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Broader Terms:
   Mormyroidea 
   Mormyroidei 
   Notopteroidei 
   Osteoglossiformes (Bonytongues) 

More Specific:
   Boulengeromyrus 
   Brienomyrus 
   Campylomormyrus 
   Campylomornyrus 
   Centriscus 
   Cyphomyrus 
   Genyomyrus 
   Gnathonemus 
   Heteromormyrus 
   Hippopotamyrus 
   Hyperopisus 
   Hyperopsis 
   Hyppopotamyrus 
   Isichthys 
   Ivindomyrus 
   Marcusenius 
   Marcusennius 
   Mormyrodes 
   Mormyrops 
   Mormyros 
   Mormyrus 
   Murmyrous 
   Myomyrus 
   Oxymormyrus 
   Oxyrhynchus (Oxyrhynchus) 
   Paramormyrops 
   Paramyomyrus 
   Petrocephalus 
   Pollimyrus 
   Polymyrus 
   Scrophicephalus 
   Solenomormyrus 
   Stomatorhinus 
   Thys 
 
 
Latest Articles on Mormyridae from uBioRSS
Name of new weakly electric fish species reflects hope for peace in Central... - EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dujardinascaris mormyropsis n. sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from the osteoglo... - PubMed: "n sp"


Centriscus scolopax
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External Resources:

Common Names: Elephantfishes, elephant fishes, Mormyrids



1.  Deep genetic and morphological divergence in the Hippopotamyrus ansorgii species complex (Teleostei: Mormyridae) in southern Africa.LinkIT
Mutizwa TI, Kadye WT, Chakona A
Journal of fish biologyJ Fish BiolDeep genetic and morphological divergence in the Hippopotamyrus ansorgii species complex (Teleostei: Mormyridae) in southern Africa.543-55610.1111/jfb.14743The present study used molecular and morphological approaches to investigate hidden diversity within the Hippopotamyrus ansorgii species complex in southern Africa. Phylogenetic reconstructions and three species delimitation methods based on two mitochondrial markers (cytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase I) and one nuclear marker (S7) revealed 12 Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs), with two of them representing two recently described species, Hippopotamyrus longilateralis and Hippopotamyrus szaboi. The highest diversity occurred in the Kwanza River system, which contained five MOTUs, and the Upper Zambezi River system that had two MOTUs. Five other river systems contained a single MOTU each. A major impediment to the review of this complex has been the uncertainty surrounding the type locality of the specimens that were used for the description of H. ansorgii. The present study has, through a careful examination of published literature and synthesis of information on the travel activities of Dr. William Ansorge who collected the specimens, identified the Kwanza River system as the most plausible source of the syntypes. The resolution of the type locality of H. ansorgii facilitates future work on the review of this complex which is critical for providing reliable biodiversity estimates, identifying effective conservation management strategies and understanding the evolutionary history and biogeographic patterns of the fishes of this region.© 2021 Fisheries Society of the British Isles.MutizwaTadiwa ITIDepartment of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science, Rhodes University, Makhanda (Grahamstown), South Africa.NRF-South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, Makhanda (Grahamstown), South Africa.KadyeWilbert TWThttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5273-8360Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science, Rhodes University, Makhanda (Grahamstown), South Africa.ChakonaAlbertAhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-6844-7501Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science, Rhodes University, Makhanda (Grahamstown), South Africa.NRF-South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, Makhanda (Grahamstown), South Africa.engIBIP-BS13100251309NRF-FBIPJournal Article20210419EnglandJ Fish Biol02140550022-1112IMAfrica, SouthernAnimalsBiodiversityElectric FishPhylogenyRiversKwanzaZambezian headwaters ecoregioneastern Zimbabwe highlands ecoregionhidden diversityintegrative taxonomymormyrids20210318202008042021033020214460202191860202143555ppublish3381135310.1111/jfb.14743REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>2.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Ontogeny of the electric organ discharge and of the papillae of the electrocytes in the weakly electric fish Campylomormyrus rhynchophorus (Teleostei: <b>Mormyridae</b>).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Korniienko Y, Tiedemann R, Vater M, Kirschbaum F<br><font color=gray><i>The Journal of comparative neurologyJ Comp NeurolOntogeny of the electric organ discharge and of the papillae of the electrocytes in the weakly electric fish Campylomormyrus rhynchophorus (Teleostei: Mormyridae).1052-106510.1002/cne.25003The electric organ of the mormyrid weakly electric fish, Campylomormyrus rhynchophorus (Boulenger, 1898), undergoes changes in both the electric organ discharge (EOD) and the light and electron microscopic morphology as the fish mature from the juvenile to the adult form. Of particular interest was the appearance of papillae, surface specializations of the uninnervated anterior face of the electrocyte, which have been hypothesized to increase the duration of the