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Broader Terms:
   Gracilicutes 
   Gram 

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   Chlorobia 
   Chloroflexa 
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Latest Articles on Gram negative walls from uBioRSS




1.  Antibacterial effect of Blumea balsamifera DC. essential oil against Haemophilus parasuis.LinkIT
He C, Yang P, Wang L, Jiang X, Zhang W, Liang X, Yin L, Yin Z, Geng Y, Zhong Z, Song X, Zou Y, Li L, Lv C
Archives of microbiology, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Lysins breaking down the walls of Gram-negative bacteria, no longer a no-go.LinkIT
Gutiérrez D, Briers Y
Current opinion in biotechnology, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Synthesis of silver-cerium titanate nanotubes and their surface properties and antibacterial applications.LinkIT
Sales DA, Marques TMF, Ghosh A, Gusmão SBS, Vasconcelos TL, Luz-Lima C, Ferreira OP, Hollanda LM, Lima IS, Silva-Filho EC, Dittz D, Lobo AO, Viana BC
Materials science & engineering. C, Materials for biological applications, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Prokaryotic single-cell RNA sequencing by in situ combinatorial indexing.LinkIT
Blattman SB, Jiang W, Oikonomou P, Tavazoie S
Nature microbiology, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Effects of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli. 102029 S1572-1000(20)30383-5 10.1016/j.pdpdt.2020.102029 This study used Electron Cryo-tomography (ECT) and fluorescent images to evaluate antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) on the envelope architecture of a Gram-negative bacteria and the effects of combined therapy of aPDT and antibiotics. Standard and clinical suspension of Escherichia coli were submitted to photodynamic treatment with methylene blue solution (100µM) and a 100?mW LED emitting at 660?nm with 3 and 18?J of energy. As a control group, a suspension of E. coli was submitted to penicillin V for 60?min at 30?°C, to compare the damage in cell wall structure. After treatment, ECT images were collected and E. coli biofilms were grown in glass-cover slides and stained with live/dead staining for fluorescence analysis before and after treatments. Bacteria were also submitted to disc diffusion and MIC50 tests with Ampicillin, Amoxicillin?+?Clavulanic acid, Clindamycin and Erythromycin. For in vivo experiment Galleria mellonella larvae were infected with E. coli and treated with antibiotics, aPDT or combined therapy. ECT images presented damage to cell walls and vesicles structures inside and outside the bacteria and fluorescent images showed dose dependent effect of aPDT. Antibiotic or aPDT alone did not improve the survival of caterpillars, but the combined therapy significantly increased survival curve. ECT and fluorescent images shows that aPDT seems to promote micro-damages to cell envelope and causes the production of membrane vesicles permeabilizing cell membranes. The results showed that pre-treating bacterial cells with a photosensitizer and light make them more susceptible to antibiotics and could be an alternative to local infection treatment by resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V. Garcez Aguinaldo S AS Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. Electronic address: aguinaldo.garcez@slmandic.edu.br. Kaplan Mohammed M Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. Jensen Grant J GJ Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. Scheidt Fábio R FR Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. Oliveira Eduardo M EM Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. Suzuki Selly S SS Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. eng Journal Article 2020 09 24 Netherlands Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther 101226123 1572-1000 IM Electron Cryo-tomography PDT antibiotics methylene blue 2020 05 05 2020 09 16 2020 09 18 2020 9 27 20 25 2020 9 28 6 0 2020 9 28 6 0 aheadofprint 32980553 S1572-1000(20)30383-5 10.1016/j.pdpdt.2020.102029 32965827 NBK562156 StatPearls Publishing Treasure Island (FL) StatPearls 2020 01 2020 01 Internet Gram StainingLinkIT
Garcez AS, Kaplan M, Jensen GJ, Scheidt FR, Oliveira EM, Suzuki SS, , Tripathi N, Sapra A
Photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapy, 2020 Sep 24 Photodiagnosis and photodynamic therapy Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther Effects of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli. 102029 S1572-1000(20)30383-5 10.1016/j.pdpdt.2020.102029 This study used Electron Cryo-tomography (ECT) and fluorescent images to evaluate antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) on the envelope architecture of a Gram-negative bacteria and the effects of combined therapy of aPDT and antibiotics. Standard and clinical suspension of Escherichia coli were submitted to photodynamic treatment with methylene blue solution (100µM) and a 100?mW LED emitting at 660?nm with 3 and 18?J of energy. As a control group, a suspension of E. coli was submitted to penicillin V for 60?min at 30?°C, to compare the damage in cell wall structure. After treatment, ECT images were collected and E. coli biofilms were grown in glass-cover slides and stained with live/dead staining for fluorescence analysis before and after treatments. Bacteria were also submitted to disc diffusion and MIC50 tests with Ampicillin, Amoxicillin?+?Clavulanic acid, Clindamycin and Erythromycin. For in vivo experiment Galleria mellonella larvae were infected with E. coli and treated with antibiotics, aPDT or combined therapy. ECT images presented damage to cell walls and vesicles structures inside and outside the bacteria and fluorescent images showed dose dependent effect of aPDT. Antibiotic or aPDT alone did not improve the survival of caterpillars, but the combined therapy significantly increased survival curve. ECT and fluorescent images shows that aPDT seems to promote micro-damages to cell envelope and causes the production of membrane vesicles permeabilizing cell membranes. The results showed that pre-treating bacterial cells with a photosensitizer and light make them more susceptible to antibiotics and could be an alternative to local infection treatment by resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V. Garcez Aguinaldo S AS Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. Electronic address: aguinaldo.garcez@slmandic.edu.br. Kaplan Mohammed M Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. Jensen Grant J GJ Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. Scheidt Fábio R FR Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. Oliveira Eduardo M EM Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. Suzuki Selly S SS Department of oral Microbiology, São Leopoldo Mandic Institute and Research Center, Campinas, Brazil. eng Journal Article 2020 09 24 Netherlands Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther 101226123 1572-1000 IM Electron Cryo-tomography PDT antibiotics methylene blue 2020 05 05 2020 09 16 2020 09 18 2020 9 27 20 25 2020 9 28 6 0 2020 9 28 6 0 aheadofprint 32980553 S1572-1000(20)30383-5 10.1016/j.pdpdt.2020.102029 32965827 NBK562156 StatPearls Publishing Treasure Island (FL) StatPearls 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

