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Scientific:
   Carduelis chloris (Zelenushka) 
   Symphodus ocellatus (Glazchataya zelenushka) 

Synonyms:
   Carduelis chloris (European Greenfinch) 
   Labrus bergylta (ballan wrasse) 
   Labrus tinca 
   Symphodus melops (Corkwing) 
   Symphodus tinca (señorita) 

Broader Terms:
   Carduelis (goldfinches) 
   Labrus (wrasses) 
   Passeriformes (Songbirds) 
   Perciformes (perch-like fishes) 
   Symphodus 

More Specific:
   Carduelis chloris aurantiiventris 
   Carduelis chloris aurantiventris 
   Carduelis chloris bilkevitchi 
   Carduelis chloris bilkevitschi 
   Carduelis chloris chloris 
   Carduelis chloris chlorotica 
   Carduelis chloris harrisoni 
   Carduelis chloris madaraszi 
   Carduelis chloris muehlei 
   Carduelis chloris turkestanica 
   Carduelis chloris vanmarli 
   Carduelis chloris voousi 
 
 
Latest Articles on Zelenushka from uBioRSS
Verdilhão (Carduelis chloris) - Aves em Portugal Photo Pool
Carduelis chloris - Aves em Portugal Photo Pool


Symphodus melops
McMammal - BioLib

External Resources:



