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Synonyms:
   Colobinae (Colobid Monkeys) 

Broader Terms:
   Cercopithecidae (Old World Monkeys) 
   Colobinae (Leaf-monkeys) 

More Specific:
   Colobus (Black-and-White Colobus Monkeys) 
   Nasalis (Snub-nosed Langurs) 
   Presbytis (Leaf-monkeys) 
   Procolobus (Red-and-Olive Colobuses) 
   Pygathrix (Snub-nosed Monkeys) 
   Semnopithecus (Sacred Langurs) 
   Trachypithecus (Dusky Langurs or Leaf-monkeys) 
 
 
Latest Articles on Colobinae from uBioRSS
First joint record of Mesopithecus and cf. Macaca in the Miocene of Europe. - PubMed: species
Old World monkeys of choice - Scientific American - Official RSS Feed


Semnopithecus entellus
Vladimr Motyka - BioLib

External Resources:

Did you mean: Colobina ?

Common Names: Тонкотелые обезьяны, Colobid Monkeys, Leaf-monkeys



1.  Impact of bacterial aerosol, particulate matter, and microclimatic parameters on animal welfare in Chorzów (Poland) zoological garden.LinkIT
Grzyb J, Pawlak K
Environmental science and pollution research international, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Mesopithecus pentelicus from Zhaotong, China, the easternmost representative of a widespread Miocene cercopithecoid species.LinkIT
Jablonski NG, Ji X, Kelley J, Flynn LJ, Deng C, Su DF
Journal of human evolution, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Variation in the strength of allometry drives rates of evolution in primate brain shape.LinkIT
Sansalone G, Allen K, Ledogar JA, Ledogar S, Mitchell DR, Profico A, Castiglione S, Melchionna M, Serio C, Mondanaro A, Raia P, Wroe S
Proceedings. Biological sciences, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Data on First Record of Brown Morph Banded Langur (Presbytis femoralis), Leucistic Dusky Leaf Monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus) in Malaysia and Review of Morph Diversity in Langur (Colobinae).LinkIT
Najmuddin MF, Haris H, Othman N, Zahari F, Mohd-Ridwan AR, Md-Zain BM, Shahrool-Anuar R, Ayeb O, Othman I, Abdul-Latiff MAB
Data in brief, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Differences in the gut microbiota between Cercopithecinae and Colobinae in captivity.LinkIT
Huan Z, Yao Y, Yu J, Chen H, Li M, Yang C, Zhao B, Ni Q, Zhang M, Xie M, Xu H
Journal of microbiology (Seoul, Korea), 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

6.  Evolution of the bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 in colobines.LinkIT
Purba LHPS, Widayati KA, Suzuki-Hashido N, Itoigawa A, Hayakawa T, Nila S, Juliandi B, Suryobroto B, Imai H
Primates; journal of primatology, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