EOD. In a 24.5?mm long juvenile the adult electric organ (EO) was not yet functional, and the electrocytes lacked papillae. A 40?mm long juvenile, which produced a short biphasic EOD of 1.3 ms duration, shows small papillae (average area 136??m2 ). In contrast, the EOD of a 79?mm long juvenile was triphasic. The large increase in duration of the EOD to 23.2 ms was accompanied by a small change in size of the papillae (average area 159??m2 ). Similarly, a 150?mm long adult produced a triphasic EOD of comparable duration to the younger stage (24.7 ms) but featured a prominent increase in size of the papillae (average area 402??m2 ). Thus, there was no linear correlation between EOD duration and papillary size. The most prominent ultrastructural change was at the level of the myofilaments, which regularly extended into the papillae, only in the oldest specimen-probably serving a supporting function. Physiological mechanisms, like gene expression levels, as demonstrated in some Campylomormyrus species, might be more important concerning the duration of the EOD.© 2020 The Authors. The Journal of Comparative Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.KorniienkoYevheniiaYHumboldt University of Berlin, Faculty of Life Sciences, Albrecht Daniel Thaer-Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Unit of Biology and Ecology of Fishes, Berlin, Germany.TiedemannRalphRUniversity of Potsdam, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, Unit of Evolutionary Biology / Systematic Zoology, Potsdam-Golm, Germany.VaterMarianneMUnit of General Zoology, Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam Golm, Germany.KirschbaumFrankF0000-0002-3046-5218Humboldt University of Berlin, Faculty of Life Sciences, Albrecht Daniel Thaer-Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Unit of Biology and Ecology of Fishes, Berlin, Germany.engJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20200907United StatesJ Comp Neurol04060410021-9967IMCampylomormyruselectric organ dischargeelectrocyte ontogenyelectrocyte ultrastructurepapillae201909302020072820200806202081460202081460202081460ppublish3278595010.1002/cne.25003REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>3.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>First cytogenetic information for five Nilotic elephantfishes and a problem of ancestral karyotype of the family <b>Mormyridae</b> (Osteoglossiformes).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Simanovsky S, Medvedev D, Tefera F, Golubtsov A<br><font color=gray><i>Comparative cytogenetics, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>First adult cyclophyllidean tapeworm (Cestoda) from teleost fishes: host switching beyond tetrapods in Africa.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Scholz T, Tavakol S, Luus-Powell WJ<br><font color=gray><i>International journal for parasitology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Intragenus F1-hybrids of African weakly electric fish (<b>Mormyridae</b>: Campylomormyrus tamandua ??×?C. compressirostris ?) are fertile.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Korniienko Y, Nguyen L, Baumgartner S, Vater M, Tiedemann R, Kirschbaum F<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of comparative physiology. A, Neuroethology, sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Ontogeny of electric organ and electric organ discharge in Campylomormyrus rhynchophorus (Teleostei: <b>Mormyridae</b>).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Nguyen L, Mamonekene V, Vater M, Bartsch P, Tiedemann R, Kirschbaum F<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of comparative physiology. A, Neuroethology, sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The Cyphomyrus Myers 1960 (Osteoglossiformes: <b>Mormyridae</b>) of the Lufira basin (Upper Lualaba: DR Congo): A generic reassignment and the description of a new species.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Mukweze Mulelenu C, Katemo Manda B, Decru E, Chocha Manda A, Vreven E<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of fish biologyJ Fish BiolThe Cyphomyrus Myers 1960 (Osteoglossiformes: Mormyridae) of the Lufira basin (Upper Lualaba: DR Congo): A generic reassignment and the description of a new species.1123-114110.1111/jfb.14237Within a comparative morphological framework, Hippopotamyrus aelsbroecki, only known from the holotype originating from Lubumbashi, most probably the Lubumbashi River, a left bank subaffluent of the Luapula River, is reallocated to the genus Cyphomyrus. This transfer is motivated by the fact that H. aelsbroecki possesses a rounded or vaulted predorsal profile, an insertion of the dorsal fin far anterior to the level of the insertion of the anal fin, and a compact, laterally compressed and deep body. In addition, a new species of Cyphomyrus is described from the Lufira basin, Cyphomyrus lufirae. Cyphomyrus lufirae was collected in large parts of the Middle Lufira, upstream of the Kyubo Falls and just downstream of these falls in the lower Lufira and its nearby left bank affluent, the Luvilombo River. The new species is distinguished from all its congeners, that is, firstly, from C. aelsbroecki, C. cubangoensis and C. discorhynchus, by a low number of dorsal fin rays, 27-32 (vs. higher, 36 (37), 34 (33-41) an 38 (38-40), respectively) and, secondly, from C. aelsbroecki, C. cubangoensis, and C. discorhynchus by a large prepelvic distance, 41.0-43.8% LS (vs. shorter, 39.7%, 38.9-39.1% and 37.0-41.0% LS , respectively). The description of yet another new species for the Upemba National Park and the Kundelungu National Park further highlights their importance for fish protection and conservation in the area. Hence, there is an urgent need for the full integration of fish into the management plans of these parks.