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Scientific:
   Argyreia nervosa (elephant creeper) 

Synonyms:
   Argyreia nervosa (elephant creeper) 
   Argyreia speciosa 
   Convolvulus nervosus (elephant creeper) 
   Convolvulus speciosus (elephant creeper) 
   Ipomoea speciosa 
   Lettsomia nervosa 
   Rivea nervosa 

Broader Terms:
   Argyreia 
   Convolvulus (Field bindweed) 
   Rivea 
   Solanales 
   elephant 
 
 
Latest Articles on elephant creeper from uBioRSS
Recreational use of D-lysergamide from the seeds of Argyreia nervosa, Ipomo... - PubMed: species
Elephant Creeper, Argyreia nervosa....Bạc Thau, Thảo Bạc tím .....#5 - PLANT [directory] ?? Photo Pool


External Resources:



11.  Probabilistic Mapping of Deep Brain Stimulation: Insights from 15?Years of Therapy.LinkIT
Elias GJB, Boutet A, Joel SE, Germann J, Gwun D, Neudorfer C, Gramer RM, Algarni M, Paramanandam V, Prasad S, Beyn ME, Horn A, Madhavan R, Ranjan M, Lozano CS, Kühn AA, Ashe J, Kucharczyk W, Munhoz RP, Giacobbe P, Kennedy SH, Woodside DB, Kalia SK, Fasano A, Hodaie M, Lozano AM
Annals of neurology, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

12.  Individual and group format adjunct therapy on social emotional skills for adolescent inpatients with severe and complex eating disorders (CREST-A).LinkIT
Harrison A, Stavri P, Tchanturia K
Neuropsychiatrie : Klinik, Diagnostik, Therapie und Rehabilitation : Organ der Gesellschaft Osterreichischer Nervenarzte und Psychiater, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

13.  Is this hypophosphatemia refeeding syndrome or not?LinkIT
Nakajima Y
Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

14.  The regulation of gastric ghrelin secretion.LinkIT
Nunez-Salces M, Li H, Feinle-Bisset C, Young RL, Page AJ
Acta physiologica (Oxford, England), 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

15.  Five-year mortality of severely malnourished patients with chronic anorexia nervosa admitted to a medical unit.LinkIT
Guinhut M, Godart N, Benadjaoud MA, Melchior JC, Hanachi M
Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

