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Synonyms:
   Lentipes concolor (Hiukole goby) 
   Sicyogaster concolor 

Broader Terms:
   Lentipes (Hiukole gobies) 
   Perciformes (perch-like fishes) 
   Sicyogaster 
 
 
Latest Articles on Lentipes concolor from uBioRSS
Amphidromy and marine larval phase of ancestral gobioids Rhyacichthys guilb... - Marine and Freshwater Research
Influence of seasonal and latitudinal temperature variation on early life-h... - Marine and Freshwater Research


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Common Names: 同色韌鰕虎魚, 半裸韌鰕虎魚, Hi'u kole, 半裸韧鰕虎鱼, 'Alamo'o, Oopu Alamoo, Hu'ukole, 同色韧鰕虎鱼, O'opu alamoo, Alamo'o, O'opu hi'u'ula, O'opu hi'u kole, Hiukole goby, Hi'u'ula, O'opu nu'ukole



1.  Can intensive silvicultural management minimize the effects of frost on restoration plantations in subtropical regions?LinkIT
Turchetto F, Araujo MM, Griebeler AM, Rorato DG, Pasquetti Berghetti ÁL, Barbosa FM, Santos de Lima M
Journal of environmental management, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Anatomical description of the origin and distribution of the lumbosacral plexus in one puma (Puma concolor).LinkIT
Londoño-Osorio A, Ceballos CP, Tamayo-Arango LJ
Anatomia, histologia, embryologia Anat Histol Embryol Anatomical description of the origin and distribution of the lumbosacral plexus in one puma (Puma concolor). 575-580 10.1111/ahe.12571 Wild felids often suffer spinal and limb disorders; however, their nervous system anatomy is poorly studied. Herein, the lumbosacral plexus (Plexus lumbosacralis) of an adult puma and the motor and sensitive innervation of the pelvic limb is described. We found anatomical similarities to other felids, but also some differences. Branches L4-S3 form the lumbosacral plexus (Plexus lumbosacralis) in the puma. The femoral nerve (N. femoris) arises from the union of L4-L5, while in other felids, it is formed by L5-L6. Unlike in the cat, the sartorius muscle receives branches from the saphenous (N. saphenous) and femoral nerves (N. femoris), and the lateral head of the gastrocnemius and superficial digital flexor muscles are innervated by a branch of the soleus muscle. © 2020 Blackwell Verlag GmbH. Londoño-Osorio Andrés A Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Grupo de Investigación CIBAV, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Medellín, Colombia. Ceballos Claudia P CP https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6513-4793 Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Grupo de Investigación GAMMA, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Medellín, Colombia. Tamayo-Arango Lynda J LJ https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1751-3198 Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Grupo de Investigación CIBAV, Escuela de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Medellín, Colombia. eng Journal Article 2020 05 26 Germany Anat Histol Embryol 7704218 0340-2096 IM felids innervation spinal nerves veterinary neuroanatomy wild cats 2019 12 12 2020 04 20 2020 05 06 2020 5 27 6 0 2020 5 27 6 0 2020 5 27 6 0 ppublish 32452572 10.1111/ahe.12571 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>3.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Nodular and sclerosing gastritis caused by Cylicospirura felineus in a puma (Puma concolor).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Almeida LR, D'Elia ML, Sousa DR, Joaquim JS, Santos HA, Campos BH, Pereira CAJ, Soares DFM, Lima WDS, Ecco R<br><font color=gray><i>Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology : Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia Veterinaria, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Study of Trichinella patagoniensis in wild boars.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Bessi C, Ercole ME, Fariña FA, Ribicich MM, Montalvo F, Acerbo M, Krivokapich SJ, Pasqualetti MI<br><font color=gray><i>Veterinary parasitology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The forearm and hand musculature of semi-terrestrial rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and arboreal gibbons (Fam. Hylobatidae). Part I. Description and comparison of the muscle configuration.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Vanhoof MJM, van Leeuwen T, Vereecke EE<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of anatomy J. Anat. The forearm and hand musculature of semi-terrestrial rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and arboreal gibbons (Fam. Hylobatidae). Part I. Description and comparison of the muscle configuration. 