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Broader Terms:
   Blennioidei (blennies) 
   Perciformes (perch-likes) 
   Percomorpha 

More Specific:
   Adonis (pheasant's eye) 
   Aidablennius 
   Alloblennius 
   Alticops 
   Alticus 
   Andamia 
   Antennablennius 
   Aspidontus 
   Atrisalarias 
   Atrosalarias 
   Bathyblennius 
   Blennechis 
   Blenniella 
   Blenniolus 
   Blennius (blennies) 
   Blennophis 
   Chalaroderma 
   Chasmodes 
   Cirrhipectes 
   Cirripectes 
   Cirripectus 
   Cirrisalarias 
   Coryphoblennius 
   Croaltus 
   Crossosalarias 
   Cruantus 
   Cynoscartes 
   Damania 
   Dasson 
   Dodekablennos 
   Ecenius 
   Ecsenius 
   Enchelyurus 
   Entomacrodus 
   Enucheyurus 
   Escencius 
   Exalias 
   Exallias 
   Fallacirripectes 
   Giffordella 
   Glyptoparus 
   Graviceps 
   Halmabblennius 
   Halmablennius 
   Haptogenys 
   Hirculops 
   Homesthes 
   Hypleurochilus 
   Hypleurochlus 
   Hypsoblennius 
   Ichthyocoris 
   Isesthes 
   Istiblennius 
   Istiblennus 
   Istilbennius 
   Laiphognathus 
   Lioblennius 
   Lipophrys 
   Litobranchus 
   Lophalticus 
   Lupinoblennius 
   Medusablennius 
   Meiacanthus 
   Meicanthus 
   Mimoblennius 
   Nannosalarias 
   Nemophinii 
   Nypleurochilus 
   Oman 
   Omobranchinii 
   Omobranchus 
   Omox 
   Ophioblennius 
   Parablennius 
   Parahypsos 
... 
 
Latest Articles on Blenniidae from uBioRSS


External Resources:

Did you mean: Blenidus or Blennidus?

Common Names: blennies, combtooth blennies, blennies à dents de peigne, borrachos, papillons de mer, blennidés, blennies à dents de peigne, blennidés, scaleless blennies, gonelles



1.  Molecular and morphological description of Myxidium parvum (Cnidaria) from Salaria pavo (Blenniidae) in the Black Sea.LinkIT
Gürkanl? CT, Okkay S, Çiftçi Y, Özer A
Parasitology international, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  DNA reconciles morphology and colouration in the drunk blenny genus Scartichthys (Teleostei: Blenniidae) and provides insights into their evolutionary history.LinkIT
Delrieu-Trottin E, Hartmann-Salvo H, Saenz-Agudelo P, Landaeta MF, Pérez-Matus A
Journal of fish biologyJ Fish BiolDNA reconciles morphology and colouration in the drunk blenny genus Scartichthys (Teleostei: Blenniidae) and provides insights into their evolutionary history.10.1111/jfb.14960The blenniids of the genus Scartichthys are one of the most common fishes of Central and South American Pacific coastal reefs. This being said, Scartichthys spp. remain difficult to identify in the field, and identification is particularly challenging across the c. 6000?km where three of the four currently accepted species are known to occur in sympatry. A reason for this is that the main taxonomic characters from traditional taxonomy are indeed elusive. In addition, at the same time, species can display multiple colour patterns in the field, depending on their ontogenetic stage, habitat association and reproductive behaviour. Overall, molecular characterization is warranted to help address these issues. In this study, the authors have used a novel approach to revise the genus by combining colouration, morphological and molecular data of representative specimens of the four currently valid species and seven described colour patterns. From this, the authors show that only three of the four species should be considered as valid; Scartichthys gigas (Steindachner, 1876), Scartichthys variolatus (Valenciennes, 1836) and Scartichthys viridis (Valenciennes, 1836), whereas Scartichthys crapulatus (Williams, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology, 1990, 492, 1-30) should be synonymized with S. viridis. In the same way, the analyses in this study show that one of the colour patterns attributed so far only to S. gigas is characteristic of the juvenile stages of S. viridis. The time-calibrated phylogeny of this study shows that this genus is relatively young and that the estimated time of divergence between S. gigas and S. viridis is c. 1.71?Ma. In comparison, the Desventuradas and Juan Fernandez Islands endemic S. variolatus diverged c. 1.95?Ma. The results of this study help to clarify the taxonomy of Scartichthys.© 2021 Fisheries Society of the British Isles.Delrieu-TrottinErwanEhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-4120-9316ISEM, CNRS, EPHE, IRD, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier cedex 5, France.Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Berlin, Germany.CEFE, Univ Montpellier, CNRS, EPHE-PSL University, IRD, Montpellier, France.Hartmann-SalvoHansHSubtidal Ecology Laboratory, Estación Costera de Investigaciones Marinas, Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.Saenz-AgudeloPabloPhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8197-2861Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas (ICAEV), Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile.Millennium Nucleus for Ecology and Conservation of Temperate Mesophotic Reef Ecosystem (NUTME).LandaetaMauricio FMFhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-5199-5103Millennium Nucleus for Ecology and Conservation of Temperate Mesophotic Reef Ecosystem (NUTME).Laboratorio de Ictioplancton (LABITI), Instituto de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile.Centro de Observación Marino para Estudios del Ambiente Costero (COSTA-R), Universidad de Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile.Pérez-MatusAlejandroAhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9591-6721Subtidal Ecology Laboratory, Estación Costera de Investigaciones Marinas, Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.Millennium Nucleus for Ecology and Conservation of Temperate Mesophotic Reef Ecosystem (NUTME).eng1151094Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico (FONDECYT)1210216Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico (FONDECYT)1150296Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Científico y Tecnológico (FONDECYT)Journal Article20211125EnglandJ Fish Biol02140550022-1112IMbiogeographyChileintegrative taxonomykelp forestsmolecular phylogenyspecies delimitation2021111720211006202111222021112660202111266020211125855aheadofprint3482138110.1111/jfb.14960REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>3.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Range expansion and complete mitochondrial genome of the highfin blenny (Lupinoblennius nicholsi).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Turner L, Backenstose NJC, Brandl S, Bernal MA<br><font color=gray><i>Molecular biology reports, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Tooth replacement and attachment morphology in the Pacific Leaping Blenny, Alticus arnoldorum (Blenniiformes: <b>Blenniidae</b>: Salariini) with a discussion on tooth function.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Williams KL, Evans KM, Simons AM<br><font color=gray><i>Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007)Anat Rec (Hoboken)Tooth replacement and attachment morphology in the Pacific Leaping Blenny, Alticus arnoldorum (Blenniiformes: Blenniidae: Salariini) with a discussion on tooth function.10.1002/ar.24819Modes of teleost tooth replacement and attachment have historically been described using discrete classification systems that categorize major patterns across taxa. While useful, these discrete classification schemes understate teleost tooth diversity. The "unattached" dentition of salariin combtooth blennies (Blenniiformes: Blenniidae: Salariini) is frequently overlooked due to its perceived complexity, so we examined the Pacific Leaping Blenny, Alticus arnoldorum, to describe this complex morphology. Using a range of methods including histology, SEM, microCT scanning, and clearing and staining, we establish a descriptive model of tooth replacement for A. arnoldorum. We then use our descriptive model of tooth replacement to propose a hypothesis of tooth function in salariin blennies. Our results show that A. arnoldorum exhibits grouped, extraosseous replacement of feeding teeth upon a discontinuous, permanent dental lamina. We also find that tooth replacement occurs within lip tissue that is laterally displaced from the distal margins of the jaw bones, a process previously undocumented in teleost fish. Feeding teeth attach to the dentigerous bone via a primary attachment mode consisting of a continuous collagen band at the posterior base of the teeth, and a secondary attachment mode consisting of epithelial cells. Alticus arnoldorum presents novel modes of tooth replacement and attachment that challenge historical classification modes of teleost dentition. Our descriptive tooth replacement model also provides a reliable framework to propose hypotheses of tooth function that can be applied in future comparative studies on salariin blennies and other long-toothed teleosts to further elucidate the functional role of long-toothed fishes in aquatic ecosystems.© 2021 American Association for Anatomy.WilliamsKeiffer LKLhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-2284-5648Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina, USA.EvansKory MKMDepartment of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA.SimonsAndrew MAMDepartment of Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA.Bell Museum of Natural History, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA.engGans Collections and Charitable FundCompany of BiologistsUniversity of Washington Stephen and Ruth Wainwright Endowed FellowshipAmerican Museum of Natural History Lerner-Gray Memorial FundMinnesota Agricultural Experiment StationBell Museum of Natural History McKinney FundUniversity of Minnesota John Dobie Memorial FellowshipJournal Article20211028United StatesAnat Rec (Hoboken)1012927751932-8486IMBlenniidaedental laminaextraosseous tooth replacementhistologymicroCT202109082021071220210928202110296020211029602021102873aheadofprint3470858210.1002/ar.24819REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Preliminary Investigations into Use of Metomidate for Euthanasia of Ornamental Fishes.