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Synonyms:
   Esox lucius (Great northern pickerel) 
   Esox reichertii (Amur pike) 

Broader Terms:
   Esociformes (pikes) 
   Esox (pikes) 

More Specific:
   Esox lucius aralensis 
   Esox lucius atrox 
   Esox lucius bergi 
   Esox lucius lucius wiliunensis 
   Esox lucius variegatus 
 
 
Latest Articles on Esox lucius from uBioRSS
Morphological and molecular evidence of three species of pikes Esox spp. (A... - PubMed: nov sp species
Circumpolar phylogeography of the northern pike ( Esox lucius ) and its rel... - Frontiers in Zoology


Esox lucius
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Common Names: Brouchet, Flußhecht, sheoak, Brouché, Jack, Pike, Gedda, Snook, Brouchetta, Common pike, Brochet du nord, Wolf, Ihok, snoek, Cinoseo, Csuka, Gädda, Pickerel, Jackfish, Gedde, Bec de canard, Europäischer Hecht, Cinosa, Cinusèw, American pike ....



1.  Perfluoroalkyl Substance Contamination Levels of Pike (Esox lucius L.) and Roach (Rutilus rutilus L.) from Selected Masurian Lakes in Eastern Europe.LinkIT
Surma M, Hliwa P, Sznajder-Katarzy?ska K, Wiczkowski W, Topolska J, Zieli?ski H
Environmental toxicology and chemistryEnviron Toxicol ChemPerfluoroalkyl Substance Contamination Levels of Pike (Esox lucius L.) and Roach (Rutilus rutilus L.) from Selected Masurian Lakes in Eastern Europe.3317-332710.1002/etc.5223Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are of increased concern because of their bioaccumulation in humans and the biota, the health risk they pose to humans and other animals, and their persistence in the environment. In the present study, the occurrence of PFAS in selected tissues from pike (Esox lucius L.) and roach (Rutilus rutilus L.) collected from two lakes in the Masurian Lake District (Poland) in eastern Europe was addressed. Ten PFAS were analyzed in the tissue of the brain, liver, kidneys, gonads, and muscles by micro-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Only perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid, and perfluorodecanoic acid were detected above the limit of quantification. Concentrations in pike and roach from E?ckie Lake and Ha?cza Lake were estimated to be 14/27 and 4.4/3.2?ng/g wet weight, respectively. The contributions of PFOS and PFOA to the sum of PFAS calculated for particular tissues for each fish species were higher than those of the other analyzed compounds: PFOS was found to be predominant in fish from E?ckie Lake, whereas PFOA predominated in fish from Ha?cza Lake. It was noted that PFAS concentrations in tissues declined in the following order: kidney?>?gonads???brain?>?liver?>?muscle. The sum of the greatest estimated PFAS concentration was 9.7?ng/g wet weight in kidneys of pike collected from Ha?cza Lake. No correlation was noted between PFAS concentration and fish size. The information provided in our study gives a better understanding of the potential dependencies in PFAS distribution and accumulation in biota. Environ Toxicol Chem 2021;40:3317-3327. © 2021 SETAC.© 2021 SETAC.SurmaMagdalenaMhttp://orcid.org/0000-0001-8266-1619Department of Plant Products Technology and Nutrition Hygiene, Malopolska Centre of Food Monitoring, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Krakow, Poland.HliwaPiotrPDepartment of Ichthyology and Aquaculture, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Olsztyn, Poland.Sznajder-Katarzy?skaKatarzynaKDepartment of Plant Products Technology and Nutrition Hygiene, Malopolska Centre of Food Monitoring, Faculty of Food Technology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Krakow, Poland.WiczkowskiWies?awWDepartment of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Olsztyn, Poland.TopolskaJoannaJDepartment of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Olsztyn, Poland.Zieli?skiHenrykHDepartment of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Olsztyn, Poland.eng2015/17/B/NZ9/01623Narodowe Centrum NaukiNational Science CentreJournal Article20211103United StatesEnviron Toxicol Chem83089580730-7268IMAquatic organismsMicro-HPLC-MS/MSPerfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)QuEChERSTissue distribution20210917202104152021092520219296020219296020219281730ppublish3458258010.1002/etc.5223REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>2.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>A Multi-Life Stage Comparison of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity on the Early Development of Three Canadian Fish Species.