10.1111/joa.13222 Primates live in very diverse environments and, as a consequence, show an equally diverse locomotor behaviour. During locomotion, the primate hand interacts with the superstrate and/or substrate and will therefore probably show adaptive signals linked with this locomotor behaviour. Whereas the morphology of the forearm and hand bones have been studied extensively, the functional adaptations in the hand musculature have been documented only scarcely. To evaluate whether there are potential adaptations in forelimb musculature to locomotor behaviour, we investigated the forearm and hand musculature of the highly arboreal gibbons (including Hylobates lar, Hylobates pileatus, Nomascus leucogenys, Nomascus concolor, Symphalangus syndactylus) and compared this with the musculature of the semi-terrestrial rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by performing complete and detailed dissections on a sample of 15 unembalmed specimens. We found that the overall configuration of the upper arm and hand musculature is highly comparable between arboreal gibbons and semi-terrestrial macaques, and follows the general primate condition. Most of the identified differences in muscle configuration are located in the forearm. In macaques, a prominent m. epitrochleoanconeus is present, which potentially helps to extend the forearm and/or stabilize the elbow joint during quadrupedal walking. The m. flexor carpi radialis shows a more radial insertion in gibbons, which might be advantageous during brachiation, as it can aid radial deviation. The fingers of macaques are controlled in pairs by the m. extensor digiti secondi et tertii proprius and the m. extensor digiti quarti et quinti proprius-a similar organization can also be found in their flexors-which might aid in efficient positioning of the hand and fingers on uneven substrates during quadrupedal walking. In contrast, extension of the little finger in gibbons is controlled by a separate m. extensor digiti minimi, whereas digits 2 to 4 are extended by the m. extensor digitorum brevis, suggesting that simultaneous extension of digits 2-4 in gibbons might be important when reaching or grasping an overhead support during brachiation. In conclusion, the overall configuration of the forelimb and hand musculature is very similar in gibbons and macaques, with some peculiarities which can be linked to differences in forelimb function and which might be related to the specific locomotor behaviour of each group. © 2020 Anatomical Society. Vanhoof Marie J M MJM https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4160-5220 Dept. of Development & Regeneration, Biomedical Sciences Group, KU Leuven Campus Kulak, Kortrijk, Belgium. van Leeuwen Timo T https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1782-022X Dept. of Development & Regeneration, Biomedical Sciences Group, KU Leuven Campus Kulak, Kortrijk, Belgium. Vereecke Evie E EE Dept. of Development & Regeneration, Biomedical Sciences Group, KU Leuven Campus Kulak, Kortrijk, Belgium. eng C14/16/082 KU Leuven Journal Article 2020 06 08 England J Anat 0137162 0021-8782 IM adaptation anatomy hylobatids locomotion macaques primates 2020 02 20 2020 04 14 2020 04 29 2020 6 9 6 0 2020 6 9 6 0 2020 6 9 6 0 aheadofprint 32511764 10.1111/joa.13222 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Illegal trade in wild cats and its link to Chinese-led development in Central and South America.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Morcatty TQ, Bausch Macedo JC, Nekaris KA, Ni Q, Durigan CC, Svensson MS, Nijman V<br><font color=gray><i>Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Conserv. Biol. Illegal trade in wild cats and its link to Chinese-led development in Central and South America. 10.1111/cobi.13498 Seizures of hundreds of jaguar heads and canines in Central and South America from 2014 to 2018 resulted in worldwide media coverage suggesting that wildlife traffickers are trading jaguar body parts as substitutes for tiger parts to satisfy the demand for traditional Asian medicine. We compiled a data set of >1000 seized wild cats (jaguar [Panthera onca], puma [Puma concolor], and ocelot [Leopardus pardalis]) from 19 Central and South American countries and China. We ran generalized additive mixed models to detect trends in wild-cat seizures from 2012 to 2018 and assess the effects of socioeconomic factors of source countries and between those countries and China on the number of wild cats seized. Jaguar seizures increased over time, and most of