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Yanong RPE<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of aquatic animal healthJ Aquat Anim HealthPreliminary Investigations into Use of Metomidate for Euthanasia of Ornamental Fishes.133-13810.1002/aah.10127The goals of this study were to investigate the potential use of metomidate for one-step euthanasia of ornamental fish species representing commonly sold families in the ornamental fish trade and to determine a baseline euthanasia dose for most species tested. Metomidate hydrochloride, a rapid-acting, water-soluble, nonbarbiturate hypnotic related to etomidate, was tested at various concentrations and durations for euthanasia of species representing the following freshwater and marine aquarium fish families: Apogonidae, Ariidae, Blenniidae, Callichthyidae, Characidae, Cichlidae, Cyprinidae, Gobiidae, Gyrinocheilidae, Loricariidae, Melanotaeniidae, Osphronemidae, Pimelodidae, Poeciliidae, Pomacentridae, and Pseudochromidae. Fish in each trial were euthanized as a group (n = 1). Most groups contained 10-12 fish. Some higher doses required buffering. Euthanasia was considered successful if all fish in each group did not recover after 6 h in unmedicated water. All species immediately lost buoyancy and equilibrium, dropping to the tank bottom within 1 min and ceasing ventilation typically within minutes. However, reactivity to vibration, sound, or touch was noticeable for varying time periods afterward (8-66 min), so an additional 30 min of exposure after cessation of reactivity was included as part of the protocol. Although some species (Neon Tetras Paracheirodon innesi and Australian Rainbowfish Melanotaenia australis) were euthanized at a concentration of 40 mg/L metomidate for a total exposure time of 38 min, most species tested were successfully euthanized with metomidate at a concentration of 100 mg/L, with total exposure times ranging from 35-96 min. A few catfish species (Otocinclus sp. and Bronze Corydoras Corydoras aeneus) were refractory and recovered after 100 mg/L. However, Otocinclus sp. were successfully euthanized at 250 mg/L, and Bronze Corydoras were euthanized at 1,000 mg/L. Further studies are needed to provide additional data for these and other species and families, for different water chemistry conditions, and for various biological factors to fine-tune dosing regimens.© 2021 American Fisheries Society.YanongRoy P ERPETropical Aquaculture Laboratory, Program in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest, Fisheries, and Geomatics Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, 1408 24th Street Southeast, Ruskin, Florida, 33570, USA.engJournal ArticleResearch Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.20210704United StatesJ Aquat Anim Health98848810899-7659Z18ZYL8Y51metomidateZ22628B598EtomidateIMAnimalsAustraliaCichlidsEtomidateanalogs & derivativesEuthanasia, AnimalFishes202103042020090820210323202176602021111260202175542ppublish3421927510.1002/aah.10127REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Body shape transformations by alternate anatomical adaptive peak shifts in blenniiform fishes.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Collar DC, DiPaolo ECC, Mai SL, Mehta RS<br><font color=gray><i>Evolution; international journal of organic evolutionEvolutionBody shape transformations by alternate anatomical adaptive peak shifts in blenniiform fishes.1552-156610.1111/evo.14238Extreme body elongation has occurred repeatedly in the evolutionary history of ray-finned fishes. Lengthening of the anterior-posterior body axis relative to depth and width can involve changes in the cranial skeleton and vertebral column, but to what extent is anatomical evolution determined by selective factors and intrinsic constraints that are shared broadly among closely related lineages? In this study, we fit adaptive (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck) evolutionary models to body shape and its anatomical determinants and identified two instances of extreme elongation by divergent anatomical peak shifts in the Blenniiformes, a radiation of small-bodied substrate-associated marine teleost fishes. Species in the genus Xiphasia (hairtail blennies) evolved toward a peak defined by a highly elongated caudal vertebral region but ancestral cranial and precaudal vertebral morphology. In contrast, a clade that includes the genera Chaenopsis and Lucayablennius (pike and arrow blennies) evolved toward a peak with a long slender skull but ancestral axial skeletal anatomy. Neither set of anatomical peak shifts aligns closely with the major axis of anatomical diversification in other blenniiform fishes. These results provide little evidence that ancestral constraints have affected body shape transformation, and instead suggest that extreme elongation arose with distinct shifts in selective factors and development.