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Synonyms:
   Brookesia (Leaf Chameleon) 

Broader Terms:
   Brookesia (Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesiinae 
   Chamaeleonidae (chameleons) 

More Specific:
   Brookesia ambreensis 
   Brookesia antakarana 
   Brookesia antoetrae (Brygoo's Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia bekolosy 
   Brookesia betschi 
   Brookesia betschii (Blanc's Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia betsileana 
   Brookesia bonsi 
   Brookesia brachyura 
   Brookesia brachyura brachyura 
   Brookesia brachyura ionidesi 
   Brookesia brygooi 
   Brookesia decaryi (Spiny Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia dentata (Toothed Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia ebenaue 
   Brookesia ebenaui (Northem Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia exarmata 
   Brookesia griveaudi (Marojejy Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia ionidesi 
   Brookesia karachi (Naturelle Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia karchei 
   Brookesia kerstenii 
   Brookesia lambertoni (Fito Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia legenderi (Nosy Be Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia legendrei 
   Brookesia lineata 
   Brookesia lolontany 
   Brookesia minima (Minute Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia minor 
   Brookesia nasus (Eiongate Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia nasus nasus 
   Brookesia nasus pauliani 
   Brookesia nchisiensis 
   Brookesia peramata (Antsingy Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia perarmata (Antsingy Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia peyrierasi 
   Brookesia peyrteresa (Antongil Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia platyceps 
   Brookesia platyceps carri 
   Brookesia ramanantsoai (Ramanantsoa's Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia spectrum 
   Brookesia spectrum spectrum 
   Brookesia stumpffi (Plated Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia superciliaris (Brown Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia supercilliaris 
   Brookesia theili 
   Brookesia therezieni (Permet Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia thieli (Domergue's Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia tuberculata (Mountd' Ambre Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia vadoni (Iaraka River Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia valeriae (Rekworthy's Leaf Chameleon) 
   Brookesia valerieae 
 
 
Latest Articles on Brookesia from uBioRSS
Microornamentation of leaf chameleons (Chamaeleonidae: Brookesia, Rhamphole... - Journal of Morphology
The Atlas?Axis Complex in Chamaeleonids (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae), with De... - The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Ana...


External Resources:

Common Names: Leaf Chameleon



1.  Extreme miniaturization of a new amniote vertebrate and insights into the evolution of genital size in chameleons.LinkIT
Glaw F, Köhler J, Hawlitschek O, Ratsoavina FM, Rakotoarison A, Scherz MD, Vences M
Scientific reports, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Armored with skin and bone: A combined histological and ?CT-study of the exceptional integument of the Antsingy leaf chameleon Brookesia perarmata (Angel, 1933).LinkIT
Schucht PJ, Rühr PT, Geier B, Glaw F, Lambertz M
Journal of morphologyJ MorpholArmored with skin and bone: A combined histological and ?CT-study of the exceptional integument of the Antsingy leaf chameleon Brookesia perarmata (Angel, 1933).754-76410.1002/jmor.21135Madagascar's endemic ground-dwelling leaf chameleons (Brookesiinae: Brookesia Gray, 1865 + Palleon Glaw, et al., Salamandra, 2013, 49, pp. 237-238) form the sister taxon to all other chameleons (i.e., the Chamaeleoninae). They possess a limited ability of color change, a rather dull coloration, and a nonprehensile tail assisting locomotion in the leaf litter on the forest floor. Most Brookesia species can readily be recognized by peculiar spiky dorsolateral projections ("Rückensäge"), which are caused by an aberrant vertebral structure and might function as body armor to prevent predation. In addition to a pronounced Rückensäge, the Antsingy leaf chameleon Brookesia perarmata (Angel, 1933) exhibits conspicuous, acuminate tubercle scales on the lateral flanks and extremities, thereby considerably enhancing the overall armored appearance. Such structures are exceptional within the Chamaeleonidae and despite an appreciable interest in the integument of chameleons in general, the morphology of these integumentary elements remains shrouded in mystery. Using various conventional and petrographic histological approaches combined with ?CT-imaging, we reveal that the tubercle scales consist of osseous, multicusped cores that are embedded within the dermis. Based on this, they consequently can be interpreted as osteoderms, which to the best of our knowledge is the first record of such for the entire Chamaeleonidae and only the second one for the entire clade Iguania. The combination of certain aspects of tissue composition (especially the presence of large, interconnected, and marrow-filled cavities) together with the precise location within the dermis (being completely enveloped by the stratum superficiale), however, discriminate the osteoderms of B. perarmata from those known for all other lepidosaurs.© 2020 The Authors. Journal of Morphology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.SchuchtPia JPJ0000-0002-8853-3092Institut für Zoologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Poppelsdorfer Schloss, Bonn, Germany.RührPeter TPT0000-0003-2776-6172AG Morphologische Dynamiken, Institut für Zoologie, Biozentrum, Universität zu Köln, Köln, Germany.Zentrum für Molekulare Biodiversitätsforschung, Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Bonn, Germany.GeierBenediktB0000-0002-2942-2624Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.GlawFrankFSektion Herpetologie, Zoologische Staatssammlung München (ZSM-SNSB), Munich, Germany.LambertzMarkusM0000-0001-8348-9347Institut für Zoologie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Poppelsdorfer Schloss, Bonn, Germany.Sektion Herpetologie, Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Bonn, Germany.engJournal Article20200519United StatesJ Morphol04061250022-2887IMAnimalsBone and Bonesanatomy & histologydiagnostic imagingImaging, Three-DimensionalLizardsanatomy & histologySkinanatomy & histologydiagnostic imagingSpineanatomy & histologycytologyX-Ray Microtomography3D morphologyBrookesiinaeChamaeleonidaehistologyintegumentosteoderm2020031920200412202004172020520602020121560202052060ppublish3242737710.1002/jmor.21135REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>3.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Is variation in tail vertebral morphology linked to habitat use in chameleons?</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Luger AM, Ollevier A, De Kegel B, Herrel A, Adriaens D<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of morphologyJ MorpholIs variation in tail vertebral morphology linked to habitat use in chameleons?229-23910.1002/jmor.21093Chameleons (Chamaeleonidae) are known for their arboreal lifestyle, in which they make use of their prehensile tail. Yet, some species have a more terrestrial lifestyle, such as Brookesia and Rieppeleon species, as well as some chameleons of the genera Chamaeleo and Bradypodion. The main goal of this study was to identify the key anatomical features of the tail vertebral morphology associated with prehensile capacity. Both interspecific and intra-individual variation in skeletal tail morphology was investigated. For this, a 3D-shape analysis was performed on vertebral morphology using ?CT-images of different species of prehensile and nonprehensile tailed chameleons. A difference in overall tail size and caudal vertebral morphology does exist between prehensile and nonprehensile taxa. Nonprehensile tailed species have a shorter tail with fewer vertebrae, a generally shorter neural spine and shorter transverse processes that are positioned more anteriorly (with respect to the vertebral center). The longer tails of prehensile species have more vertebrae as well as an increased length of the processes, likely providing a greater area for muscle attachment. At the intra-individual level, regional variation is observed with more robust proximal tail vertebrae having longer processes. The distal part has relatively longer vertebrae with shorter processes. Although longer, the small size and high number of the distal vertebrae allows the tail to coil around perches.© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.LugerAllison MAM0000-0002-7318-1178Department of Evolutionary Biology of Vertebrates, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.OllevierAnoukADepartment of Evolutionary Biology of Vertebrates, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.De KegelBarbaraBDepartment of Evolutionary Biology of Vertebrates, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.HerrelAnthonyADepartment of Evolutionary Biology of Vertebrates, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.Département Adaptations du Vivant, Bâtiment d'Anatomie Comparée, UMR 7179 C.N.R.S/M.N.H.N, Paris, France.AdriaensDominiqueDDepartment of Evolutionary Biology of Vertebrates, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.engJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20191228United StatesJ Morphol04061250022-2887IMAnatomic LandmarksAnimalsDiscriminant AnalysisEcosystemLizardsanatomy & histologyMusclesanatomy & histologyPhylogenyPrincipal Component AnalysisSpineanatomy & histologyTailanatomy & histologyChamaeleonidaegrasping abilitymorphologyprehensilityvertebrae20190910201912032019121220191229602020820602019122960ppublish3188314110.1002/jmor.21093REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Microornamentation of leaf chameleons (Chamaeleonidae: <b>Brookesia</b>, Rhampholeon, and Rieppeleon)--with comments on the evolution of microstructures in the Chamaeleonidae.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Riedel J, Böhme W, Bleckmann H, Spinner M<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of morphology, 2015</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Pygmy chameleons of the Rhampholeon platyceps compex (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae): description of four new species from isolated 'sky islands' of northern Mozambique.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Branch WR, Bayliss J, Tolley KA<br><font color=gray><i>Zootaxa, 2014</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The atlas-axis complex in chamaeleonids (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae), with description of a new anatomical structure of the skull.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>?er?anský A, Boistel R, Fernandez V, Tafforeau P, Nicolas le N, Herrel A<br><font color=gray><i>Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007), 2014</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Rivaling the world's smallest reptiles: discovery of miniaturized and microendemic new species of leaf chameleons (<b>Brookesia</b>) from northern Madagascar.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Glaw F, Köhler J, Townsend TM, Vences M<br><font color=gray><i>PloS one, 2012</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Rhabdias (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae) from Chamaeleonidae (Sauria): two new species from Trioceros ellioti in East Africa and one from <b>Brookesia</b> superciliaris in Madagascar.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Lhermitte-Vallarino N, Barbuto M, Junker K, Boistel R, Bain O<br><font color=gray><i>Parasite (Paris, France), 2010</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Mitochondrial genomes of acrodont lizards: timing of gene rearrangements and phylogenetic and biogeographic implications.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Okajima Y, Kumazawa Y<br><font color=gray><i>BMC evolutionary biology, 2010</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Testing species-level diversification hypotheses in Madagascar: the case of microendemic <b>Brookesia</b> leaf chameleons.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Townsend TM, Vieites DR, Glaw F, Vences M<br><font color=gray><i>Systematic biology, 2009</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Brookesia&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Brookesia&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Brookesia&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Brookesia&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>