16.  Retrospective analysis of hypophosphatemia rates and other clinical parameters in patients with eating disorders.LinkIT
Richardson C, Huniewicz P, Paslakis G
European eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders Association Eur Eat Disord Rev Retrospective analysis of hypophosphatemia rates and other clinical parameters in patients with eating disorders. 10.1002/erv.2810 To retrospectively assess medical services of a specialist inpatient eating disorders (EDs) unit. We retrospectively evaluated clinical parameters of 288 inpatients classified as 'moderately' or 'significantly' medically compromised between 1 January 2016 and 30 June 2019. We analysed 288 patients (mean age 32.5 [SD = 11.4] years, 96% women, 76% with anorexia nervosa). Average length of stay was 38.4 (SD = 28.4) days. Average admission body mass index (BMI) was 14.8 (SD = 1.8) kg/m2 , and 16.1 (SD = 1.9) kg/m2 at 4 weeks. At admission, 82% of patients were considered significantly medically compromised, while 6% were deemed moderately compromised. Only 5% of patients required transfer to intensive care unit. Prevalence of hypophosphatemia was 17.7%; rates did not increase significantly between years despite more assertive re-feeding processes. There was no association between risk classification at admission and change in BMI at 4 weeks (F(2,166) = 0.588, p = 0.557). BMI at admission was found to be significantly associated with clinical outcome (? = 0.92, p < 0.001). Hypophosphatemia rates did not increase despite more assertive re-feeding over 3 years. Our results provide support for a model of treatment that simultaneously addresses the medical and psychiatric sequelae of patients with severe EDs. © 2020 Eating Disorders Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Richardson Candice C https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2518-0912 Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Huniewicz Paulina P Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Paslakis Georgios G https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2069-0024 Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. eng Journal Article 2020 11 28 England Eur Eat Disord Rev 9436977 1072-4133 IM anorexia nervosa bulimia nervosa comorbidity psychotherapy re-feeding 2020 05 18 2020 10 19 2020 11 13 2020 11 28 12 5 2020 11 29 6 0 2020 11 29 6 0 aheadofprint 33247867 10.1002/erv.2810 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>17.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Enhanced cognitive behavior therapy for severe and extreme anorexia nervosa: An outpatient case series.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Calugi S, Sartirana M, Frostad S, Dalle Grave R<br><font color=gray><i>The International journal of eating disorders Int J Eat Disord Enhanced cognitive behavior therapy for severe and extreme anorexia nervosa: An outpatient case series. 10.1002/eat.23428 The study aimed to assess outcomes in patients with severe and extreme anorexia nervosa managed with enhanced cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-E) in a real-world outpatient setting. Thirty patients with anorexia nervosa and body mass index (BMI) <16 aged ?17?years were recruited from consecutive referrals to an eating disorder service clinic offering outpatient CBT-E. BMI and Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), and Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA) scores were recorded at admission, end of treatment, and 20- and 60-week follow-ups for treatment completers. Twenty patients (66.7%) completed the treatment and showed both considerable weight gain (Cohen's f = 1.43), and significantly reduced scores for clinical impairment (f = 1.26) and eating-disorder (f = 1.03) and general psychopathology (f = 0.99). Changes remained stable at both follow-ups. About half of the patients who completed treatment had a BMI ?18.5 at the end of treatment and follow-ups. CBT-E seems suitable and promising for patients with severe and extreme anorexia nervosa seeking treatment in a real-world clinical setting, provided that their medical conditions are stable, and they have no current major depressive episodes or substance abuse; it may represent a valid alternative to inpatient treatment for those who are able to sustain engagement in a full course of outpatient treatment. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Calugi Simona S https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4028-1877 Department of Eating and Weight Disorders, Villa Garda Hospital, Garda, Italy. Sartirana Massimiliano M Department of Eating and Weight Disorders, Villa Garda Hospital, Garda, Italy. Frostad Stein S Department of Mental Health Research, Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Dalle Grave Riccardo R https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9796-3721 Department of Eating and Weight Disorders, Villa Garda Hospital, Garda, Italy. eng Journal Article 2020 11 28 United States Int J Eat Disord 8111226 0276-3478 IM anorexia nervosa cognitive behavior therapy extreme outpatient treatment severe treatment outcomes 2020 07 31 2020 11 19 2020 11 19 2020 11 28 5 37 2020 11 29 6 0 2020 11 29 6 0 aheadofprint 33247462 10.1002/eat.23428 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>18.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Anorexia nervosa restricting type has increased in severity over three decades: Japanese clinical samples from 1988 to 2018.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Harada T, Yamauchi T, Miyawaki D, Miyamoto S, Yoshida H, Nishimoto K, Matsuzuka T, Honda M, Inoue K<br><font color=gray><i>The International journal of eating disorders Int J Eat Disord Anorexia nervosa restricting type has increased in severity over three decades: Japanese clinical samples from 1988 to 2018. 