© 2019 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.Mukweze MulelenuChristianCDépartement de Zootechnie, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université de Kolwezi, Kolwezi, Democratic Republic of the Congo.Département de Gestion des Ressources Naturelles Renouvelables, Unité de recherche en Biodiversité et Exploitation durable des Zones Humides, Université de Lubumbashi, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo.Vertebrate Section, Ichthyology, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Katemo MandaBauchetBDépartement de Gestion des Ressources Naturelles Renouvelables, Unité de recherche en Biodiversité et Exploitation durable des Zones Humides, Université de Lubumbashi, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo.Vertebrate Section, Ichthyology, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.DecruEvaEVertebrate Section, Ichthyology, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Chocha MandaAugusteADépartement de Gestion des Ressources Naturelles Renouvelables, Unité de recherche en Biodiversité et Exploitation durable des Zones Humides, Université de Lubumbashi, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo.VrevenEmmanuelEVertebrate Section, Ichthyology, Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.engThis study was made possible by a DEA scholarship (2016-2018) to the first author (CMM) from the Mbisa Congo project (2013-2018), financed through a framework agreement project between the RMCA and the Belgian Development Cooperation.2016-2018DEA scholarship2013-2018Mbisa Congo projectRMCABelgian Development CooperationJournal Article20200218EnglandJ Fish Biol02140550022-1112IMAnimalsCongoElectric Fishanatomy & histologyclassificationRiversSpecies SpecificityCyphomyrus aelsbroeckiCyphomyrus discorhynchusDNA barcodingKundelungu National ParkUpemba National Parkmorphometry201901092019121520191220602020626602019122060ppublish3185629410.1111/jfb.14237REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Hidden species diversity in Marcusenius moorii (Teleostei: <b>Mormyridae</b>) from the Congo Basin.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Mambo Baba T, Kisekelwa T, Danadu Mizani C, Decru E, Vreven E<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of fish biologyJ Fish BiolHidden species diversity in Marcusenius moorii (Teleostei: Mormyridae) from the Congo Basin.1100-112210.1111/jfb.14226New collections from the Yangambi Biosphere Reserve (YBR) and Okapi Wildlife Reserve (OWR) revealed the presence of two groups of specimens similar to, but different from Marcusenius moorii. To study both these groups, an integrated morphological and genetic (mtDNA, cytb) approach was used. This study revealed that one of the two groups is conspecific with Marcusenius lambouri, a junior synonym of M. moorii, which is herein revalidated, with M. moorii longulus as its junior synonym. Marcusenius lambouri differs from M. moorii by a higher number of lateral line scales (44-46 vs. 40-43), a shorter pectoral-fin length (14.6-19.9 vs. 20.3-25.2% standard length; LS ) and a more elongated body due to a usually shallower middle body depth (19.8-26.5 vs. 26.3-35.9% LS ). The other group revealed to be a new species for science, Marcusenius verheyenorum, which can be distinguished from its congeners with eight circumpeduncular scales by the following unique combination of characters: a rounded head with a terminal mouth; a short and deep caudal peduncle (middle caudal-peduncle depth, 44.9-54.6% caudal-peduncle length; LCP ), a deep body (middle body depth, 27.7-34.2% LS ), 38-43 scales on the lateral line, 40-41 vertebrae, 20-21 dorsal-fin rays and 26 anal-fin rays. Some specimens previously attributed to M. moorii were examined and reassigned to M. lambouri or M. verheyenorum. As a result, M. moorii and M. lambouri occur in sympatry in the middle Congo Basin, with the distribution area of M. moorii still further extending into the lower Congo Basin. Instead, the distribution of M. verheyenorum is limited to some right bank tributaries of the upstream part of the middle Congo Basin. Two museum records from the Lilanda River (YBR), collected in the 1950s and previously identified as M. moorii, were re-identified as belonging to the new species, M. verheyenorum. However, the species now seems locally extinct in that region, which reflects the significant anthropogenic effects even within this reserve.