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Scientific:
   Argyreia nervosa (elephant creeper) 

Synonyms:
   Argyreia nervosa (elephant creeper) 
   Argyreia speciosa 
   Convolvulus nervosus (elephant creeper) 
   Convolvulus speciosus (elephant creeper) 
   Ipomoea speciosa 
   Lettsomia nervosa 
   Rivea nervosa 

Broader Terms:
   Argyreia 
   Convolvulus (Field bindweed) 
   Rivea 
   Solanales 
   elephant 
 
 
Latest Articles on elephant creeper from uBioRSS
Recreational use of D-lysergamide from the seeds of Argyreia nervosa, Ipomo... - PubMed: species
Elephant Creeper, Argyreia nervosa....Bạc Thau, Thảo Bạc tím .....#5 - PLANT [directory] ?? Photo Pool


External Resources:



51.  Cholinergic dysfunction in the dorsal striatum promotes habit formation and maladaptive eating.LinkIT
Favier M, Janickova H, Justo D, Kljakic O, Runtz L, Natsheh JY, Pascoal TA, Germann J, Gallino D, Kang JI, Meng XQ, Antinora C, Raulic S, Jacobsen JP, Moquin L, Vigneault E, Gratton A, Caron MG, Duriez P, Brandon MP, Neto PR, Chakravarty MM, Herzallah MM, Gorwood P, Prado MA, Prado VF, El Mestikawy S
The Journal of clinical investigation, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

52.  Hippocampal volume, function, and related molecular activity in anorexia nervosa: A scoping review.LinkIT
Keeler J, Patsalos O, Thuret S, Ehrlich S, Tchanturia K, Himmerich H, Treasure J
Expert review of clinical pharmacology, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

53.  A cross-sectional study of gastrointestinal symptoms, depressive symptoms and trait anxiety in young adults.LinkIT
Söderquist F, Syk M, Just D, Kurbalija Novicic Z, Rasmusson AJ, Hellström PM, Ramklint M, Cunningham JL
BMC psychiatry, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

