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Scientific:
   Proteobacteria (purple photosynthetic bacteria and relatives) 

Synonyms:
   Proteobacteria 
   not 

Broader Terms:
   Bacteria 
   Bacteria regnum 
   Eubacteria 
   Gram negative walls 
   purple 

More Specific:
   Alpha proteobacteria 
   Alphaproteobacteria 
   Beta proteobacteria 
   Betaproteobacteria 
   Delta proteobacteria 
   Deltaproteobacteria 
   Epsilon proteobacteria 
   Epsilonproteobacteria 
   Gamma proteobacteria 
   Gammaproteobacteria 
   Missing 
   Unassigned 
   delta/epsilon subdivisions 
   environmental samples 
   purple photosynthetic bacteria relatives 
   unclassified 
 
 
Latest Articles on purple photosynthetic bacteria from uBioRSS


External Resources:



1.  Preservation Rhinoplasty: Evolution and Current State of Practice in the United States.LinkIT
Patel PN, Friedman O, Kandathil CK, Most SP
Facial plastic surgery : FPS, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Adverse effects of brimonidine eye drop in children: A case series.LinkIT
Ghaffari Z, Zakariaei Z, Ghazaeian M, Jafari R, Ezoddin N, Yousefi Nouraee H, Navaeifar MR
Journal of clinical pharmacy and therapeutics J Clin Pharm Ther Adverse effects of brimonidine eye drop in children: A case series. 10.1111/jcpt.13401 Brimonidine is increasingly used in the treatment of intraocular hypertension. We report on five paediatric patients suffering from brimonidine eye drop intoxication. The most frequent signs of the intoxication were a lowered level of consciousness and hypotonia. Other complications were apnea, bradycardia, hypotension and seizure. One of the patients needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Apnea in one of the cases was resistant to naloxone. Pupils were unremarkable in two cases. Brimonidine is potentially lethal for young infants. The absence of miosis and absence of response to naloxone is not a reason to rule out brimonidine poisoning. © 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Ghaffari Zahra Z https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7163-0489 Faculty of Medicine, Bu Ali Sina Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Zakariaei Zakaria Z https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5794-8949 Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Ghazaeian Monireh M https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7444-6732 Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Jafari Reza R https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0484-1125 Department of Ophthalmology, Bu Ali Sina Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Ezoddin Neda N https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2474-0121 Khatam al Anbia Hospital, Jask, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Bandar Abbas, Iran. Yousefi Nouraee Hosnieh H Shahid Rajaee Hospital, Tonekabon, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Navaeifar Mohammad Reza MR https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9752-5484 Pediatric Infectious Diseases Research Center, Communicable Diseases Institute, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. eng Case Reports 2021 02 24 England J Clin Pharm Ther 8704308 0269-4727 IM adrenergic alpha2-Agonists adverse effects brimonidine tartrate children critical care poisoning 2020 12 18 2020 12 22 2021 02 13 2021 2 24 20 10 2021 2 25 6 0 2021 2 25 6 0 aheadofprint 33626597 10.1111/jcpt.13401 REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>3.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Sex-specific Association of Antipsychotic-induced Weight Gain and Treatment Response for Antipsychotic-Naive First Episode Schizophrenia Patients: A Prospective 8-week Longitudinal Study.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Shi H, Guan XN, Liu DY, Zhu L, Wu ZW, Luo GZ, Wang J, Xiu MH, Zhang XY<br><font color=gray><i>Pharmacopsychiatry, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Reduces Cardiac Death in Patients with Peripheral Arteriopathy.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Bonacchi M, Howe R, Micali LR, Weigel D, Parise O, Parise G, Gelsomino S, , , , , , , , Larson EB, Stroud C, , Dy SM, Waldfogel JM, Sloan DH, Cotter V, Hannum S, Heughan JAA, Chyr L, DeGroot L, Wilson R, Zhang A, Mahabare D, Wu DS, Robinson KA, , Eriksen CU, Rotar O, Toft U, Jørgensen T<br><font color=gray><i>The Thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon, 2021</Year> <Month>Feb</Month> <Day>24</Day> </PubDate> </JournalIssue> <Title>The Thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon Thorac Cardiovasc Surg Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Reduces Cardiac Death in Patients with Peripheral Arteriopathy. 