the seized jaguar pieces were canines (1991 of 2117). Around 34% (32 of 93) of the jaguar-part seizure reports were linked with China, and these seizures contained 14-fold more individuals than those intended for domestic markets. Source countries with relatively high levels of corruption and Chinese private investment and low income per capita had 10-50 times more jaguar seizures than the remaining sampled countries. The number of Chinese residents in Central and South America was not significantly related to the number of jaguars seized. No socioeconomic factors influenced the seizures of puma and ocelots. Legal market chains may provide structure for the illegal chain; thus, the influx of illegal jaguar products is potentially a side effect of the economic partnership between Central and South American countries and China. Poverty and high levels of corruption in the source countries may motivate local people to engage in illegal activities and contribute to the growth of this trade. Supply-side interventions to curb this threat to Neotropical wild cats may include improved training for officials and promotion of governance and the value of protecting these animals to local people. © 2020 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology. Morcatty Thais Q TQ https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3095-7052 Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Oxford, OX3 0BP, U.K. RedeFauna - Research Network on Diversity, Conservation and Use of Amazonian Fauna, Brazil. Bausch Macedo Jonathan C JC Independent Consultant, 2221 N Salford Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19131, U.S.A. Nekaris K Anne-Isola KA https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5523-7353 Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Oxford, OX3 0BP, U.K. Ni Qingyong Q https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6979-8020 Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Oxford, OX3 0BP, U.K. College of Animal Sciences and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, 211 Huimin Road, Wenjiang District, Chengdu, 611130, China. Durigan Carlos C CC RedeFauna - Research Network on Diversity, Conservation and Use of Amazonian Fauna, Brazil. Wildlife Conservation Society - Brazil, Rua Costa Azevedo 9, sala 403 - Centro, Manaus, AM, 69010-230, Brazil. Svensson Magdalena S MS https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6149-0192 Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Oxford, OX3 0BP, U.K. Nijman Vincent V https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5600-4276 Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Oxford, OX3 0BP, U.K. eng Journal Article 2020 06 02 United States Conserv Biol 9882301 0888-8892 IM Mercado Ilegal de Felinos Silvestres y su Conexión al Desarrollo Encabezado por China en América Central y América del Sur Resumen La incautación de cientos de cabezas y colmillos de jaguar en América Central y América del Sur entre 2014 y 2018 resultó en una cobertura mediática mundial que sugirió que los traficantes de fauna están comerciando con partes de jaguar como sustituto de las partes de tigre para satisfacer la demanda de la medicina tradicional asiática. Recopilamos un conjunto de datos de más de mil felinos silvestres incautados (jaguar [Panthera onca], puma [Puma concolor], ocelote [Leopardus pardalis]) en 19 países de América Central y América del Sur y en China. Corrimos modelos aditivos mixtos generalizados para detectar las tendencias en las incautaciones de felinos silvestres entre 2012 y 2018 y para evaluar los efectos de los factores socioeconómicos de los países de origen y entre esos países y China sobre el número de felinos silvestres incautados. La incautación de artículos de jaguar incrementó con el tiempo y la mayoría de ellos fueron colmillos (1991 de 2117). Alrededor del 34% (32 de 93) de los reportes de incautación estuvieron vinculados a China y estas incautaciones tenían 14 veces más individuos que las incautaciones de artículos dirigidos al mercado doméstico. Los países de origen con niveles relativamente altos de corrupción y con inversión privada proveniente de China y con un bajo ingreso per cápita tuvieron de 10 a 50 veces más incautaciones de artículos de jaguar que los demás países muestreados. El número de residentes chinos en América Central y en América del Sur no tuvo una relación significativa con el número de jaguares incautados. Ningún factor socioeconómico influyó sobre las incautaciones de pumas y ocelotes. Las cadenas de mercado legales pueden