54.  Personalized networks of eating disorder symptoms predicting eating disorder outcomes and remission.LinkIT
Levinson CA, Cash E, Welch K, Epskamp S, Hunt RA, Williams BM, Keshishian AC, Spoor SP
The International journal of eating disorders Int J Eat Disord Personalized networks of eating disorder symptoms predicting eating disorder outcomes and remission. 10.1002/eat.23398 Enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-E) is one of the primary evidence-based treatments for adults with eating disorders (EDs). However, up to 50% of individuals do not respond to CBT-E, likely because of the high heterogeneity present even within similar diagnoses. This high heterogeneity, especially in regard to presenting pathology, makes it difficult to develop a treatment based "on averages" and for clinicians to accurately pinpoint which symptoms should be targeted in treatment. As such, new models based at both the group, and individual level, are needed to more accurately refine targets for personalized evidence-based treatments that can lead to full remission. The current study (Expected N = 120 anorexia nervosa, atypical anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa) will build both group and individual longitudinal models of ED behaviors, cognitions, affect, and physiology. We will collect data for 30?days utilizing a mobile application to assess behaviors, cognition, and affect and a sensor wristband that assesses physiology (heart rate, acceleration). We will also collect outcome data at 1- and 6-month follow-ups to assess ED outcomes and remission status. These data will allow for identification of "on average" and "individual" targets that maintain ED pathology and test if these targets predict outcomes, including ED remission. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Levinson Cheri A CA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8098-6943 Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Cash Elizabeth E School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Welch Karla K Department of Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Epskamp Sacha S Department of Psychological Methods and Psychometrics, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Hunt Rowan A RA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7626-7049 Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Williams Brenna M BM https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3938-9610 Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Keshishian Ani C AC Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Spoor Samantha P SP Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. eng 1R15MH121445-01 MH NIMH NIH HHS United States Journal Article 2020 11 11 United States Int J Eat Disord 8111226 0276-3478 IM eating disorders longitudinal modeling network analysis physiology remission 2020 08 18 2020 10 14 2020 10 14 2020 11 12 5 48 2020 11 13 6 0 2020 11 13 6 0 aheadofprint 33179347 10.1002/eat.23398 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>55.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Evaluation of spontaneous regional brain activity in weight-recovered anorexia nervosa.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Seidel M, Geisler D, Borchardt V, King JA, Bernardoni F, Jaite C, Roessner V, Calhoun V, Walter M, Ehrlich S<br><font color=gray><i>Translational psychiatry, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>56.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Introduction of family-based treatment to Japan with adaptations to optimize the cultural acceptability and advance current traditional treatments of adolescent anorexia nervosa.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Iguchi T, Miyawaki D, Harada T, Ogiwara K<br><font color=gray><i>The International journal of eating disorders Int J Eat Disord Introduction of family-based treatment to Japan with adaptations to optimize the cultural acceptability and advance current traditional treatments of adolescent anorexia nervosa. 10.1002/eat.23405 Given the lack of clear consensus on effective treatment models for adolescent anorexia nervosa in Japan, treatment programs offered to this population vary widely between treatment facilities with limited testing of outcomes. Importantly, families have traditionally been left out of the core treatment process, as they are commonly viewed as being powerless in renourishing their child. The purpose of this commentary was to report the authors' preliminary efforts to introduce and implement family-based treatment (FBT) in Japan so that, on par with international standards of practice, FBT may become the first-line treatment option for Japanese families. This commentary will describe the systemic and cultural barriers which posed as challenges in introducing FBT to Japan in its manualized standard format and how these were addressed by introducing FBT during the patient's hospital admission and by assigning the father with a role which resembles the traditional gender role within the Japanese family culture. Authors have thus far observed that these adaptations led to increased accessibility of FBT and improved outcomes such as reduced number of hospitalizations and shorter time taken to reach 85-90% EBW. Further considerations for the broad dissemination and implementation of FBT in Japan are also presented. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Iguchi Toshiyuki T Department of Pediatrics, Hoshigaoka Maternity Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. Miyawaki Dai D Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Harada Tomoko T https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8302-8110 Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Ogiwara Kaori K https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7356-5166 Tokyo International Psychotherapy Futako-Tamagawa Office, Tokyo, Japan. eng Journal Article 2020 11 09 United States Int J Eat Disord 8111226 0276-3478 IM Japan adolescents anorexia nervosa culture family-based treatment 2020 07 27 2020 10 28 2020 10 28 2020 11 9 14 28 2020 11 10 6 0 2020 11 10 6 0 aheadofprint 33165943 10.1002/eat.23405 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>57.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The application of continuous glucose monitoring technology to eating disorders research: An idea worth researching.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Presseller EK, Parker MN, Lin M, Weimer J, Juarascio AS<br><font color=gray><i>The International journal of eating disorders Int J Eat Disord The application of continuous glucose monitoring technology to eating disorders research: An idea worth researching. 