Pubmed    Pubmed Central
uBio Home | uBioRSS

WebSearchLiteratureMolecularImages

 uBio  Web Results 1 - 10 of about 51

Scientific:
   Novaculichthys taeniourus (Mardel) 

Synonyms:
   Labrus taeniourus 
   Novaculichthys taeniorus 
   Novaculichthys taeniourus (Clown wrasse) 
   Novaculichthys taeniurus 
   Novaculichtys taeniorus 
   Noviculichthys taeniourus 

Broader Terms:
   Labrus (wrasses) 
   Novaculichthys 
   Novaculichtys 
   Perciformes (perch-likes) 
 
 


Did you mean: Mardoella ?



1.  Leaching Behavior and Corrosion Inhibition of a Rare Earth Carboxylate Incorporated Epoxy Coating System.LinkIT
Peng Y, Hughes AE, Mardel JI, Deacon GB, Junk PC, Forsyth M, Hinton BRW, Somers AE
ACS applied materials & interfaces, 2019
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  [The clinician: The first of all essential drugs. A defense for clinician medicine and the patient-physician relationship].LinkIT
Thomas M
La Revue de medecine interne, 2016
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Clinical presentation of patients with Ebola virus disease in Conakry, Guinea.LinkIT
Bah EI, Lamah MC, Fletcher T, Jacob ST, Brett-Major DM, Sall AA, Shindo N, Fischer WA, Lamontagne F, Saliou SM, Bausch DG, Moumié B, Jagatic T, Sprecher A, Lawler JV, Mayet T, Jacquerioz FA, Méndez Baggi MF, Vallenas C, Clement C, Mardel S, Faye O, Faye O, Soropogui B, Magassouba N, Koivogui L, Pinto R, Fowler RA
The New England journal of medicine, 2015
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Caring for critically ill patients with ebola virus disease. Perspectives from West Africa.LinkIT
Fowler RA, Fletcher T, Fischer WA, Lamontagne F, Jacob S, Brett-Major D, Lawler JV, Jacquerioz FA, Houlihan C, O'Dempsey T, Ferri M, Adachi T, Lamah MC, Bah EI, Mayet T, Schieffelin J, McLellan SL, Senga M, Kato Y, Clement C, Mardel S, Vallenas Bejar De Villar RC, Shindo N, Bausch D
American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 2014
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Versatile, high quality and scalable continuous flow production of metal-organic frameworks.LinkIT
Rubio-Martinez M, Batten MP, Polyzos A, Carey KC, Mardel JI, Lim KS, Hill MR
Scientific reports, 2014
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

