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 uBio  Web Results 21 - 30 of about 202

Synonyms:
   Sphenodon (tuataras) 

Broader Terms:
   Sphenodon (tuataras) 
   Sphenodontidae (tuataras) 

More Specific:
   Sphenodon guntheri (Brother islands tuatara) 
   Sphenodon punctatum 
   Sphenodon punctatus (tuatara) 
 
 
Latest Articles on Sphenodon spp. from uBioRSS


External Resources:

Common Names: tuataras



21.  Microscopical observations on the regenerating tail in the tuatara Sphenodon punctatus indicate a tendency to scarring, but also influence from somatic growth.LinkIT
Alibardi L, Meyer-Rochow VB
Journal of morphology, 2019
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

22.  Behavioral variation in nesting phenology may offset sex-ratio bias in tuatara.LinkIT
Nelson NJ, Keall SN, Refsnider JM, Carter AL
Journal of experimental zoology. Part A, Ecological and integrative physiology, 2018
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

23.  Effects of Warm Temperatures on Metabolic Rate and Evaporative Water Loss in Tuatara, a Cool-Climate Rhynchocephalian Survivor.LinkIT
Jarvie S, Jowett T, Thompson MB, Seddon PJ, Cree A
Physiological and biochemical zoology : PBZ, 2018
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

24.  Neutron scanning reveals unexpected complexity in the enamel thickness of an herbivorous Jurassic reptile.LinkIT
Jones MEH, Lucas PW, Tucker AS, Watson AP, Sertich JJW, Foster JR, Williams R, Garbe U, Bevitt JJ, Salvemini F
Journal of the Royal Society, Interface, 2018
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

25.  Thermoregulation of a temperate reptile in a forested habitat.LinkIT
Corkery I, Bell BD, Nelson NJ
Zoology (Jena, Germany), 2018
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

26.  Anatomical network analysis of the musculoskeletal system reveals integration loss and parcellation boost during the fins-to-limbs transition.LinkIT
Esteve-Altava B, Molnar JL, Johnston P, Hutchinson JR, Diogo R
Evolution; international journal of organic evolution, 2018
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

27.  Interspecies differences in plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and dermal Vitamin D synthesis of kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), and New Zealand sea lions (Phocarctos hookeri).LinkIT
Kale MS, Dittmer KE, Roe WD, Gartrell BD
Journal of comparative physiology. B, Biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology, 2018
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

28.  Functional anatomy of a giant toothless mandible from a bird-like dinosaur: Gigantoraptor and the evolution of the oviraptorosaurian jaw.LinkIT
Ma W, Wang J, Pittman M, Tan Q, Tan L, Guo B, Xu X
Scientific reports, 2017
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