6.  Antimicrobial Properties of the Polyaniline Composites against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae.LinkIT
Maruthapandi M, Saravanan A, Luong JHT, Gedanken A
Journal of functional biomaterials, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

7.  Developing a Coarse-Grained Model for Bacterial Cell Walls: Evaluating Mechanical Properties and Free Energy Barriers.LinkIT
Vaiwala R, Sharma P, Puranik M, Ayappa KG
Journal of chemical theory and computation, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

8.  Semisynthesis of a Bacterium with Non-canonical Cell-Wall Cross-Links.LinkIT
Dik DA, Zhang N, Chen JS, Webb B, Schultz PG
Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

9.  Biological properties and structural characterization of a novel rhamnolipid like-biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei TM1B.LinkIT
Mouafo HT, Mbawala A, Somashekar D, Tchougang HM, Harohally NV, Ndjouenkeu R
Biotechnology and applied biochemistry Biotechnol Appl Biochem Biological properties and structural characterization of a novel rhamnolipid like-biosurfactants produced by Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei TM1B. 10.1002/bab.1966 Biosurfactants are microbial surface-active compounds with antimicrobial and antioxidant activities that display a range of physiological functions. In this study, a strain isolated from a Cameroonian fermented milk "pendidam" and identified as Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei TM1B was used for biosurfactants production. The biosurfactants produced by L. casei TM1B with molasses as the substrate had a good surface (40.77 mN/m) and emulsifying (84.50%) activities. The scavenging of the ABTS+? radical (IC50 value of 0.60 ± 0.03 mg/mL) by the biosurfactants was found to be higher than that of DPPH? radical (IC50 value of 0.97 ± 0.13 mg/mL). The maximum chelating activity of biosurfactants (82.29%) was observed at 3.5 mg/mL. The biologically active compound of the biosurfactants produced by L. casei TM1B was identified as 2,5-O-methylrhamnofuranosyl-palmitate, a novel rhamnolipid-like biosurfactant by using chemical, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and NMR analysis. The biosurfactants were bactericidal against several Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens (minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 3.22 to 12.83 mg/mL), and scanning electron microscope analysis revealed bacterial cell walls and membranes as main targets. © 2020 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. Mouafo Hippolyte T HT Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, National School of Agro-Industrial Sciences, University of Ngaoundéré, Ngaoundéré, Cameroon. Centre for Food and Nutrition Research, Institute of Medical Research and Medicinal Plants Studies, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Mbawala Augustin A Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, National School of Agro-Industrial Sciences, University of Ngaoundéré, Ngaoundéré, Cameroon. Somashekar Devappa D https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6767-1453 Department of Microbiology and Fermentation Technology, CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, India. Tchougang Hervé M HM Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, National School of Agro-Industrial Sciences, University of Ngaoundéré, Ngaoundéré, Cameroon. Harohally Nanishankar V NV Spice and Flavour Science Department, CSIR-Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore, India. Ndjouenkeu Robert R Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, National School of Agro-Industrial Sciences, University of Ngaoundéré, Ngaoundéré, Cameroon. eng 3240293592 Academy of Sciences for the Developing World Journal Article 2020 06 04 United States Biotechnol Appl Biochem 8609465 0885-4513 IM Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei TM1B antimicrobial activity antioxidant activity biosurfactants rhamnolipid structural characterization 2019 11 08 2020 05 30 2020 6 5 6 0 2020 6 5 6 0 2020 6 5 6 0 aheadofprint 32497351 10.1002/bab.1966 References, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=rtal.png border=0></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>