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Synonyms:
   Reptilia (reptiles) 

Broader Terms:
   Amniota 
   Chordata (Chordate) 
   Reptilia (reptiles) 
   Sauropsida 
   Vertebrata (Vertebrate) 

More Specific:
   Agama (Typical Agamas) 
   Amphisbaenia (Worm Lizards) 
   Anapsida 
   Bitis nasicornis (Rhinoceros Viper) 
   Caenophidia 
   Chelonia (Green Turtles) 
   Crocodilia (alligators) 
   Crocodylia 
   Dendroaspis jamesoni (Jameson's Mamba) 
   Diapsida (Diapsid) 
   Kinixys belliana (Bell's Hingeback Tortoise) 
   Lygodactylus picturatus (Painted Dwarf Gecko) 
   Mabuia 
   Mabuya perrotetii (Teita Mabuya) 
   Mabuya raddoni 
   Rhynchocephalia (tuataras) 
   Sauria (lizards) 
   Serpentes (snakes) 
   Squamata (amphisbaenians) 
   Testudines (terrapins) 
   Typhlops (Blind Snakes) 
   Unassigned 
   Varanus niloticus (Nile Monitor, Water Leguaan) 
 
 
Latest Articles on Reptilia from uBioRSS


Typhlops vermicularis
Petr Balej - BioLib

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Common Names: lepidosaurs, Rettili, 爬虫綱, crocodilians, anapsid reptiles, Gady, répteis, Réptiles, Reptile, reptiles, Пресмыкающиеся, Рептилии, répteis, turtles



71.  Outbreak of human infections with uncommon Salmonella serotypes linked to pet bearded dragons, 2012-2014.LinkIT
Kiebler CA, Bottichio L, Simmons L, Basler C, Klos R, Gurfield N, Roberts E, Kimura A, Lewis LS, Bird K, Stiles F, Schlater LK, Lantz K, Edling T, Barton Behravesh C
Zoonoses and public health Zoonoses Public Health Outbreak of human infections with uncommon Salmonella serotypes linked to pet bearded dragons, 2012-2014. 425-434 10.1111/zph.12701 Reptiles are one of the fastest growing sectors in the United States pet industry. Reptile-associated salmonellosis (RAS) continues to be an important public health problem, especially among children. We investigated an outbreak of human Salmonella infections resulting from serotypes Cotham and Kisarawe, predominately occurring among children. An outbreak of illnesses was identified in persons with exposure to pet bearded dragon lizards. Human and animal health officials, in cooperation with the pet industry, conducted epidemiologic, traceback and laboratory investigations. Onsite sampling was conducted at two US breeding facilities, one foreign breeding facility, and a large pet retail chain. A total of 166 patients in 36 states were identified with illness onset dates from 02/2012-06/2014. The median patient age was 3 years (range, <1-79 years), 57% were aged ?5 years, and 37% were aged ?1 year. Forty-four patients (37%) were hospitalized, predominantly children. Sampling at breeding facilities and a national pet store chain resulted in isolation of outbreak serotypes at each facility; isolation proportions ranged from 2%-24% of samples collected at each facility.Epidemiologic, microbiologic and traceback evidence linked an outbreak of uncommon Salmonella serotypes to contact with pet bearded dragons. The high proportion of infants involved in this outbreak highlights the need to educate owners about the risk of RAS in children and the potential for household contamination by pet reptiles or their habitats. Strategies should be developed to improve breeding practices, biosecurity and monitoring protocols to reduce Salmonella in the pet reptile trade. © 2020 Blackwell Verlag GmbH. Kiebler Craig A CA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Bottichio Lyndsay L Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Simmons Latoya L Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Basler Colin C Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Klos Rachel R Wisconsin Division of Public Health, Madison, WI, USA. Gurfield Nikos N San Diego County Department of Environmental Health, San Diego, CA, USA. Roberts Elizabeth E California State Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA, USA. Kimura Akiko A California State Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA, USA. Lewis Linda S LS Butte Country Public Health, Chico, CA, USA. Bird Kiyomi K Butte Country Public Health, Chico, CA, USA. Stiles Felicia F Butte Country Public Health, Chico, CA, USA. Schlater Linda K LK United States Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Ames, IA, USA. Lantz Kristina K United States Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Ames, IA, USA. Edling Thomas T Petco Animal Supplies, San Diego, CA, USA. Barton Behravesh Casey C https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2270-5573 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. eng Journal Article 2020 04 18 Germany Zoonoses Public Health 101300786 1863-1959 IM Salmonella bearded dragon outbreak paediatric reptiles zoonoses 2019 12 20 2020 02 16 2020 4 19 6 0 2020 4 19 6 0 2020 4 19 6 0 ppublish 32304287 10.1111/zph.12701 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>72.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Inner ear sensory system changes as extinct crocodylomorphs transitioned from land to water.