proporcionar una estructura para la cadena ilegal; por lo tanto, la afluencia de productos ilegales de jaguar es potencialmente un efecto colateral de la colaboración económica entre China y los países de América Central y América del Sur. La pobreza y los altos niveles de corrupción en los países de origen pueden motivar a los habitantes locales a participar en actividades ilegales y a contribuir al crecimiento de este mercado. Las intervenciones del lado del suministro para disminuir esta amenaza para los felinos silvestres neotropicales pueden incluir mejoras al entrenamiento para los oficiales y el fomento entre los locatarios de la gestión y el valor de proteger a estos animales. 2014 ? 2018 ???????????????????, ?????????????????????????????????????, ????????????????????? 19 ??????????????? 1000 ???????????, ?????? (Panthera onca) ???? (Puma concolor) ??? (Leopardus pardalis) ???????????????, ?????2012?2018????????????????????, ?????????????????????????????????????????, ?????????????? (1991/2117) ?????????????? 34% (32/93) ???????, ?????????, ????????? 13 ???????????????????????????, ??????????????? 10 ? 50 ?????????????????????????????, ?????????????????????????????????????????????, ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????, ???????????, ????????????????????????????????, ???????????????????????????. Panthera onca colmillos de jaguar incautación jaguar fangs medicina tradicional asiática mercado de fauna seizure traditional Asian medicine trafficking tráfico wildlife trade ?????? ?? ??? (Panthera onca) ???? ?? ?????? 2018 12 09 2019 12 20 2020 03 04 2020 6 3 6 0 2020 6 3 6 0 2020 6 3 6 0 aheadofprint 32484587 10.1111/cobi.13498 Literature Cited, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Mountain goat survival and mortality during a period of increased puma abundance in the Black Hills, South Dakota.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Lehman CP, Rominger EM, Neiles BY<br><font color=gray><i>PeerJ, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>An ecological framework for contextualizing carnivore-livestock conflict.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Wilkinson CE, McInturff A, Miller JRB, Yovovich V, Gaynor KM, Calhoun K, Karandikar H, Martin JV, Parker-Shames P, Shawler A, Van Scoyoc A, Brashares JS<br><font color=gray><i>Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Conserv. Biol. An ecological framework for contextualizing carnivore-livestock conflict. 10.1111/cobi.13469 Carnivore predation on livestock is a complex management and policy challenge, yet it is also intrinsically an ecological interaction between predators and prey. Human-wildlife interactions occur in socioecological systems in which human and environmental processes are closely linked. However, underlying human-wildlife conflict and key to unpacking its complexity are concrete and identifiable ecological mechanisms that lead to predation events. To better understand how ecological theory accords with interactions between wild predators and domestic prey, we developed a framework to describe ecological drivers of predation on livestock. We based this framework on foundational ecological theory and current research on interactions between predators and domestic prey. We used this framework to examine ecological mechanisms (e.g., density-mediated effects, behaviorally mediated effects, and optimal foraging theory) through which specific management interventions operate, and we analyzed the ecological determinants of failure and success of management interventions in 3 case studies: snow leopards (Panthera uncia), wolves (Canis lupus), and cougars (Puma concolor). The varied, context-dependent successes and failures of the management interventions in these case studies demonstrated the utility of using an ecological framework to ground research and management of carnivore-livestock conflict. Mitigation of human-wildlife conflict appears to require an understanding of how fundamental ecological theories work within domestic predator-prey systems. © 2020 Society for Conservation Biology. Wilkinson Christine E CE https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5462-0086 Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. McInturff Alex A Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Miller Jennifer R B JRB Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Defenders of Wildlife, 1130 17th St. NW, Washington DC, 20036, U.S.A. Yovovich Veronica V Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Gaynor Kaitlyn M KM Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Calhoun