6.  Combining UV lithography and an imprinting technique for patterning metal-organic frameworks. 4701-5 10.1002/adma.201301383 Thin metal-organic framework (MOF) films are patterned using UV lithography and an imprinting technique. A UV lithographed SU-8 film is imprinted onto a film of MOF powder forming a 2D MOF patterned film. This straightforward method can be applied to most MOF materials, is versatile, cheap, and potentially useful for commercial applications such as lab-on-a-chip type devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Doherty Cara M CM CSIRO Division of Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE), Private Bag 33, Clayton South MDC, Victoria 3169, Australia. Cara.Doherty@csiro.au. Grenci Gianluca G Riccò Raffaele R Mardel James I JI Reboul Julien J Furukawa Shuhei S Kitagawa Susumu S Hill Anita J AJ Falcaro Paolo P eng Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2013 07 24 Germany Adv Mater 9885358 0935-9648 UV lithography device fabrication imprinting metal-organic frameworks patterning 2013 03 27 2013 05 21 2013 7 30 6 0 2013 7 31 6 0 2013 7 31 6 1 ppublish 23893365 10.1002/adma.201301383 31145574 NBK541843 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006 2006 Internet Cellulose and Citric Acid eng Review No data are available on cellulose and citric acid use during breastfeeding. However, the drug is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, so it cannot enter the breastmilk. Cellulose and citric acid is acceptable to use during breastfeeding.
Drug Levels and Effects
Substance Identification
citric acid Citro Citretten Aciletten Citric acid, anhydrous Chemfill Hydrocerol A Anhydrous citric acid Kyselina citronova 77-92-9 K-Lyte Caswell No. 221C 2-Hydroxytricarballylic acid K-Lyte/Cl K-Lyte DS FEMA Number 2306 Kyselina citronova [Czech] 1,2,3-Propanetricarboxylic acid, 2-hydroxy- 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid F 0001 (polycarboxylic acid) UNII-XF417D3PSL 2-Hydroxypropanetricarboxylic acid FEMA No. 2306 CCRIS 3292 HSDB 911 XF417D3PSL 3-Carboxy-3-hydroxypentane-1,5-dioic acid EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 021801 NSC 30279 NSC 626579 EINECS 201-069-1 BRN 0782061 AI3-06286 Citric acid, anhydrous [USP:JAN] Kyselina 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propantrikarbonova Kyselina 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propantrikarbonova [Czech] EC 201-069-1 4-03-00-01272 (Beilstein Handbook Reference) cellulose Cupricellulose Pyrocellulose Rayophane Sigmacell Arbocel Kingcot Tomofan Tunicin Abicel alpha-cellulose Avicel Celufi Klucel Rexcel Hydroxycellulose Rayon beta-Amylose Rayon flock Solka-floc Solka-fil MN-Cellulose Sulfite cellulose Rayweb Q Avicel PH Cellex MX Solka-floc BW Fresenius D 6 Cepo CFM Avicel RC/CL Cellulose 248 Chromedia CC 31 Chromedia CF 11 Heweten 10 Cellulose crystalline Cellulose regenerated Spartose OM-22 Wood pulp, bleached CEPO Whatman CC-31 Celphere CP-305 Solka-floc BW 20 Cellulose, total dust Alpha Cel PB 25 Arbocel BC 200 Avicel 101 Avicel 102 Onozuka P 500 Sentry aq mardel clout Avicel CL 611 Avicel PH 101 Avicel PH 105 Elcema F 150 Elcema G 250 Elcema P 050 Elcema P 100 Solka-floc BW 100 Solka-floc BW 200 KO5GYV0DCB UNII-KO5GYV0DCB Microcrystalline cellulose Solka-floc BW 2030 UNII-7T9FYH5QMK UNII-SMD1X3XO9M UNII-W7YXH6D4BD Arbocell B 600/30 7T9FYH5QMK SMD1X3XO9M W7YXH6D4BD Cellulose, microcrystalline UNII-C8DF2GF8L2 UNII-PNR0YF693Y UNII-X7XJ6RM9Q2 CRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE DISPERSIBLE CELLULOSE C8DF2GF8L2 PNR0YF693Y UNII-I355QGZ19A UNII-OP1R32D61U X7XJ6RM9Q2 CEPO S 20 CEPO S 40 Cellulose, respirable fraction UNII-91B875MM4H CCRIS 6600 I355QGZ19A OP1R32D61U Cellulose, microcrystalline [NF] 91B875MM4H LA 01 EINECS 232-674-9 CP-305 9004-34-6
2019 5 31 6 1 2019 5 31 6 1 2019 5 31 6 1 ppublish 31145574
30000929 NBK501869 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006 2006 Internet Gentian Violet eng Review Gentian violet (crystal violet) was used in the past to treat oral and nipple thrush during breastfeeding. Gentian violet is potentially toxic to the mucous membranes, causing ulceration,[1][2][3][4] and potentially tattooing the skin. It can also interact with DNA[5], is carcinogenic and mutagenic in rodents, and occasionally causes allergic sensitization, with cross reactions to other triphenylmethane dyes.[6] Its use has been severely curtailed by authorities in England and Australia.[7][8] It is also very messy, staining skin and clothing. A 2001 survey of the members of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) found that gentian violet is rarely (1 to 2% of respondents) used by breastfeeding experts for initial treatment of oral thrush and is very infrequently (3 to 4% of respondents) used for recurrent or persistent thrush.[9] ABM guidelines for treating Candida infection of the nipples state that an aqueous solution of gentian violet of less than 0.5% can be used for no more than 7 days on the nipple.[10] However, safer alternatives for treating thrush are available.[11]
