JY https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2999-1018 Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. Lim Yangsoo Y Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. Han Man Hoon MH https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8856-553X Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. Lee Hoseok H Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. Ahn Byeong-Cheol BC Department of Dermatology, Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. Huh Seung S https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0275-4960 Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. Lee Seok-Jong SJ https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6131-632X Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, South Korea. eng Journal Article 2020 10 20 Australia Asia Pac J Clin Oncol 101241430 1743-7555 IM Korean acral melanoma malignant melanoma prognosis sentinel lymph node biopsy survival 2019 10 30 2020 06 17 2020 06 18 2020 10 20 12 15 2020 10 21 6 0 2020 10 21 6 0 aheadofprint 33079454 10.1111/ajco.13425 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>67.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The prognostic significance of the treatment response of regional lymph nodes and the refinement of the current TNM staging system in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Cui J, Zhang L, Yang L, Zhu YL, Fang H, Chen B, Ning Y, Zhang HZ<br><font color=gray><i>Cancer medicine Cancer Med The prognostic significance of the treatment response of regional lymph nodes and the refinement of the current TNM staging system in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. 10.1002/cam4.3553 The current TNM staging system uses the same category definitions for both rectal cancer patients with and without neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). However, ypTNM stage, especially ypN stage does not predict patient survival after NCRT well. Whether tumor regression in lymph nodes (LRG) may improve the prediction has not been well studied. In total, 358 patients with rectal cancer who received NCRT followed by radical resection were recruited from 2004 to 2015, and the median follow-up time was 57.5 months. The main outcome measure was disease-free survival (DFS). In univariate analysis, factors associated with DFS were ypT stage, ypN stage, number of negative lymph nodes (NLN), lymph node ratio (LNR), tumor regression grade (TRG), M-TTRG (modified ypT stage by combining ypT stage and TRG), maximum LRG (LRGmax), sum score of LRG (LRGsum), LRG ratio (average value of LRGsum), and M-NLRG (modified ypN stage by combining LRGmax and LNR). In the multivariate Cox regression analysis, M-TTRG and M-NLRG (p < 0.001 and p = 0.030, respectively) were significantly associated with DFS. The estimated 5-year DFS rates were 86.6%, 60.3%, and 36.4% for patients with M-NLRG-0, M-NLRG-1, and M-NLRG-2, respectively (p < 0.001). A significant difference in survival was observed among patients with NCRT after incorporating TRG and LRG simultaneously into the current ypTNM staging system (p < 0.001). LRG was an important prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients treated with NCRT and could refine the ypTNM staging system. The modified ypTNM staging system in combination with LRGmax, LNR, and TRG could improve the DFS prediction in each subset of patients. © 2020 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Cui Jian J Department of Colorectal Surgery and State Key Lab of Molecular Oncology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Zhang Lin L Department of Colorectal Surgery and State Key Lab of Molecular Oncology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Yang Lin L Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Zhu Yue-Lu YL https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2849-4132 Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Fang Hui H Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Chen Bo B Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. Ning Yi Y Meinian Public Health Institute, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing, China. Zhang Hai-Zeng HZ https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1433-3482 Department of Colorectal Surgery and State Key Lab of Molecular Oncology, National Cancer Center/National Clinical Research Center for Cancer/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. eng 2016-I2M-1-007 Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences 81972317 National Natural Science Foundation of China Journal Article 2020 10 20 United States Cancer Med 101595310 2045-7634 IM 2020 04 03 2020 09 12 2020 09 12 2020 10 20 12 15 2020 10 21 6 0 2020 10 21 6 0 aheadofprint 33079470 10.1002/cam4.3553 References, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>68.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Cadmium Isotopic Fractionation in the Soil-Plant System during Repeated Phytoextraction with a Cadmium Hyperaccumulating Plant Species.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Zhou JW, Li Z, Liu MS, Yu HM, Wu LH, Huang F, Luo YM, Christie P<br><font color=gray><i>Environmental science & technology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>69.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Covalent Immobilization of <i>N</i>-Acetylcysteine on a Polyvinyl Chloride Substrate Prevents Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Yang S, Tran C, Whiteley GS, Glasbey T, Kriel FH, McKenzie DR, Manos J, Das T<br><font color=gray><i>Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>70.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Relationship between chewing features and body mass index in young adolescents.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Idris G, Smith C, Galland B, Taylor R, Robertson CJ, Bennani H, Farella M<br><font color=gray><i>Pediatric obesity Pediatr Obes Relationship between chewing features and body mass index in young adolescents. e12743 10.1111/ijpo.12743 Behavioural aspects of chewing may influence food intake, nutritional status and in turn body weight. The current study aimed to study chewing features in adolescents as they naturally occur in home-based settings, and to test for a possible association with weight status. Forty-two adolescents (15.3?±?1.3?years) were recruited (21 with healthy-weight/21 with overweight). Using a smartphone-assisted wearable electromyographic device, the chewing features of each participant were assessed over one evening, including the evening meal, in their natural home setting. The mean (±SD) for chewing pace was 1.53?±?0.22?Hz, chewing power 30.1%?±?4.8%, number of chewing episodes 63.1?±?36.7 and chewing time 11.0?±?7.7?minutes. The chewing pace of the group with overweight was slower than that of healthy weight (-0.20?Hz; 95% CI, -0.06 to -0.33; P?= .005) while their chewing time was shorter (-4.9?minutes; 95% CI, 0.2-9.7; P?= .044). A significant negative correlation was observed between BMI z-score and chewing pace (R = -.41; P?= .007), and between BMI z-score and chewing time (R = -0.32; P = .039). The current study suggests that adolescents who are overweight eat at a slower pace for a shorter period of time than their counterparts who are a healthy weight. This unexpected finding based on objective data appears to conflict with existing questionnaire findings but provides impetus for further work testing the effectiveness of changing eating behaviour as a weight-management intervention in youth. © 2020 World Obesity Federation. Idris Ghassan G https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8654-6562 Sir John Walsh Research Institute, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Queensland Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Smith Claire C Department of Women's and Children's Health, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Galland Barbara B Department of Women's and Children's Health, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Taylor Rachael R https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9516-2253 Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Robertson Christopher J CJ Sir John Walsh Research Institute, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Bennani Hamza H Department of Computer Science, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Farella Mauro M Sir John Walsh Research Institute, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. eng 3911/2018 Cure Kids FULLER Scholarship/DClinDent17 Sir John Walsh Research Insititute, Univeristy of Otago Journal Article 2020 10 20 England Pediatr Obes 101572033 2047-6302 IM electromyography feeding behaviour mastication obesity overweight wearable electronic devices 2020 05 17 2020 09 07 2020 10 05 2020 10 20 12 16 2020 10 21 6 0 2020 10 21 6 0 aheadofprint 33079494 10.1111/ijpo.12743 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=p.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=1><img 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align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=11><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=12><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=13><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=14><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=15><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=16><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>«</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=1>1</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center>7</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=11>11</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=12>12</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=13>13</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=14>14</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=15>15</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=16>16</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=negative&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>