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Schwab JA, Young MT, Neenan JM, Walsh SA, Witmer LM, Herrera Y, Allain R, Brochu CA, Choiniere JN, Clark JM, Dollman KN, Etches S, Fritsch G, Gignac PM, Ruebenstahl A, Sachs S, Turner AH, Vignaud P, Wilberg EW, Xu X, Zanno LE, Brusatte SL<br><font color=gray><i>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>73.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Captivity affects head morphology and allometry in headstarted garter snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Ryerson WG<br><font color=gray><i>Integrative and comparative biology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>74.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in tortoises and Hyalomma aegyptium ticks in East Thrace, Turkey: potential of a cryptic transmission cycle.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Kar S, Rodriguez SE, Akyildiz G, Cajimat MNB, Bircan R, Mears MC, Bente DA, Keles AG<br><font color=gray><i>Parasites & vectors, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>75.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Climate suitability as a predictor of conservation translocation failure.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Bellis J, Bourke D, Maschinski J, Heineman K, Dalrymple S<br><font color=gray><i>Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>76.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Temperature-dependent sex determination is mediated by pSTAT3 repression of <i>Kdm6b</i>.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Weber C, Zhou Y, Lee JG, Looger LL, Qian G, Ge C, Capel B<br><font color=gray><i>Science (New York, N.Y.), 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>77.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Thermal sensitivity of lizard embryos indicates a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand at near-lethal temperatures.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Hall JM, Warner DA<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of experimental zoology. Part A, Ecological and integrative physiology J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol Thermal sensitivity of lizard embryos indicates a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand at near-lethal temperatures. 10.1002/jez.2359 Aspects of global change create stressful thermal environments that threaten biodiversity. Oviparous, non-avian reptiles have received considerable attention because eggs are left to develop under prevailing conditions, leaving developing embryos vulnerable to increases in temperature. Though many studies assess embryo responses to long-term (i.e., chronic), constant incubation temperatures, few assess responses to acute exposures which are more relevant for many species. We subjected brown anole (Anolis sagrei) eggs to heat shocks, thermal ramps, and extreme diurnal fluctuations to determine the lethal temperature of embryos, measure the thermal sensitivity of embryo heart rate and metabolism, and quantify the effects of sublethal but stressful temperatures on development and hatchling phenotypes and survival. Most embryos died at heat shocks of 45°C or 46°C, which is ~12°C warmer than the highest constant temperatures suitable for successful development. Heart rate and O2 consumption increased with temperature; however, as embryos approached the lethal temperature, heart rate and CO2 production continued rising while O2 consumption plateaued. These data indicate a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand at high temperatures. Exposure to extreme, diurnal fluctuations depressed embryo developmental rates and heart rates, and resulted in hatchlings with smaller body size, reduced growth rates, and lower survival in the laboratory. Thus, even brief exposure to extreme temperatures can have important effects on embryo development, and our study highlights the role of both immediate and cumulative effects of high temperatures on egg survival. Such effects must be considered to predict how populations will respond to global change. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Hall Joshua M JM http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5587-3402 Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. Warner Daniel A DA http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7231-7785 Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. eng 1564563 National Science Foundation, Division of Environmental Biology Graduate Research Scholars Program Alabama EPSCoR Journal Article 2020 04 16 United States J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol 101710204 2471-5638 IM climate change critical thermal maximum heart rate heat shock metabolic rate oxygen-limited thermal tolerance 2020 01 20 2020 03 27 2020 03 30 2020 4 17 6 0 2020 4 17 6 0 2020 4 17 6 0 aheadofprint 32297716 10.1002/jez.2359 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>78.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The complete genome sequence of bearded dragon adenovirus 1 harbors three genes encoding proteins of the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Pénzes JJ, Szirovicza L, Harrach B<br><font color=gray><i>Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>79.