Drug Levels and Effects
Substance Identification
Crystal violet gentian violet Basic violet 3 Aniline Violet Gentiaverm Pyoktanin Adergon Atmonil Avermin Axuris Vianin Viocid Badil Bismuth Violet Gentioletten Hexamethyl Violet Gentersal Genticid Oxycolor Vermicid Oxiuran Oxyozyl Methyl Violet 10B Meroxyl-Wander Gentianaviolett Meroxylan Basic Violet BN Genapax Meroxyl Meroxylan-Wander Methylrosaniline chloride Hecto Violet R Methylviolett Violet CP Calcozine Violet C Crystal Violet O Paper Blue R Pyoverm Violet XXIII Crystal Violet AO Crystal Violet BP Crystal Violet FN Crystal Violet SS Violet 5BO Violet 6BN Brilliant Violet 5B Blaues pyoktanin Crystal Violet 6B Hexamethylpararosaniline chloride Crystal Violet AON Crystal Violet BPC Crystal Violet USP Methyl Violet 5BO Calcozine Violet 6BN Crystal Violet 5BO Crystal Violet 6BO Crystal Violet HL2 Aizen Crystal Violet methylrosanilinium chloride Hectograph Violet SR Methyl Violet 5BNO Crystal Violet 10B Hidaco crystal Violet Violet cristallise Crystal Violet chloride 548-62-9 Kristall-violett Methyl Violet 10BD Methyl Violet 10BK Methyl Violet 10BN Methyl Violet 10BO Mitsui Crystal Violet C.I. Basic violet 3 Violet gencianova Violet krystalova Methyl Violet 10BNS CI Basic Violet 3 Plastoresin Violet 5BO Crystal Violet Technical Methylrosanilinchlorid 12416 Violet Violet zasadita 3 Aniline Violet Pyoktanine Crystal Violet Pure DSC Crystal Violet Extra Pure Methylrosanilini chloridum Methylviolett [German] Caswell No. 264A Metilrosanilinio cloruro Methylrosanilinii chloridum Methylrosanilinum chloratum Crystal Violet chloride salt Gentianaviolett [German] Cloruro de metilrosanilina Gentian violet [USP] Blaues pyoktanin [German] Kristall-violett [German] Violet gencianova [Czech] Violet krystalova [Czech] Crystal Violet Extra Pure APN Hidaco Brilliant Crystal Violet C.I. Basic Violet 1 HEXAMETHYL-P-ROSANILINE CHLORIDE Aizen Crystal Violet Extra Pure Crystal Violet Extra Pure APNX Violet zasadita 3 [Czech] Crystal Violet Pure DSC Brilliant UNII-J4Z741D6O5 CCRIS 2464 Chlorure de methylrosanilinum Methylrosanilinchlorid [German] NCI-C55969 Metilrosanilinio cloruro [DCIT] Sentry aq mardel quick aid C.I. 42555 Hexamethyl pararosaniline chloride HSDB 4366 Hexamethyl p-rosaniline hydrochloride NSC 3090 CI 42555 EINECS 208-953-6 Methylrosanilinium chloride [INN] Methyl Violet 6B (biological stain) J4Z741D6O5 EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 039502 C.I. Basic Violet 3 (8CI) Methylrosanilinii chloridum [INN-Latin] Cloruro de metilrosanilina [INN-Spanish] Chlorure de methylrosanilinum [INN-French] EC 208-953-6 Pararosaniline, N,N,N',N',N'',N''-hexamethyl-, chloride GVS Methanaminium, N-(4-(bis(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)-N-methyl-, chloride (4-(Bis(p-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)dimethylammonium chloride (4-(4,4'-Bis(dimethylamino)benzhydrylidene)cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-ylidene)dimethylammonium chloride Ammonium, (4-(bis(p-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)dimethyl-, chloride Methanaminium, N-(4-(bis(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)-N-methyl-, chloride (1:1)
2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 ppublish 30000929
30000889 NBK501829 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006 2006 Internet Aloe eng Review Aloe vera gel consists of the clear gel from the center of fresh leaves of Aloe vera and related aloes. Active ingredients include mono- and polysaccharides (e.g., acemannan, glucomannan), allantoin, enzymes (e.g., cyclooxygenase, amylase, lipase, alkaline phosphatase, carboxypeptidase), and salicylic acid. It should not be confused with Aloe latex which comes from the inner portion of the skin and contains potent anthraquinone laxatives. Aloe vera gel has been used topically on the nipples during nursing to help heal cracked nipples. In a randomized, single-blinded study (investigators blinded), aloe vera was more effective than lanolin in decreasing nipple pain score after 7 days in women with sore nipples postpartum.