10.1055/s-0041-1724036 ?The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) may enhance early outcomes in subjects with peripheral artery disease (PAD) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). ?We employed a propensity-score (PS) method to compare early postoperative results of OPCAB and on-pump CABG patients with associated PAD. The study population consisted of 1,961 patients: 284 in the OPCAB and 1,677 in the on-pump CABG group. The inverse probability of treatment weighting was used as PS method. ?The incidence of death (1.2% [95% confidence interval, CI: -0.9 to 3.3%], p?=?0.262), stroke (2.2% [95% CI: -1.4 to 5.7%], p?=?0.235), acute kidney disease (1.5% [95% CI: -3.8 to 6.8%], p?=?0.586), limb ischemia (3.2% [95% CI: -0.6 to 7.0%], p?=?0.315), and low output syndrome (1.2% [95% CI: -0.9 to 3.3%], p?=?0.262) did not differ between the two groups. On the other hand, the rate of cardiac death (1.2% [95% CI: -0.1 to 2.3%], p?=?0.038) was significantly higher in on-pump CABG group. ?The OPCAB procedure considerably reduced the occurrence of cardiac death after coronary revascularization. This finding might suggest that the OPCAB procedure should be considered as the first option in patients with higher cardiovascular risk scores. Further research is warranted. Thieme. All rights reserved. Bonacchi Massimo M Cardiac Surgery, University Hospital Careggi, Firenze, Toscana, Italy. Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Maastricht University Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands. Howe Rosemary R Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Maastricht University Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands. Micali Linda Renata LR Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Maastricht University Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands. Weigel Daniel D Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Maastricht University Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands. Parise Orlando O Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Maastricht University Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands. Parise Gianmarco G Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Maastricht University Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), Maastricht, The Netherlands. Gelsomino Sandro S 0000-0002-7746-989X Cardiac Surgery, University Hospital Careggi, Firenze, Toscana, Italy. eng Journal Article 2021 02 24 Germany Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 7903387 0171-6425 IM No conflicts of interest to be disclosed. 2021 2 24 20 10 2021 2 25 6 0 2021 2 25 6 0 aheadofprint 33626589 10.1055/s-0041-1724036 33625814 NBK567818 10.17226/26026 National Academies Press (US) Washington (DC) Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward 2021 02 23 Committee on Care Interventions for Individuals with Dementia and Their Caregivers Board on Health Care Services Board on Health Sciences Policy Health and Medicine Division National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Larson Eric B. EB Stroud Clare C The National Academies Collection: Reports funded by National Institutes of Health 9780309154291 10.17226/26026 eng Review Millions of people are living with dementia in the United States and globally. To live well with dementia, people need care, services, and supports that reflect their values and preferences, build on their strengths and abilities, promote well-being, and address needs that evolve as cognitive impairment deepens. Persons living with dementia co-manage their care with or rely on the support of a wide range of care partners and caregivers, including spouses, other family members and friends, and direct care workers in homes or residential care settings. While dementia care has improved since the 1970s, many individuals still lack access to high-quality care and are not living as well as they might. Disadvantaged groups, especially racial and ethnic minorities, still face challenges in access to care, services, and supports, due to deep and persistent inequities. Meeting the Challenge of Caring for Persons Living with Dementia and Their Care Partners and Caregivers: A Way Forward examines the complex body of evidence on dementia care and informs decision making about which interventions are ready to be broadly disseminated and implemented. It also offers a blueprint to guide future research using rigorous, cutting-edge methods that are inclusive, equitable, and yield critical information for real-world implementation, toward the ultimate goal of better supporting persons living with dementia and their care partners and caregivers in living as well as possible. Copyright © 2021, National Academy of Sciences. HHSN263201800029I OD NIH HHS United States 2021 2 25 6 1 2021 2 25 6 1 2021 2 25 6 1 ppublish 33625814 33625813 NBK567829 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US) Rockville (MD) Integrating Palliative Care in Ambulatory Care of Noncancer Serious Chronic Illness 2021 02 Dy Sydney M. SM Waldfogel Julie M. JM Sloan Danetta H. DH Cotter Valerie V Hannum Susan S Heughan JaAlah-Ai JAA Chyr Linda L DeGroot Lyndsay L Wilson Renee R Zhang Allen A Mahabare Darshan D Wu David S. DS Robinson Karen A. KA AHRQ Comparative Effectiveness Reviews Internet Report No.: 21-EHC002 eng Review To evaluate availability, effectiveness, and implementation of interventions for integrating palliative care into ambulatory care for U.S.