Kendall K Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Karandikar Harshad H Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Martin Jeff Vance JV Department of Geography, University of California, 505 McCone Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Parker-Shames Phoebe P Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Shawler Avery A Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Van Scoyoc Amy A Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. Brashares Justin S JS Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, 139 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, U.S.A. eng Graduate Research Fellowship National Science Foundation Early Career Grant National Geographic Society Journal Article Review 2020 05 14 United States Conserv Biol 9882301 0888-8892 IM Un Marco de Trabajo Ecológico para Contextualizar el Conflicto Carnívoro - Ganado Resumen La depredación del ganado por carnívoros es un reto complejo para el manejo y las políticas, a pesar de que es intrínsecamente una interacción ecológica entre depredadores y presas. Las interacciones entre humanos y la fauna ocurren en sistemas socio-ecológicos en los que los humanos y los procesos ambientales están conectados estrechamente. Sin embargo, el conflicto humano - fauna subyacente y la clave para desenredar su complejidad son mecanismos ecológicos complejos e identificables que resultan en eventos de depredación. Para tener un mejor entendimiento sobre cómo la teoría ecológica armoniza con las interacciones entre los depredadores silvestres y la presa doméstica, desarrollamos un marco de trabajo para describir las causantes ecológicas de la depredación del ganado. Basamos este marco de trabajo en las principales teorías ecológicas y las investigaciones actuales sobre las interacciones entre los depredadores y las presas domésticas. Usamos este marco de trabajo para examinar los mecanismos ecológicos (es decir, los efectos mediados por la densidad, los efectos mediados por el comportamiento, y la teoría del forrajeo óptimo) mediante los cuales operan ciertas intervenciones específicas de manejo y analizamos las determinantes ecológicas del fracaso y el éxito de las intervenciones de manejo en tres estudios de caso: el leopardo de las nieves (Panthera uncia), el lobo (Canis lupus), y el puma (Puma concolor). Los éxitos y fracasos variados y dependientes del contexto que sufrieron las intervenciones de manejo en estos estudios de caso demostraron la utilidad del uso de un marco de trabajo ecológico para aterrizar la investigación y el manejo del conflicto carnívoro - ganado. La mitigación del conflicto humano - fauna parece requerir de un entendimiento sobre cómo funcionan las teorías ecológicas fundamentales dentro del sistema doméstico depredador - presa. ??????????????????????????, ???????????????????????????????????????????????; ??, ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????, ?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? (?????????????????????), ???????????????????????????, ?????? (Panthera uncia) ??? (Canis lupus) ???? (Puma concolor) ????????????????????, ???????????????????????????????????????, ?????????????????????-????????????? ???: ???; ??: ????. carnivore carnívoro conflict management conflicto humano - fauna ecological theory ganado human-wildlife conflict livestock manejo de conflictos teoría ecológica ???? ???? ?? ????? ???? 2018 08 19 2019 01 31 2019 02 04 2020 5 15 6 0 2020 5 15 6 0 2020 5 15 6 0 aheadofprint 32406970 10.1111/cobi.13469 Literature Cited, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Linking human and ecological components to understand human-wildlife conflicts across landscapes and species.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Teixeira L, Tisovec-Dufner KC, Marin GL, Marchini S, Dorresteijn I, Pardini R<br><font color=gray><i>Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Second-growth and small forest clearings have little effect on the temporal activity patterns of Amazonian phyllostomid bats.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Rocha R, López-Baucells A, Farneda FZ, Ferreira DF, Silva I, Acácio M, Palmeirim JM, Meyer CFJ<br><font color=gray><i>Current zoology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Lentipes+concolor&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Lentipes+concolor&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Lentipes+concolor&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png 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