© 2021 The Authors. Evolution © 2021 The Society for the Study of Evolution.CollarDavid CDC0000-0003-2631-6743Department of Organismal and Environmental Biology, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, 23606.DiPaoloEmma C CECCDepartment of Organismal and Environmental Biology, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, 23606.MaiSienna LSLDepartment of Organismal and Environmental Biology, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, 23606.MehtaRita SRSDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, 95060.engDryad10.5061/dryad.jwstqjq6mJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20210516United StatesEvolution03732240014-3820IMAdaptation, BiologicalgeneticsAnimalsBiological EvolutionModels, GeneticPerciformesanatomy & histologyPhylogenySkullanatomy & histologySomatotypesAxial skeletonBlenniidaeChaenopsidaeOrnstein-Uhlenbeck processblenniesbody elongationcranial skeleton20210224202007122021040520214246020211027602021423645ppublish3389029610.1111/evo.14238LITERATURE CITED, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Patterns of Body Shape Diversity and Evolution in Intertidal and Subtidal Lineages of Combtooth Blennies (<b>Blenniidae</b>).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Egan JP, Buser TJ, Burns MD, Simons AM, Hundt PJ<br><font color=gray><i>Integrative organismal biology (Oxford, England), 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The false cleanerfish relies on aggressive mimicry to bite fish fins when benthic foods are scarce in their local habitat.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Fujisawa M, Sakai Y, Kuwamura T<br><font color=gray><i>Scientific reports, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title><i>Cirripectes matatakaro</i>, a new species of combtooth blenny from the Central Pacific, illuminates the origins of the Hawaiian fish fauna.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Hoban ML, Williams JT<br><font color=gray><i>PeerJ, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>First genetic record of the non-native muzzled blenny Omobranchus punctatus (Teleostei: <b>Blenniidae</b>) in the Atlantic Coast of Central and South America.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Cabezas MP, Lasso-Alcalá OM, Xavier R, Jowers MJ<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of fish biologyJ Fish BiolFirst genetic record of the non-native muzzled blenny Omobranchus punctatus (Teleostei: Blenniidae) in the Atlantic Coast of Central and South America.841-84610.1111/jfb.14268In this study we sequenced two mitochondrial (COI and 16S rRNA) and one nuclear (18S rRNA) gene fragment of an introduced muzzled blenny (Omobranchus punctatus) specimen collected from the Orinoco Delta (Gulf of Paria estuary) in Venezuela. This is the first genetic data generated for this species' introduced range in Central and South America, suggesting an introduction from the Indian Ocean.© 2020 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.CabezasM PilarMPhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-3026-9281Department of Biology, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.CIBIO-InBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Universidade do Porto, Rua Padre Armando Quintas nº 7, Vairão, Portugal.Lasso-AlcaláOscar MOMMuseo de Historia Natural La Salle, Fundación La Salle de Ciencias Naturales, Caracas, Venezuela.XavierRaquelRCIBIO-InBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Universidade do Porto, Rua Padre Armando Quintas nº 7, Vairão, Portugal.JowersMichael JMJCIBIO-InBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Universidade do Porto, Rua Padre Armando Quintas nº 7, Vairão, Portugal.engFinancial support came from nonprofit organizations Conservation International (USA) and Fundación La Salle de Ciencias Naturales (Venezuela) to the project Biological Assessment and Socio Economical Aspects of the Aquatic Ecosystems of the Gulf of Paria and Orinoco Delta, Venezuela under the Program AquaRAP from 2002 to 2004. M.J.J. is supported by FCT (FCT, SFRH/BPD/109148/2015) and R.X. by FCT under the Programa Operacional Potencial Humano - Quadro de Referência Estratégico Nacional funds from the European Social Fund and the Portuguese Ministério da Educação e Ciência (IF-FCT contract IF/00359/2015).Journal Article20200220EnglandJ Fish Biol02140550022-11120DNA, Mitochondrial0RNA, Ribosomal, 18SEC 1.9.3.1Electron Transport Complex IVIMAnimalsAtlantic OceanDNA, MitochondrialgeneticsElectron Transport Complex IVgeneticsIndian OceanIntroduced SpeciesPerciformesclassificationgeneticsPhylogenyRNA, Ribosomal, 18SgeneticsSouth AmericaVenezuelaCaribbeanDNA barcodingballast waterbiofoulingexotic fishintroduction pattern2019091020200127202013060202062660202013060ppublish3199522810.1111/jfb.14268REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Blenniidae&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>