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>A new species of Cruzia (Ascaridida; Kathlanidae) parasitizing Salvator merianae (Squamata, Teiidae) from the Atlantic forest in Brazil.</ArticleTitle> <Pagination> <MedlinePgn>e018519</MedlinePgn> </Pagination> <ELocationID EIdType="pii" ValidYN="Y">S1984-29612020000100314</ELocationID> <ELocationID EIdType="doi" ValidYN="Y">10.1590/S1984-29612019111</ELocationID> <Abstract> <AbstractText>Cruzia lauroi sp. nov. is described from Salvator merianae (Duméril & Bibron, 1839) (Squamata; Teiidae). The new species differs from all previously described species through several morphological characteristics: number of tooth like structures per row in the inner pharynx; and presence of unpaired papillae on the anterior border of the cloacal aperture. However, Cruzia lauroi sp. nov. is closest to C. tentaculata (Rudolphi, 1819), through having similar distribution of male caudal papillae, unpaired pre-cloacal papillae and females with an pre-equatorial vulva. Cruzia lauroi sp. nov. differs from C. tentaculata regarding smaller total body length of individuals, higher number of tooth like structures per row in the pharynx, greater size of diverticulum, smaller size of spicules and a more anterior vulva than in C. tentaculata; and the males do not have caudal alae. Cruzia mazza, C. travassosia, C. mexicana and C. testudines were considered to be species inquirendae, because their descriptions need more detailed taxonomic studies.</AbstractText> </Abstract> <AuthorList CompleteYN="Y"> <Author ValidYN="Y"> <LastName>Vieira</LastName> <ForeName>Fabiano Matos</ForeName> <Initials>FM</Initials> <Identifier Source="ORCID">http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5220-7252</Identifier> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Laboratório de Helmintos Parasitos de Vertebrados, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Programa de Pós-graduação em Biodiversidade e Saúde - PPGBS, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> </Author> <Author ValidYN="Y"> <LastName>Gonçalves</LastName> <ForeName>Paula Araujo</ForeName> <Initials>PA</Initials> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Laboratório de Helmintos Parasitos de Vertebrados, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Programa de Pós-graduação em Biodiversidade e Saúde - PPGBS, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> </Author> <Author ValidYN="Y"> <LastName>Lima</LastName> <ForeName>Sueli de Souza</ForeName> <Initials>SS</Initials> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Laboratório de Taxonomia e Ecologia de Helmintos "Odile Bain", Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora - UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> </Author> <Author ValidYN="Y"> <LastName>Sousa</LastName> <ForeName>Bernadete Maria de</ForeName> <Initials>BM</Initials> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Laboratório de Herpetologia-Répteis, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora - UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> </Author> <Author ValidYN="Y"> <LastName>Muniz-Pereira</LastName> <ForeName>Luís Cláudio</ForeName> <Initials>LC</Initials> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Laboratório de Helmintos Parasitos de Vertebrados, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> <AffiliationInfo> <Affiliation>Programa de Pós-graduação em Biodiversidade e Saúde - PPGBS, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.</Affiliation> </AffiliationInfo> </Author> </AuthorList> <Language>eng</Language> <PublicationTypeList> <PublicationType UI="D016428">Journal Article</PublicationType> </PublicationTypeList> <ArticleDate DateType="Electronic"> <Year>2020</Year> <Month>04</Month> <Day>09</Day> </ArticleDate> </Article> <MedlineJournalInfo> <Country>Brazil</Country> <MedlineTA>Rev Bras Parasitol Vet</MedlineTA> <NlmUniqueID>9440482</NlmUniqueID> <ISSNLinking>0103-846X</ISSNLinking> </MedlineJournalInfo> <CitationSubset>IM</CitationSubset> <MeshHeadingList> <MeshHeading> <DescriptorName UI="D000818" MajorTopicYN="N">Animals</DescriptorName> </MeshHeading> <MeshHeading> <DescriptorName UI="D017162" MajorTopicYN="N">Ascaridida</DescriptorName> <QualifierName UI="Q000033" MajorTopicYN="Y">anatomy & histology</QualifierName> <QualifierName UI="Q000145" MajorTopicYN="Y">classification</QualifierName> <QualifierName UI="Q000302" MajorTopicYN="N">isolation & purification</QualifierName> </MeshHeading> <MeshHeading> <DescriptorName UI="D001938" MajorTopicYN="N" Type="Geographic">Brazil</DescriptorName> </MeshHeading> <MeshHeading> <DescriptorName UI="D005260" MajorTopicYN="N">Female</DescriptorName> </MeshHeading> <MeshHeading> <DescriptorName UI="D065928" MajorTopicYN="N">Forests</DescriptorName> </MeshHeading> <MeshHeading> <DescriptorName UI="D008116" MajorTopicYN="N">Lizards</DescriptorName> <QualifierName UI="Q000469" MajorTopicYN="Y">parasitology</QualifierName> </MeshHeading> <MeshHeading> <DescriptorName