[1] Another study compared breastmilk alone applied to the nipples after breastfeeding to either olive oil or aloe vera gel. All had less pain after 7 days of nursing, but the decrease on pain was greater with aloe vera than with the other treatments.[2] Topical aloe has also been combined with a cactus leaf preparation and massage to treat engorgement.[3] If aloe vera is applied to the nipples, it should be washed off before nursing the infant because the taste might adversely affect nursing or cause diarrhea in the infant.[4][5] No data exist on the safety and efficacy of Aloe vera gel in nursing mothers or infants. Aloe vera gel has caused itching, burning, and allergic contact dermatitis, possibly from contamination with the irritating latex from the leaves.[6][7] Aloe vera gel also has an antiplatelet effect and can enhance the antiplatelet effect of other drugs. Aloe latex, the laxative, should not be used during breastfeeding.[8][9] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to prove the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does not certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information about dietary supplements is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.
Drug Levels and Effects
Substance Identification
Aloe Aloe vera Aloe, powdered Aloe vera gel Pharmaceutical aloe Aloe [Latin] AROE [Japanese] Aloe, pharmaceutical AROE Sentry aq mardel quick aid Aloe extract (Aloe spp.) UNII-ZY81Z83H0X FEMA No. 2047 ZY81Z83H0X Pharmaceutical natural products, aloe 8001-97-6
2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 ppublish 30000889
30000276 NBK501217 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006 2006 Internet Erythromycin
LinkIT
Doherty CM, Grenci G, Riccò R, Mardel JI, Reboul J, Furukawa S, Kitagawa S, Hill AJ, Falcaro P
Advanced materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), 2013 Sep 14 Advanced materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.) Adv. Mater. Weinheim Combining UV lithography and an imprinting technique for patterning metal-organic frameworks. 4701-5 10.1002/adma.201301383 Thin metal-organic framework (MOF) films are patterned using UV lithography and an imprinting technique. A UV lithographed SU-8 film is imprinted onto a film of MOF powder forming a 2D MOF patterned film. This straightforward method can be applied to most MOF materials, is versatile, cheap, and potentially useful for commercial applications such as lab-on-a-chip type devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Doherty Cara M CM CSIRO Division of Materials Science and Engineering (CMSE), Private Bag 33, Clayton South MDC, Victoria 3169, Australia. Cara.Doherty@csiro.au. Grenci Gianluca G Riccò Raffaele R Mardel James I JI Reboul Julien J Furukawa Shuhei S Kitagawa Susumu S Hill Anita J AJ Falcaro Paolo P eng Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2013 07 24 Germany Adv Mater 9885358 0935-9648 UV lithography device fabrication imprinting metal-organic frameworks patterning 2013 03 27 2013 05 21 2013 7 30 6 0 2013 7 31 6 0 2013 7 31 6 1 ppublish 23893365 10.1002/adma.201301383 31145574 NBK541843 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006 2006 Internet Cellulose and Citric Acid eng Review No data are available on cellulose and citric acid use during breastfeeding. However, the drug is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, so it cannot enter the breastmilk. Cellulose and citric acid is acceptable to use during breastfeeding.
Drug Levels and Effects
Substance Identification
citric acid Citro Citretten Aciletten Citric acid, anhydrous Chemfill Hydrocerol A Anhydrous citric acid Kyselina citronova 77-92-9 K-Lyte Caswell No. 221C 2-Hydroxytricarballylic acid K-Lyte/Cl K-Lyte DS FEMA Number 2306 Kyselina citronova [Czech] 1,2,3-Propanetricarboxylic acid, 2-hydroxy- 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid F 0001 (polycarboxylic acid) UNII-XF417D3PSL 2-Hydroxypropanetricarboxylic acid FEMA No. 2306 CCRIS 3292 HSDB 911 XF417D3PSL 3-Carboxy-3-hydroxypentane-1,5-dioic acid EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 021801 NSC 30279 NSC 626579 EINECS 201-069-1 BRN 0782061 AI3-06286 Citric acid, anhydrous [USP:JAN] Kyselina 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propantrikarbonova Kyselina 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propantrikarbonova [Czech] EC 201-069-1 4-03-00-01272 (Beilstein Handbook Reference) cellulose Cupricellulose Pyrocellulose Rayophane Sigmacell Arbocel Kingcot Tomofan Tunicin Abicel alpha-cellulose Avicel Celufi Klucel Rexcel Hydroxycellulose Rayon beta-Amylose Rayon flock Solka-floc Solka-fil MN-Cellulose Sulfite cellulose Rayweb Q Avicel PH Cellex MX Solka-floc BW Fresenius D 6 Cepo CFM Avicel RC/CL Cellulose 248 Chromedia CC 31 Chromedia CF 11 Heweten 10 Cellulose crystalline Cellulose regenerated Spartose OM-22 Wood pulp, bleached CEPO Whatman CC-31 Celphere CP-305 Solka-floc BW 20 Cellulose, total dust Alpha Cel PB 25 Arbocel BC 200 Avicel 101 Avicel 102 Onozuka P 500 Sentry aq mardel clout Avicel CL 611 Avicel PH 101 Avicel PH 105 Elcema F 150 Elcema G 250 Elcema P 050 Elcema P 100 Solka-floc BW 100 Solka-floc BW 200 KO5GYV0DCB UNII-KO5GYV0DCB Microcrystalline cellulose Solka-floc BW 2030 UNII-7T9FYH5QMK UNII-SMD1X3XO9M UNII-W7YXH6D4BD Arbocell B 600/30 7T9FYH5QMK SMD1X3XO9M W7YXH6D4BD Cellulose, microcrystalline UNII-C8DF2GF8L2 UNII-PNR0YF693Y UNII-X7XJ6RM9Q2 CRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE DISPERSIBLE CELLULOSE C8DF2GF8L2 PNR0YF693Y UNII-I355QGZ19A UNII-OP1R32D61U X7XJ6RM9Q2 CEPO S 20 CEPO S 40 Cellulose, respirable fraction UNII-91B875MM4H CCRIS 6600 I355QGZ19A OP1R32D61U Cellulose, microcrystalline [NF] 91B875MM4H LA 01 EINECS 232-674-9 CP-305 9004-34-6
2019 5 31 6 1 2019 5 31 6 1 2019 5 31 6 1 ppublish 31145574
30000929 NBK501869 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006 2006 Internet Gentian Violet eng Review Gentian violet (crystal violet) was used in the past to treat oral and nipple thrush during breastfeeding. Gentian violet is potentially toxic to the mucous membranes, causing ulceration,[1][2][3][4] and potentially tattooing the skin. It can also interact with DNA[5], is carcinogenic and mutagenic in rodents, and occasionally causes allergic sensitization, with cross reactions to other triphenylmethane dyes.[6] Its use has been severely curtailed by authorities in England and Australia.[7][8] It is also very messy, staining skin and clothing. A 2001 survey of the members of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) found that gentian violet is rarely (1 to 2% of respondents) used by breastfeeding experts for initial treatment of oral thrush and is very infrequently (3 to 4% of respondents) used for recurrent or persistent thrush.[9] ABM guidelines for treating Candida infection of the nipples state that an aqueous solution of gentian violet of less than 0.5% can be used for no more than 7 days on the nipple.[10] However, safer alternatives for treating thrush are available.[11]
Drug Levels and Effects
Substance Identification
Crystal violet gentian violet Basic violet 3 Aniline Violet Gentiaverm Pyoktanin Adergon Atmonil Avermin Axuris Vianin Viocid Badil Bismuth Violet Gentioletten Hexamethyl Violet Gentersal Genticid Oxycolor Vermicid Oxiuran Oxyozyl Methyl Violet 10B Meroxyl-Wander Gentianaviolett Meroxylan Basic Violet BN Genapax Meroxyl Meroxylan-Wander Methylrosaniline chloride Hecto Violet R Methylviolett Violet CP Calcozine Violet C Crystal Violet O Paper Blue R Pyoverm Violet XXIII Crystal Violet AO Crystal Violet BP Crystal Violet FN Crystal Violet SS Violet 5BO Violet 6BN Brilliant Violet 5B Blaues pyoktanin Crystal Violet 6B Hexamethylpararosaniline chloride Crystal Violet AON Crystal Violet BPC Crystal Violet USP Methyl Violet 5BO Calcozine Violet 6BN Crystal Violet 5BO Crystal Violet 6BO Crystal Violet HL2 Aizen Crystal Violet methylrosanilinium chloride Hectograph Violet SR Methyl Violet 5BNO Crystal Violet 10B Hidaco crystal Violet Violet cristallise Crystal Violet chloride 548-62-9 Kristall-violett Methyl Violet 10BD Methyl Violet 10BK Methyl Violet 10BN Methyl Violet 10BO Mitsui Crystal Violet C.I. Basic violet 3 Violet gencianova Violet krystalova Methyl Violet 10BNS CI Basic Violet 3 Plastoresin Violet 5BO Crystal Violet Technical Methylrosanilinchlorid 12416 Violet Violet zasadita 3 Aniline Violet Pyoktanine Crystal Violet Pure DSC Crystal Violet Extra Pure Methylrosanilini chloridum Methylviolett [German] Caswell No. 264A Metilrosanilinio cloruro Methylrosanilinii chloridum Methylrosanilinum chloratum Crystal Violet chloride salt Gentianaviolett [German] Cloruro de metilrosanilina Gentian violet [USP] Blaues pyoktanin [German] Kristall-violett [German] Violet gencianova [Czech] Violet krystalova [Czech] Crystal Violet Extra Pure APN Hidaco Brilliant Crystal Violet C.I. Basic Violet 1 HEXAMETHYL-P-ROSANILINE CHLORIDE Aizen Crystal