-based adults with serious life-threatening chronic illness or conditions other than cancer and their caregivers We evaluated interventions addressing identification of patients, patient and caregiver education, shared decision-making tools, clinician education, and models of care. We searched key U.S. national websites (March 2020) and PubMed®, CINAHL®, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (through May 2020). We also engaged Key Informants. We completed a mixed-methods review; we sought, synthesized, and integrated Web resources; quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods studies; and input from patient/caregiver and clinician/stakeholder Key Informants. Two reviewers screened websites and search results, abstracted data, assessed risk of bias or study quality, and graded strength of evidence (SOE) for key outcomes: health-related quality of life, patient overall symptom burden, patient depressive symptom scores, patient and caregiver satisfaction, and advance directive documentation. We performed meta-analyses when appropriate. We included 46 Web resources, 20 quantitative effectiveness studies, and 16 qualitative implementation studies across primary care and specialty populations. Various prediction models, tools, and triggers to identify patients are available, but none were evaluated for effectiveness or implementation. Numerous patient and caregiver education tools are available, but none were evaluated for effectiveness or implementation. All of the shared decision-making tools addressed advance care planning; these tools may increase patient satisfaction and advance directive documentation compared with usual care (SOE: low). Patients and caregivers prefer advance care planning discussions grounded in patient and caregiver experiences with individualized timing. Although numerous education and training resources for nonpalliative care clinicians are available, we were unable to draw conclusions about implementation, and none have been evaluated for effectiveness. The models evaluated for integrating palliative care were not more effective than usual care for improving health-related quality of life or patient depressive symptom scores (SOE: moderate) and may have little to no effect on increasing patient satisfaction or decreasing overall symptom burden (SOE: low), but models for integrating palliative care were effective for increasing advance directive documentation (SOE: moderate). Multimodal interventions may have little to no effect on increasing advance directive documentation (SOE: low) and other graded outcomes were not assessed. For utilization, models for integrating palliative care were not found to be more effective than usual care for decreasing hospitalizations; we were unable to draw conclusions about most other aspects of utilization or cost and resource use. We were unable to draw conclusions about caregiver satisfaction or specific characteristics of models for integrating palliative care. Patient preferences for appropriate timing of palliative care varied; costs, additional visits, and travel were seen as barriers to implementation. For integrating palliative care into ambulatory care for serious illness and conditions other than cancer, advance care planning shared decision-making tools and palliative care models were the most widely evaluated interventions and may be effective for improving only a few outcomes. More research is needed, particularly on identification of patients for these interventions; education for patients, caregivers, and clinicians; shared decision-making tools beyond advance care planning and advance directive completion; and specific components, characteristics, and implementation factors in models for integrating palliative care into ambulatory care.
Preface
Acknowledgments
Key Informants
Technical Expert Panel
Peer Reviewers
Evidence Summary
Introduction
Methods
Results
Discussion
References
Abbreviations
Appendixes
2021 2 25 6 1 2021 2 25 6 1 2021 2 25 6 1 ppublish 33625813
33625816 NBK567843 WHO Regional Office for Europe Copenhagen What is the effectiveness of systematic population-level screening programmes for reducing the burden of cardiovascular diseases? 2021

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