© 2019 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.Mambo BabaTaylorTDépartement d'Ecologie et Biodiversité des Ressources Aquatique, Centre de Surveillance de la Biodiversité (CSB), Université de Kisangani, Kisangani, R.D. Congo.KisekelwaTchalondawaTUnité d'Enseignement et de Recherche en Hydrobiologie Appliquée (UERHA), Institut Supérieure Pédagogique (ISP) de Bukavu, Biology-Chemistry Department, Bukavu, R.D. Congo.Vertebrate Section, Ichthyology, Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA), Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Danadu MizaniCélestinCDépartement d'Ecologie et Biodiversité des Ressources Aquatique, Centre de Surveillance de la Biodiversité (CSB), Université de Kisangani, Kisangani, R.D. Congo.DecruEvaEVertebrate Section, Ichthyology, Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA), Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.VrevenEmmanuelEVertebrate Section, Ichthyology, Royal Museum for Central Africa (RMCA), Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.engThis study was made possible thanks to a DEA scholarship (UNIKIS) to T.M.B. within the Mbisa Congo project (2013-2018), financed through a framework agreement project between the RMCA and the Belgian Development Cooperation (CTB/BTC).Journal Article20200213EnglandJ Fish Biol02140550022-1112IMAnimalsBiodiversityCongoElectric Fishanatomy & histologyclassificationMuseumsRiversSpecies SpecificitySympatryM. lambouriM. moorii longulusM. verheyenorumcytbOkapi Wildlife ReserveYangambi Biosphere Reserve201901042019120120191211602020626602019121160ppublish3182044710.1111/jfb.14226REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>An annotated checklist of the fish fauna of the river systems draining the Kahuzi-Biega National Park (Upper Congo: Eastern DR Congo).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Kisekelwa T, Snoeks J, Vreven E<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of fish biologyJ Fish BiolAn annotated checklist of the fish fauna of the river systems draining the Kahuzi-Biega National Park (Upper Congo: Eastern DR Congo).700-72110.1111/jfb.14264The Kahuzi-Biega National Park (KBNP), situated mainly in the Eastern Highlands Ecoregion of the Upper Congo basin, is drained by the Lowa and Ulindi rivers, and some western affluents of Lake Kivu. In this study, the first list of the fish diversity of these systems is provided based on museum collections and complemented, for the Lowa River system and the western Lake Kivu affluents, with recently collected specimens (2013-2017). A total of 118 species are reported from the Lowa basin, 22 from the Ulindi basin and seven from these Lake Kivu affluents. Within the Lowa and Ulindi, respectively, five and one species, all cichlids, have been introduced. Currently, 51 species are reported from within the park, only two of which have been reported from the highlands, i.e., Amphilius kivuensis from the Luha, the source of the Luka River, and Clarias liocephalus from the headwaters of the Lake Kivu' affluents. With a total of 30 species, Cyprinidae is by far the largest family, representing 25% of the total species diversity of the Lowa basin. It is followed by Mormyridae with 13 species (11%), Alestidae and Mochokidae with 10 species each (8%), Clariidae and Amphiliidae with eight species (7%), and Distichodontidae with six species (5%). Seven new species for science were discovered and 11 species were found to be endemic to the Lowa system. Although further exploration is needed, this underscores the importance of the KBNP in protecting the fish fauna of the Lowa basin but also highlights the park's limited coverage of the fish fauna of the Lowa basin.© 2020 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.KisekelwaTchalondawaThttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-4730-5285Royal Museum for Central Africa, Vertebrates Section, Ichthyology, Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Département de Biologie-Chimie, Institut Supérieur Pédagogique, Unité d'Enseignement et de Recherche en Hydrobiologie Appliquée, Bukavu, Democratic Republic of the Congo.SnoeksJosJRoyal Museum for Central Africa, Vertebrates Section, Ichthyology, Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.VrevenEmmanuelERoyal Museum for Central Africa, Vertebrates Section, Ichthyology, Tervuren, Belgium.Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.engThis study is part of the PhD of TK, within the "Mbisa Congo" project (2013-2018), financed through a framework agreement between the RMCA and the Belgian Development Cooperation. The fieldwork of TK was partially financed via a research grant from the International Foundation for Science (IFS n°A5787-1 (2015-2017))Journal Article20200223EnglandJ Fish Biol02140550022-1112IMAnimalsChecklistCongoFishesclassificationLakesParks, RecreationalRiversbiodiversityconservationelevation gradientendemicityfish communitiesichthyofaunal affinities2019102820200122202012860202062660202012860ppublish3198507010.1111/jfb.14264REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>A morphological, molecular, and histopathological redescription of Henneguya nyongensis Fomena & Bouix, 1996 (Cnidaria: Myxobolidae) infecting the gills of Peter's elephantnose fish, Gnathonemus petersii (Günther) (Osteoglossiformes: <b>Mormyridae</b>), imported from Nigeria.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Stilwell JM, Stilwell NK, Camus AC, Griffin MJ, Rosser TG<br><font color=gray><i>Systematic parasitology, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Mormyridae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>