10.1002/eat.23404 Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices have revolutionized our capacity to measure blood glucose levels in real time using minimally invasive technology, yet to date there are no studies using CGM in individuals with eating disorders (EDs). Preliminary evidence suggests that eating disorder behaviors (EDBs) have substantial and characteristic impacts on blood glucose levels and glucose-related variables (e.g., binge-eating episodes cause rapid spikes in blood glucose levels, purging causes rapid drops in blood glucose to below normal levels). The aims of this article are to describe the benefits of CGM technology over older methods of measuring blood glucose levels and to discuss several specific ways in which CGM technology can be applied to EDs research to (a) improve our ability to identify and predict engagement in EDBs in real time, (b) identify relationships between blood glucose levels and maintenance factors for EDs, and (c) increase our understanding of the physiological and psychological impacts of disordered eating. We also present preliminary acceptability and feasibility data on the use of CGM devices in individuals with EDs. Overall, the article will describe several applications of CGM technology in EDs research with compelling potential to improve research methodologies. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Presseller Emily K EK https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6854-1207 Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Center for Weight, Eating, and Lifestyle Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Parker Megan N MN Section on Growth and Obesity, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Division of Intramural Research, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences (USU), Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Lin Mandy M Center for Weight, Eating, and Lifestyle Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Weimer James J Department of Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Juarascio Adrienne S AS Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Center for Weight, Eating, and Lifestyle Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. eng Journal Article 2020 11 07 United States Int J Eat Disord 8111226 0276-3478 IM affect binge-eating disorder bulimia nervosa cognitive dysfunction eating disorders glucose health outcomes sensor technology technology 2020 09 12 2020 10 15 2020 10 19 2020 11 7 12 7 2020 11 8 6 0 2020 11 8 6 0 aheadofprint 33159708 10.1002/eat.23404 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>58.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Outcomes of a higher calorie inpatient refeeding protocol in Asian adolescents with anorexia nervosa.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Davis C, Hong WJN, Zhang SL, Quek WEG, Lim JKE, Oh JY, Rajasegaran K, Chew CSE<br><font color=gray><i>The International journal of eating disorders Int J Eat Disord Outcomes of a higher calorie inpatient refeeding protocol in Asian adolescents with anorexia nervosa. 10.1002/eat.23403 This study aims to compare the outcomes of higher calorie refeeding (HCR) and a lower calorie refeeding (LCR) methods among a diverse sample of young Asian adolescents admitted to a tertiary institution in Asia for management of anorexia nervosa (AN). This is a retrospective case control study of Asian adolescents who were managed using an inpatient HCR protocol (2016-2017) and an LCR protocol (2010-2014). Baseline characteristics, daily change in percent median body mass index (%mBMI), and rates of refeeding hypophosphatemia were analyzed between groups. A total of 125 adolescents with AN were analyzed with 61 (52%) patients in the HCR group. Mean age was 14.0?years (SD =1.5) and mean presenting %mBMI was 73.2 (SD =6.9) with mean length of stay of 11.9?days (SD =?6.6). Patients in the HCR group had significantly increased rate of change of %mBMI (M?= 0.39, SD?= 0.31) than patients in the LCR group (M =?0.12, SD =?0.43) (p <?.001). There was an increased rate of mild hypophosphatemia in the HCR group (HCR: 46%, LCR: 22%, p =?.007) but no difference in rates of moderate hypophosphatemia and no cases of severe hypophosphataemia. Lower presenting %mBMI significantly predicted the phosphate levels (p =?.004). In a sample of Asian adolescents with AN, use of an HCR protocol was associated with improved rate of inpatient weight gain. There was increased risk of mild hypophosphataemia, but not moderate to severe hypophosphataemia, suggesting that an HCR protocol can be used safely with close monitoring of phosphate levels. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Davis Courtney C https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9439-1000 Adolescent Medicine Service, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. Hong Wei Jie Nicholas WJN KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore. Zhang Stella Letian SL KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore. Quek Wei Ern Grace WEG Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore. Lim Jie Kai Ethel JKE Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore. Oh Jean Yin JY Adolescent Medicine Service, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. Rajasegaran Kumudhini K Adolescent Medicine Service, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. Chew Chu Shan Elaine CSE https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0479-2415 Adolescent Medicine Service, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore, Singapore. eng Journal Article 2020 11 07 United States Int J Eat Disord 8111226 0276-3478 IM Asian adolescent anorexia nervosa eating disorder hypophosphatemia length of stay nutrition nutritional rehabilitation refeeding refeeding syndrome 2020 07 30 2020 10 20 2020 10 21 2020 11 7 8 34 2020 11 8 6 0 2020 11 8 6 0 aheadofprint 33159492 10.1002/eat.23403 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>59.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Self-compassion explains substantially more variance in eating disorder psychopathology and associated impairment than mindfulness.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Messer M, Anderson C, Linardon J<br><font color=gray><i>Body image, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>60.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Differential Expression of DeltaFosB in Reward Processing Regions Between Binge Eating Prone and Resistant Female Rats.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Quansah Amissah R, Chometton S, Calvez J, Guèvremont G, Timofeeva E, Timofeev I<br><font color=gray><i>Frontiers in systems neuroscience, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=p.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=1><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a 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