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Schultz DR, Tang S, Miller C, Gagnon D, Shekh K, Alcaraz AJG, Janz DM, Hecker M<br><font color=gray><i>Environmental toxicology and chemistryEnviron Toxicol ChemA Multi-Life Stage Comparison of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity on the Early Development of Three Canadian Fish Species.3337-335010.1002/etc.5210Information on the effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in fish has mostly been generated from standard laboratory species and short-term toxicity tests. However, there is significant uncertainty regarding AgNP toxicity to native species of concern in North America, particularly in northern freshwater ecosystems. We assessed the chronic toxicity of AgNPs in early life stages of three North American fish species: rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and northern pike (Esox lucius). Newly fertilized embryos were exposed to nominal aqueous concentrations of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10.0, or 30.0?nM AgNPs for 126 (rainbow trout), 210 (lake trout), and 25 (northern pike) days. Endpoints included cumulative developmental time (°C?×?day or degree-days to 50% life-stage transition), mortality, fork length, embryonic malformations, cumulative survival, and histopathology of gill and liver in larvae/alevins. The results showed life stage-specific differences in responses, with endpoints during the embryonic stage occurring more often and at lower concentrations compared to larval/alevin and juvenile stages. Sensitivities among species were highly dependent on the endpoints measured, although developmental time appeared to be the most consistent endpoint across species. At embryonic and larval/alevin stages, northern pike was the most sensitive species (lowest observable effect concentration of 0.1?nM using developmental time). Rainbow trout displayed similar responses to lake trout across multiple endpoints and therefore seems to be an adequate surrogate for trout species in ecotoxicology studies. Moreover, while mortality during individual life stages was not generally affected, the cumulative mortality across life stages was significantly affected, which highlights the importance of chronic, multi-life-stage studies. Environ Toxicol Chem 2021;40:3337-3350. © 2021 SETAC.© 2021 SETAC.SchultzDayna RDRhttp://orcid.org/0000-0002-3348-0093Toxicology Graduate Program, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.TangSongSSchool of the Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.MillerChristieCToxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.GagnonDanielleDToxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.ShekhKamranKToxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.AlcarazAlper J GAJGhttp://orcid.org/0000-0002-3213-6805Toxicology Graduate Program, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.JanzDavid MDMToxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.HeckerMarkusMToxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.School of the Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.engJournal Article20211025United StatesEnviron Toxicol Chem83089580730-7268IMDevelopmental toxicityEmerging contaminantsEsox luciusOncorhynchus mykissSalvelinus namaycush20210310202102102021090820219116020219116020219101726ppublish3450665010.1002/etc.5210REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>3.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Novel and legacy per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in freshwater sporting fish from background and firefighting foam impacted ecosystems in Eastern Canada.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Kaboré HA, Goeury K, Desrosiers M, Vo Duy S, Liu J, Cabana G, Munoz G, Sauvé S<br><font color=gray><i>The Science of the total environment, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Season and species influence stable isotope ratios between lethally and non-lethally sampled tissues in freshwater fish.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Roberts KN, Lund T, Hayden B, Poesch M<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of fish biologyJ Fish BiolSeason and species influence stable isotope ratios between lethally and non-lethally sampled tissues in freshwater fish.10.1111/jfb.14939The field of stable isotope ecology is moving away from lethal sampling (internal organs and muscle) towards non-lethal sampling (fins, scales and epidermal mucus). Lethally and non-lethally sampled tissues often differ in their stable isotope ratios due to differences in metabolic turnover rate and isotopic routing. If not accounted for when using non-lethal tissues, these differences may result in inaccurate estimates of resource use and trophic position derived from stable isotopes. To address this, the authors tested whether tissue type, season and their interaction influence the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of fishes and whether estimates of species trophic position and resource use are affected by tissue type, season and their interaction. This study developed linear conversion