Violet Extra Pure Crystal Violet Extra Pure APNX Violet zasadita 3 [Czech] Crystal Violet Pure DSC Brilliant UNII-J4Z741D6O5 CCRIS 2464 Chlorure de methylrosanilinum Methylrosanilinchlorid [German] NCI-C55969 Metilrosanilinio cloruro [DCIT] Sentry aq mardel quick aid C.I. 42555 Hexamethyl pararosaniline chloride HSDB 4366 Hexamethyl p-rosaniline hydrochloride NSC 3090 CI 42555 EINECS 208-953-6 Methylrosanilinium chloride [INN] Methyl Violet 6B (biological stain) J4Z741D6O5 EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 039502 C.I. Basic Violet 3 (8CI) Methylrosanilinii chloridum [INN-Latin] Cloruro de metilrosanilina [INN-Spanish] Chlorure de methylrosanilinum [INN-French] EC 208-953-6 Pararosaniline, N,N,N',N',N'',N''-hexamethyl-, chloride GVS Methanaminium, N-(4-(bis(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)-N-methyl-, chloride (4-(Bis(p-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)dimethylammonium chloride (4-(4,4'-Bis(dimethylamino)benzhydrylidene)cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-ylidene)dimethylammonium chloride Ammonium, (4-(bis(p-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)dimethyl-, chloride Methanaminium, N-(4-(bis(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene)-N-methyl-, chloride (1:1)
2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 ppublish 30000929
30000889 NBK501829 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006 2006 Internet Aloe eng Review Aloe vera gel consists of the clear gel from the center of fresh leaves of Aloe vera and related aloes. Active ingredients include mono- and polysaccharides (e.g., acemannan, glucomannan), allantoin, enzymes (e.g., cyclooxygenase, amylase, lipase, alkaline phosphatase, carboxypeptidase), and salicylic acid. It should not be confused with Aloe latex which comes from the inner portion of the skin and contains potent anthraquinone laxatives. Aloe vera gel has been used topically on the nipples during nursing to help heal cracked nipples. In a randomized, single-blinded study (investigators blinded), aloe vera was more effective than lanolin in decreasing nipple pain score after 7 days in women with sore nipples postpartum.[1] Another study compared breastmilk alone applied to the nipples after breastfeeding to either olive oil or aloe vera gel. All had less pain after 7 days of nursing, but the decrease on pain was greater with aloe vera than with the other treatments.[2] Topical aloe has also been combined with a cactus leaf preparation and massage to treat engorgement.[3] If aloe vera is applied to the nipples, it should be washed off before nursing the infant because the taste might adversely affect nursing or cause diarrhea in the infant.[4][5] No data exist on the safety and efficacy of Aloe vera gel in nursing mothers or infants. Aloe vera gel has caused itching, burning, and allergic contact dermatitis, possibly from contamination with the irritating latex from the leaves.[6][7] Aloe vera gel also has an antiplatelet effect and can enhance the antiplatelet effect of other drugs. Aloe latex, the laxative, should not be used during breastfeeding.[8][9] Dietary supplements do not require extensive pre-marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Manufacturers are responsible to ensure the safety, but do not need to prove the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplements before they are marketed. Dietary supplements may contain multiple ingredients, and differences are often found between labeled and actual ingredients or their amounts. A manufacturer may contract with an independent organization to verify the quality of a product or its ingredients, but that does not certify the safety or effectiveness of a product. Because of the above issues, clinical testing results on one product may not be applicable to other products. More detailed information about dietary supplements is available elsewhere on the LactMed Web site.
Drug Levels and Effects
Substance Identification
Aloe Aloe vera Aloe, powdered Aloe vera gel Pharmaceutical aloe Aloe [Latin] AROE [Japanese] Aloe, pharmaceutical AROE Sentry aq mardel quick aid Aloe extract (Aloe spp.) UNII-ZY81Z83H0X FEMA No. 2047 ZY81Z83H0X Pharmaceutical natural products, aloe 8001-97-6
2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 2018 7 13 6 1 ppublish 30000889
30000276 NBK501217 National Library of Medicine (US) Bethesda (MD) Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) 2006

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0



1