10.1002/eat.23418 Although eating disorders (EDs) surged in the late 1900s and are now recognized worldwide, the time trend of ED characteristics remains unknown. This study aimed to clarify changes in characteristics of anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R) over 30?years. We conducted a cross-sectional study and examined 996 female treatment-seeking patients with AN-R in Japan from 1988 to 2018. Demographics, body mass index (BMI), and Eating Disorder Inventory scores were compared among three groups in accordance with the time of initial consultation: Group 1 (1988-1998), Group 2 (1998-2008), Group 3 (2008-2018). The mean BMI at the initial consultation significantly decreased by 0.6?kg/m2 (from 14.0?kg/m2 in Group 1 to 13.4?kg/m2 in Group 3). Groups 2 and 3 scored significantly higher in drive for thinness, interpersonal distrust, and interoceptive awareness than those in Group 1. The range of onset age is wider and the number of late-onset AN-R with prolonged delay in treatment has increased over time. This study shows that AN-R has increased in physical and psychopathological severity over the past 30?years in Japan. Interdisciplinary research is needed to clarify the relationship between AN-R and time trend. © 2020 The Authors. International Journal of Eating Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. Harada Tomoko T https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8302-8110 Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Yamauchi Tsuneo T Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Miyawaki Dai D Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Miyamoto Saori S Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Yoshida Hisako H Department of Medical Statics, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Nishimoto Kazuya K Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Matsuzuka Takumi T Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Honda Mihoko M Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. Inoue Koki K Department of Neuropsychiatry, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. eng Journal Article 2020 11 27 United States Int J Eat Disord 8111226 0276-3478 IM Japan anorexia nervosa restricting type time trend 2020 07 31 2020 11 04 2020 11 07 2020 11 28 5 37 2020 11 29 6 0 2020 11 29 6 0 aheadofprint 33247460 10.1002/eat.23418 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>19.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Eating disorder characteristics among Hungarian medical students: Changes between 1989 and 2011.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Túry F, Szabó P, Dukay-Szabó S, Szumska I, Simon D, Rathner G<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of behavioral addictions, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>20.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Diets with high carbohydrate contents were associated with refeeding hypophosphatemia: A retrospective study in Japanese inpatients with anorexia nervosa.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Yamazaki T, Inada S, Sawada M, Sekine R, Kubota N, Fukatsu K, Yoshiuchi K<br><font color=gray><i>The International journal of eating disorders Int J Eat Disord Diets with high carbohydrate contents were associated with refeeding hypophosphatemia: A retrospective study in Japanese inpatients with anorexia nervosa. 10.1002/eat.23416 Refeeding hypophosphatemia (RH) is a potentially fatal complication in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), and its dietary preventive strategy is not well established. We aimed to examine the association between carbohydrate content in the diet and the occurrence of RH in inpatients with AN via retrospective medical chart review. We performed a chart review to collect data of patients with AN hospitalized at the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine of the University of Tokyo Hospital between April 1, 2012, and February 29, 2020. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the cutoff point of the percentage of carbohydrate content in the diet for the occurrence of RH. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed with occurrence of RH as the dependent variable and the carbohydrate content of more than the identified cutoff point as the independent variable adjusting for the risk factors for RH. The percentage of carbohydrate content that is higher than the cutoff point obtained from the ROC analysis (58.4%) was significantly associated with the occurrence of RH, even after adjusting for variables associated with RH in univariate logistic regression analysis (age and body mass index) as well as the average daily calorie intake (odds ratio, 5.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.60-18.1; p = .0066). We identified that diets with higher carbohydrate contents were associated with RH in inpatients with AN, even after adjusting for known risk factors. Our findings may promote the development of dietary preventive strategies against RH in inpatients with AN. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC. Yamazaki Tadahiro T Department of Stress Sciences and Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Inada Shuji S Department of Stress Sciences and Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Sawada Mika M Department of Clinical Nutrition Therapy, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Sekine Rie R Department of Clinical Nutrition Therapy, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Kubota Naoto N Department of Clinical Nutrition Therapy, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Fukatsu Kazuhiko K Department of Clinical Nutrition Therapy, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Yoshiuchi Kazuhiro K https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8164-4910 Department of Stress Sciences and Psychosomatic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. eng Journal Article 2020 11 24 United States Int J Eat Disord 8111226 0276-3478 IM anorexia nervosa carbohydrates diet eating disorders inpatients phosphorus metabolism disorders refeeding hypophosphatemia refeeding syndrome retrospective studies 2020 07 09 2020 11 01 2020 11 02 2020 11 26 6 0 2020 11 26 6 0 2020 11 25 5 50 aheadofprint 33236366 10.1002/eat.23416 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=1><img src=p.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=1><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=11><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=1>«</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=1>1</a></td><td align=center>2</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=11>11</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=elephant+creeper&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>