relationships between two fin types and dorsal muscle, accounting for seasonal variation. The authors focused on three common temperate freshwater fishes: northern pike Esox lucius, yellow perch Perca flavescens and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis. They found that fins were enriched in 13 C and depleted in 15 N compared to muscle in all three species, but the effect of season and the interaction between tissue type and season were species and isotope dependent. The estimates of littoral resource use based on fin isotope ratios were between 13% and 36% greater than those based on muscle across species. Season affected this difference for some species, suggesting the potential importance of using season-specific conversions when working with non-lethal tissues. Fin and muscle stable isotopes produced similar estimates of trophic position for northern pike and yellow perch, but fin-based estimates were 0.2-0.4 trophic positions higher than muscle-based estimates for lake whitefish. The effect of season was negligible for estimates of trophic position in all species. Strong correlations existed between fin and muscle ?13 C and ?15 N values for all three species; thus, linear conversion relationships were developed. The results of this study support the use of non-lethal sampling in stable isotope studies of fishes. The authors suggest that researchers use tissue conversion relationships and account for seasonal variation in these relationships when differences between non-lethal tissues and muscle, and seasonal effects on those differences, are large relative to the scale of isotope values under investigation and/or the trophic discrimination factors under use.© 2021 Fisheries Society of the British Isles.RobertsKarling NKNhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1241-7922Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.LundTaylorTDepartment of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.HaydenBrianBhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-8524-7373Canadian Rivers Institute, Biology Department, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada.PoeschMarkMhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-7452-8180Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.engNatural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of CanadaMitacsJournal Article20211105EnglandJ Fish Biol02140550022-1112IMcarbonlake whitefishnitrogennorthern pikeresource usetissue conversiontrophic positionyellow perch20211025202103162021110120211166020211166020211151218aheadofprint3473913810.1111/jfb.14939REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Size, connectivity and edge effects of stream habitats explain spatio-temporal variation in brown trout (<i>Salmo trutta</i>) density.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Tamario C, Degerman E, Polic D, Tibblin P, Forsman A<br><font color=gray><i>Proceedings. Biological sciences, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Field and laboratory characterization of rotenone attenuation in eight lakes of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Couture JM, Redman ZC, Bozzini J, Massengill R, Dunker K, Briggs BR, Tomco PL<br><font color=gray><i>Chemosphere, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>DNA Transposon Expansion is Associated with Genome Size Increase in Mudminnows.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Lehmann R, Kova?ík A, Ocalewicz K, Kirtiklis L, Zuccolo A, Tegner JN, Wanzenböck J, Bernatchez L, Lamatsch DK, Symonová R<br><font color=gray><i>Genome biology and evolution, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Angler and environmental influences on walleye Sander vitreus and muskellunge Esox masquinongy angler catch in Escanaba Lake, Wisconsin 2003-2015.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Shaw SL, Renik KM, Sass GG<br><font color=gray><i>PloS one, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The Comparison of Fatty Acid Composition and Lipid Quality Indices of Roach, Perch, and Pike of Lake Gusinoe (Western Transbaikalia).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Bazarsadueva SV, Radnaeva LD, Shiretorova VG, Dylenova EP<br><font color=gray><i>International journal of environmental research and public health, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Predator biomass and vegetation influence the coastal distribution of threespine stickleback morphotypes.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Yanos CL, Haanstra EP, Colgan Carey F, Passmore SA, Eklöf JS, Bergström U, Hansen JP, Fontaine MC, Maan ME, Eriksson BK<br><font color=gray><i>Ecology and evolution, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Esox+lucius&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a 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