7.  Cafeteria-style feeding trials provide new insights into the diet and nutritional strategies of the black snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri): Implications for conservation.LinkIT
Yang Y, Li Q, Garber PA, Grueter CC, Ren G, Wang X, Huang Z, Xiang Z, Xiao W, Behie A
American journal of primatology Am. J. Primatol. Cafeteria-style feeding trials provide new insights into the diet and nutritional strategies of the black snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri): Implications for conservation. e23108 10.1002/ajp.23108 Anthropogenic changes and fragmentation of natural habitats often exert a negative effect on resource availability and distribution, and the nutritional ecology and feeding behavior of nonhuman primates. The goals of this study are to examine food choice and to identify the nutritional profile of foods consumed by the Critically Endangered black snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus strykeri). To accomplish our study goals, we presented cafeteria-style feeding trials of fresh food items collected in the home range of wild black snub-nosed monkeys to the only two captive R. strykeri, and compared the nutritional profiles of the leafy foods (buds, young, and mature leaves, 100 i23tems from 70 plant species) selected with those avoided (54 items from 48 plant species). Overall, the results indicate that captive R. strykeri selected foods that were higher in moisture (Mo; 77.7%), crude protein (CP; 21.2%), total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC; 34.9%), and phosphorus (P; 0.37%) while tending to avoid foods with a neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content of greater than 46.8%. Leaves collected in autumn and selected by the monkeys were characterized by a slightly higher amount of metabolizable energy (ME) than those rejected (1,350?kJ/100?g vs. 1,268?kJ/100?g). In contrast, the protein content of foods collected and consumed during the spring was greater (22.9%) than in autumn (16.4%). Random Forests modeling, an ensemble learning method, indicated that the proportion of Mo, NDF, ME, CP, P, and TNC were among the most important factors in predicting which items were consumed by the captive R. strykeri during spring and autumn. On the basis of the nutritional profile of foods consumed across the two seasons, we identified 18 nutrient-rich native plant species that we recommend for use in ex- and in-situ conservation management and reforestation programs to provide long-term access to a nutritionally adequate diet. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Yang Yin Y 0000-0002-3179-7345 Institute of Eastern-Himalaya Biodiversity Research, Dali University, Dali, Yunnan, China. School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Australian National University, Canberra ACT, Australia. Collaborative Innovation Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation in the Three Parallel Rivers Region of China, Dali, Yunnan, China. Li Qihua Q Yunnan Province Key Lab of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, China. Garber Paul A PA 0000-0003-0053-8356 Department of Anthropology, Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois. Grueter Cyril C CC School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. Ren Guopeng G Institute of Eastern-Himalaya Biodiversity Research, Dali University, Dali, Yunnan, China. Collaborative Innovation Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation in the Three Parallel Rivers Region of China, Dali, Yunnan, China. Wang Xinwen X Lushui Bureau of Gaoligongshan National Nature Reserve, Liuku, Yunnan, China. Huang Zhipang Z Institute of Eastern-Himalaya Biodiversity Research, Dali University, Dali, Yunnan, China. Collaborative Innovation Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation in the Three Parallel Rivers Region of China, Dali, Yunnan, China. Xiang Zuofu Z Institute of Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Biology, Central South University of Forestry & Technology, Changsha, Hunan, China. Xiao Wen W Institute of Eastern-Himalaya Biodiversity Research, Dali University, Dali, Yunnan, China. Collaborative Innovation Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation in the Three Parallel Rivers Region of China, Dali, Yunnan, China. Behie Alison A 0000-0002-7436-3694 School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Australian National University, Canberra ACT, Australia. eng 4885859 ANU Vice-Chancellor's HDR Travel Grant International Rhinopithecus.MMR.2015 Zoological Society for the Conservation of Species and Populations International R61250FW the Australian National University (ANU) Fieldwork Funding for Higher Degree Research (HDR) Students International 31860164 the National Nature Science Foundation of China International 31860168 the National Nature Science Foundation of China International 31670397 the National Nature Science Foundation of China International Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2020 02 25 United States Am J Primatol 8108949 0275-2565 IM Animals Conservation of Natural Resources Diet veterinary Endangered Species Female Food Preferences Nutritive Value Plant Leaves chemistry Presbytini physiology Seasons Myanmar snub-nosed monkey Rhinopithecus strykeri diet selection ex- and in-situ conservation nutritional ecology protein-fiber ratio 2019 04 25 2020 01 18 2020 02 04 2020 2 27 6 0 2020 9 1 6 0 2020 2 27 6 0 ppublish 32100313 10.1002/ajp.23108 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Anogenital distance as a measure of male competitive ability in Rwenzori Angolan colobus.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Teichroeb JA, Stead SM, Edwards PD, Landry F, Palme R, Boonstra R<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of primatology Am. J. Primatol. Anogenital distance as a measure of male competitive ability in Rwenzori Angolan colobus. e23111 10.1002/ajp.23111 Anogenital distance (AGD) is positively correlated to fetal androgen exposure and developmental masculinization in mammals. Independent of overall body size, AGD shows a strong positive correlation with male fertility and in rodents, AGD is a good indicator of male competitive ability and is associated with female choice. We hypothesized that AGD will also predict male competitive ability in non-human primates. To test this, we measured AGD noninvasively with a parallel laser in a wild population of Angolan colobus monkeys (Colobus angolensis ruwenzorii) in Uganda and correlated to it to their social structure. C. angolensis ruwenzorii form a multilevel society with both one-male/multifemale units (OMUs) and multimale/multifemale units (MMUs). We compared AGD in males from five OMUs and six MMUs and related it to their fecal androgen metabolite concentrations, dominance rank and body size, and to the number of females in their unit. Males in OMUs had greater access to females, so were predicted to have longer AGDs, but this was not found. AGD also did not correlate overall with mean fecal androgen metabolites in MMUs. However, AGD was correlated with dominance rank in MMUs, demonstrating that higher-ranking males in these multimale units had longer AGDs. Body size did not show the same relationship with dominance rank, suggesting that male rank was not just a reflection of absolute male size. Our findings indicate that AGD predicts male competitive ability in this species and that it may be a useful correlate throughout the non-human primates. These results also support the idea that prenatal androgen exposure increases the likelihood of the expression of behaviors that maintain high dominance rank. © 2020 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Teichroeb Julie A JA 0000-0002-0908-156X Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Stead Samantha M SM Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Edwards Phoebe D PD Department of Biological Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Landry Florence F Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Palme Rupert R Unit of Physiology, Pathophysiology and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria. Boonstra Rudy R Department of Biological Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. eng RGPIN-2016-05540 Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada International RGPIN-2016-06321 Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada International Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2020 02 21 United States Am J Primatol 8108949 0275-2565 0 Androgens IM Anal Canal anatomy & histology Androgens analysis Animals Body Size Colobus anatomy & histology physiology Competitive Behavior Feces chemistry Female Genitalia, Male anatomy & histology Male Sexual Behavior, Animal physiology Social Behavior Social Dominance Uganda badge of status dominance rank male quality noninvasive measure prenatal androgen exposure 2019 11 22 2020 01 15 2020 02 09 2020 2 23 6 0 2020 9 1 6 0 2020 2 22 6 0 ppublish 32083334 10.1002/ajp.23111 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Reproductive strategy of bachelors in a snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus bieti) all-male unit.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Guo C, Krzton A, Ruan X, Xiang Z, Li M<br><font color=gray><i>Primates; journal of primatology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>First description of male worms of Enterobius (Colobenterobius) serratus (Nematoda: Oxyuridae), the pinworm parasite of proboscis monkeys.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Hasegawa H, Frias L, Peter S, Hasan NH, Stark DJ, Lynn MS, Sipangkui S, Goossens B, Matsuura K, Okamoto M, Macintosh AJJ<br><font color=gray><i>Zootaxa, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Colobinae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; 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