29.  Temperature selection by juvenile tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) is not influenced by temperatures experienced as embryos.261-266S0306-4565(17)30223-110.1016/j.jtherbio.2017.08.008Most reptiles thermoregulate to achieve body temperatures needed for biological processes, such as digestion and growth. Temperatures experienced during embryogenesis may also influence post-hatching growth rate, potentially through influencing post-hatching choice of temperatures. We investigated in laboratory settings whether embryonic temperatures (constant 18°C, 21°C and 22°C) influence selected body temperatures (Tsel) of juvenile tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), providing a possible mechanism for differences in growth rates. We found that incubation temperature does not influence Tsel. Although the average daily mean Tsel was 21.6 ± 0.3°C, we recorded individual Tsel values up to 33.5°C in juvenile tuatara, which is higher than expected and above the panting threshold of 31-33°C reported for adults. We found diel patterns of Tsel of juvenile tuatara, observing a general pattern of two apparent peaks and troughs per day, with Tsel being significantly lower around dawn and at 1500h than any other time. When comparing our results with other studies on tuatara there is a remarkable consistency in mean Tsel of ~ 21°C across tuatara of different ages, sizes and acclimatization histories. The ability of juvenile tuatara to withstand a wide range of temperatures supports their former widespread distribution throughout New Zealand and warrants further investigation into their plasticity to withstand climate warming, particularly where they have choices of habitat and the ability to thermoregulate.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.NelsonNicola JNJSchool of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140, New Zealand. Electronic address: nicola.nelson@vuw.ac.nz.KeallSusan NSNSchool of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140, New Zealand.HareKelly MKMResearch Office, The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand, Private Bag 31914, Lower Hutt 5040, New Zealand.engJournal Article20170816EnglandJ Therm Biol76001150306-4565IMAnimalsBody TemperatureBody Temperature RegulationCircadian ClocksFemaleMaleNew ZealandReptilesembryologygrowth & developmentphysiologySeasonsTemperatureBody temperatureCircadianGrowthSelected temperatureThermoregulation2017061220170814201708142017101860201710196020186560ppublish29037392S0306-4565(17)30223-110.1016/j.jtherbio.2017.08.00828590685NBK43575510.1007/978-3-319-28802-4_2SpringerCham (CH)Micro-, Meso- and Macro-Dynamics of the Brain2016BuzsákiGyörgyGThe Neuroscience Institute, New York University, School of Medicine, New York, New York, USAChristenYvesYFondation Ipsen, Boulogne-Billancourt, France9783319288017978331928802410.1007/978-3-319-28802-4InternetCortical Evolution: Introduction to the Reptilian CortexLinkIT
Nelson NJ, Keall SN, Hare KM, , Buzsáki G, Christen Y, , Laurent G, Fournier J, Hemberger M, Müller C, Naumann R, Ondracek JM, Pammer L, Reiter S, Shein-Idelson M, Tosches MA, Yamawaki T
Journal of thermal biology, 2017OctJournal of thermal biologyJ Therm BiolTemperature selection by juvenile tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) is not influenced by temperatures experienced as embryos.261-266S0306-4565(17)30223-110.1016/j.jtherbio.2017.08.008Most reptiles thermoregulate to achieve body temperatures needed for biological processes, such as digestion and growth. Temperatures experienced during embryogenesis may also influence post-hatching growth rate, potentially through influencing post-hatching choice of temperatures. We investigated in laboratory settings whether embryonic temperatures (constant 18°C, 21°C and 22°C) influence selected body temperatures (Tsel) of juvenile tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), providing a possible mechanism for differences in growth rates. We found that incubation temperature does not influence Tsel. Although the average daily mean Tsel was 21.6 ± 0.3°C, we recorded individual Tsel values up to 33.5°C in juvenile tuatara, which is higher than expected and above the panting threshold of 31-33°C reported for adults. We found diel patterns of Tsel of juvenile tuatara, observing a general pattern of two apparent peaks and troughs per day, with Tsel being significantly lower around dawn and at 1500h than any other time. When comparing our results with other studies on tuatara there is a remarkable consistency in mean Tsel of ~ 21°C across tuatara of different ages, sizes and acclimatization histories. The ability of juvenile tuatara to withstand a wide range of temperatures supports their former widespread distribution throughout New Zealand and warrants further investigation into their plasticity to withstand climate warming, particularly where they have choices of habitat and the ability to thermoregulate.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.NelsonNicola JNJSchool of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140, New Zealand. Electronic address: nicola.nelson@vuw.ac.nz.KeallSusan NSNSchool of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140, New Zealand.HareKelly MKMResearch Office, The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand, Private Bag 31914, Lower Hutt 5040, New Zealand.engJournal Article20170816EnglandJ Therm Biol76001150306-4565IMAnimalsBody TemperatureBody Temperature RegulationCircadian ClocksFemaleMaleNew ZealandReptilesembryologygrowth & developmentphysiologySeasonsTemperatureBody temperatureCircadianGrowthSelected temperatureThermoregulation2017061220170814201708142017101860201710196020186560ppublish29037392S0306-4565(17)30223-110.1016/j.jtherbio.2017.08.00828590685NBK43575510.1007/978-3-319-28802-4_2SpringerCham (CH)Micro-, Meso- and Macro-Dynamics of the Brain2016
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0



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