UI="D008297" MajorTopicYN="N">Male</DescriptorName> </MeshHeading> </MeshHeadingList> </MedlineCitation> <PubmedData> <History> <PubMedPubDate PubStatus="received"> <Year>2019</Year> <Month>10</Month> <Day>14</Day> </PubMedPubDate> <PubMedPubDate PubStatus="accepted"> <Year>2019</Year> <Month>12</Month> <Day>09</Day> </PubMedPubDate> <PubMedPubDate PubStatus="entrez"> <Year>2020</Year> <Month>4</Month> <Day>16</Day> <Hour>6</Hour> <Minute>0</Minute> </PubMedPubDate> <PubMedPubDate PubStatus="pubmed"> <Year>2020</Year> <Month>4</Month> <Day>16</Day> <Hour>6</Hour> <Minute>0</Minute> </PubMedPubDate> <PubMedPubDate PubStatus="medline"> <Year>2020</Year> <Month>5</Month> <Day>1</Day> <Hour>6</Hour> <Minute>0</Minute> </PubMedPubDate> </History> <PublicationStatus>epublish</PublicationStatus> <ArticleIdList> <ArticleId IdType="pubmed">32294721</ArticleId> <ArticleId IdType="pii">S1984-29612020000100314</ArticleId> <ArticleId IdType="doi">10.1590/S1984-29612019111</ArticleId> </ArticleIdList> </PubmedData></PubmedArticle><PubmedBookArticle> <BookDocument> <PMID Version="1">32310522</PMID> <ArticleIdList> <ArticleId IdType="bookaccession">NBK556062</ArticleId> </ArticleIdList> <Book> <Publisher> <PublisherName>StatPearls Publishing</PublisherName> <PublisherLocation>Treasure Island (FL)</PublisherLocation> </Publisher> <BookTitle book="statpearls">StatPearls</BookTitle> <PubDate> <Year>2020</Year> <Month>01</Month> </PubDate> <BeginningDate> <Year>2020</Year> <Month>01</Month> </BeginningDate> <Medium>Internet</Medium> </Book> <ArticleTitle book="statpearls" part="article-41308">Cannabinoids</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Vieira FM, Gonçalves PA, Lima SS, Sousa BM, Muniz-Pereira LC, , Sheikh NK, Dua A<br><font color=gray><i>Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology : Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia Veterinaria, 2020</Year> </PubDate> </JournalIssue> <Title>Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology : Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia Veterinaria Rev Bras Parasitol Vet A new species of Cruzia (Ascaridida; Kathlanidae) parasitizing Salvator merianae (Squamata, Teiidae) from the Atlantic forest in Brazil. e018519 S1984-29612020000100314 10.1590/S1984-29612019111 Cruzia lauroi sp. nov. is described from Salvator merianae (Duméril & Bibron, 1839) (Squamata; Teiidae). The new species differs from all previously described species through several morphological characteristics: number of tooth like structures per row in the inner pharynx; and presence of unpaired papillae on the anterior border of the cloacal aperture. However, Cruzia lauroi sp. nov. is closest to C. tentaculata (Rudolphi, 1819), through having similar distribution of male caudal papillae, unpaired pre-cloacal papillae and females with an pre-equatorial vulva. Cruzia lauroi sp. nov. differs from C. tentaculata regarding smaller total body length of individuals, higher number of tooth like structures per row in the pharynx, greater size of diverticulum, smaller size of spicules and a more anterior vulva than in C. tentaculata; and the males do not have caudal alae. Cruzia mazza, C. travassosia, C. mexicana and C. testudines were considered to be species inquirendae, because their descriptions need more detailed taxonomic studies. Vieira Fabiano Matos FM http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5220-7252 Laboratório de Helmintos Parasitos de Vertebrados, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. Programa de Pós-graduação em Biodiversidade e Saúde - PPGBS, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. Gonçalves Paula Araujo PA Laboratório de Helmintos Parasitos de Vertebrados, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. Programa de Pós-graduação em Biodiversidade e Saúde - PPGBS, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. Lima Sueli de Souza SS Laboratório de Taxonomia e Ecologia de Helmintos "Odile Bain", Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora - UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brasil. Sousa Bernadete Maria de BM Laboratório de Herpetologia-Répteis, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora - UFJF, Campus Universitário, Juiz de Fora, MG, Brasil. Muniz-Pereira Luís Cláudio LC Laboratório de Helmintos Parasitos de Vertebrados, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. Programa de Pós-graduação em Biodiversidade e Saúde - PPGBS, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz - IOC, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz - FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil. eng Journal Article 2020 04 09 Brazil Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 9440482 0103-846X IM Animals Ascaridida anatomy & histology classification isolation & purification Brazil Female Forests Lizards parasitology Male 2019 10 14 2019 12 09 2020 4 16 6 0 2020 4 16 6 0 2020 5 1 6 0 epublish 32294721 S1984-29612020000100314 10.1590/S1984-29612019111 32310522 NBK556062 StatPearls Publishing Treasure Island (FL) StatPearls 2020
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