1.  Individual-based population genomics reveal different drivers of adaptation in sympatric fish.LinkIT
Torrado H, Carreras C, Raventos N, Macpherson E, Pascual M
Scientific reports, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and ballan wrasse Labrus bergylta display different susceptibility to clonal strains of Paramoeba perurans.LinkIT
Dahle OMV, Blindheim SH, Nylund A, Karlsbakk E, Breck O, Glosvik H, Andersen L
Diseases of aquatic organisms, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Atypical Aeromonas salmonicida vapA type V and Vibrio spp. are predominant bacteria recovered from ballan wrasse Labrus bergylta in Scotland.LinkIT
Papadopoulou A, Wallis T, Ramirez-Paredes JG, Monaghan SJ, Davie A, Migaud H, Adams A
Diseases of aquatic organisms, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Investigation of systemic isosporosis outbreaks in an aviary of greenfinch (Carduelis chloris) and goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) and a possible link with local wild sparrows (Passer domesticus).LinkIT
Gosbell MC, Olaogun OM, Luk K, Noormohammadi AH
Australian veterinary journal Aust. Vet. J. Investigation of systemic isosporosis outbreaks in an aviary of greenfinch (Carduelis chloris) and goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) and a possible link with local wild sparrows (Passer domesticus). 338-344 10.1111/avj.12947 An outbreak of systemic isosporosis caused mortalities in greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) and goldfinches (Carduelis carduelis) kept in an aviary in the western suburbs of Melbourne. The following year, a further outbreak in the same aviary occurred in a different flock of goldfinches. At the time of the second outbreak, dead and sick common sparrows (Passer domesticus) discovered near the aviary were also found to have systemic isosporosis. The systemic isosporosis was investigated and described using histopathology, electron microscopy and sequence analysis of the 18s gene. Isospora spp. infecting the greenfinch and the goldfinch caused significant thickening of the duodenal lamina propria. Measurements in the goldfinches showed an inverse correlation coefficient between the thickening of the duodenum and the weightof the birds. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Isospora spp. within lymphocytes migrating into the lamina propria of the duodenum. Analysis of the 18s sequence discovered two different gene sequences across the three species of birds that didn't completely match any sequences previously deposited in GenBank. Although the sparrows were found to have died from causes other than systemic Isospora, molecular studies of samples from their liver revealed the presence of an Isospora with 18s gene sequence identical to that found in the captive greenfinches. © 2020 Australian Veterinary Association. Gosbell M C MC https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0977-9132 Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia. Melbourne Bird Veterinary Clinic, Scoresby, Victoria, 3179, Australia. Olaogun O M OM Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia. Luk Khy K Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia. Noormohammadi A H AH Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia. eng Asia Pacific Centre for Animal Health Association of Avian Veterinarians Australasan Committee (AAVAC) University of Sydney Melbourne University Association of Avian Veterinarians Case Reports Journal Article 2020 05 20 England Aust Vet J 0370616 0005-0423 IM Animals Bird Diseases epidemiology Disease Outbreaks Isospora Sparrows Isospora atoxoplasmosis coccidiosis finches systemic coccidiosis systemic isosporosis 2019 11 09 2020 03 17 2020 03 25 2020 5 21 6 0 2020 7 16 6 0 2020 5 21 6 0 ppublish 32430906 10.1111/avj.12947 References, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>"A cleaner break": Genetic divergence between geographic groups and sympatric phenotypes revealed in ballan wrasse (<i>Labrus bergylta</i>).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Seljestad GW, Quintela M, Faust E, Halvorsen KT, Besnier F, Jansson E, Dahle G, Knutsen H, André C, Folkvord A, Glover KA<br><font color=gray><i>Ecology and evolution, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Skeletal deformities in wild and farmed cleaner fish species used in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar aquaculture.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Fjelldal PG, Madaro A, Hvas M, Stien LH, Oppedal F, Fraser TW<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of fish biology J. Fish Biol. Skeletal deformities in wild and farmed cleaner fish species used in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar aquaculture. 10.1111/jfb.14337 As a first attempt to assess bone health in cleaner fish production, wild and cultured ballan wrasse Labrus bergylta and lumpfish Cyclopterus lumpus were examined by radiology. In C. lumpus, wild fish (57%) had more vertebra deformities (?1 deformed vertebrae) than cultured fish (2-16%). One wild C. lumpus had lordosis and another was missing the tail fin. In L. bergylta, wild fish (11%) had fewer vertebra deformities than cultured individuals (78-91%). Among the cultured L. bergylta, 17-53% of the fish had severe vertebra deformities (?6 deformed vertebrae) with two predominate sites of location, one between vertebra 4 and 10 (S1) in the trunk, and one between 19 and 26 (S2) in the tail. Fusions dominated S1, while compressions dominated S2. Although wild L. bergylta had a low vertebra deformity level, 83% had calluses and 14% had fractures in haemal/neural spines and/or ribs. The site-specific appearance and pathology of fracture and callus in wild L. bergylta suggests these are induced by chronic mechanical stress, and a possible pathogenesis for fish hyperostosis is presented based on this notion. In conclusion, good bone health was documented in cultured C. lumpus, but cultured L. bergylta suffered poor bone health. How this affects survival, growth, swimming abilities and welfare in cultured wrasse should be further investigated. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Skeletal deformities were studied in ballan wrasse and lumpfish of both wild and cultured origin for the first time to identify potential welfare issues when deploying them as cleaner fish in salmon sea cages. While cultured lumpfish showed good bone health, cultured wrasse had a high occurrence of vertebra deformities, which is expected to impact lice eating efficiency and animal welfare negatively. These deformities are most likely induced early in development. © 2020 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Fjelldal Per Gunnar PG https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9237-2706 Matre Research Station, Institute of Marine Research, Matredal, Norway. Madaro Angelico A Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway. Hvas Malthe M Matre Research Station, Institute of Marine Research, Matredal, Norway. Stien Lars Helge LH Matre Research Station, Institute of Marine Research, Matredal, Norway. Oppedal Frode F Matre Research Station, Institute of Marine Research, Matredal, Norway. Fraser Thomas Wk TW Matre Research Station, Institute of Marine Research, Matredal, Norway. eng This study was funded by the Institute of Marine Research (internal project 'OvervÃ¥king velferd', no. 14930, project leader Lars Helge Stien). Journal Article 2020 04 03 England J Fish Biol 0214055 0022-1112 IM Ballan wrasse Labrus bergylta fish welfare lumpfish Cylopterus lumpus osteomas salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis vertebral column 2019 07 29 2020 03 09 2020 03 31 2020 4 4 6 0 2020 4 4 6 0 2020 4 4 6 0 aheadofprint 32243571 10.1111/jfb.14337 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Comments on "The marine teleost fishes of the Sea of Marmara; an updated and annotated checklist" by Artüz amp; Fricke (2019).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Bilecenoglu M<br><font color=gray><i>Zootaxa, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Proposed Indoor Test Procedure to Quantify Pesticide Treatment Effects on Seed Consumption by Birds.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Esther A, von Blanckenhagen F, der Heiden AA, Dürger J, Kozyczkowska-Kneffel D, Ludwigs JD, Sadowski J, Shadid M, Gabriel D<br><font color=gray><i>Environmental toxicology and chemistry Environ. Toxicol. Chem. Proposed Indoor Test Procedure to Quantify Pesticide Treatment Effects on Seed Consumption by Birds. 359-370 10.1002/etc.4620 Pesticides used in seed coatings can influence seed consumption by birds and, therefore, actual exposure risk for them. A quantification of such effects on consumption is currently not regarded as a refinement factor in environmental risk assessments, although it is a possible option and should be considered, for example, for comparing exposure risk of different pesticides. It can highlight avoidance behavior, preventing birds from taking up lethal or sublethal pesticide doses. To formulate a standard, we developed an indoor test procedure based on established pen test methods, including 2- and no-choice phases with hunger periods. During testing, the highest standards of animal welfare were applied. Statistical approaches were used to determine the most appropriate number of replicates and for analysis. The effect on consumption of seeds is expressed as the ratio of consumed treated to untreated seeds. This consumption factor can be applied in avian risk assessments for seed treatments equivalent to an avoidance factor. We present, as an example, an application of the procedure to obtain a seed- and species-specific consumption factor for oilseed rape seeds (Brassica napus) provided untreated and treated with fungicides to greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) and Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). Overall, bird constitution was not negatively affected by the test procedure in either species. The test procedure was suitable for showing differences in expected consumption patterns, such as greater avoidance of treated seeds in 2-choice than in no-choice tests. However, the consumption differed between species and fungicide treatments, allowing us to rank avoidance effects of different fungicides. Using the presented standard procedure to generate comparable pesticide- and species-specific consumption factors for more species and seed treatments may result in refinement of default values and reduce animal trials in different designs in the future. Environ Toxicol Chem 2020;39:359-370. © 2019 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. © 2019 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. Esther Alexandra A Julius Kuehn Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Horticulture and Forests, Vertebrate Research, Münster, Germany. von Blanckenhagen Felix F RIFCON GmbH, Hirschberg, Germany. der Heiden Angela An AA Julius Kuehn Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Horticulture and Forests, Vertebrate Research, Münster, Germany. Dürger Joanna J Julius Kuehn Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Horticulture and Forests, Vertebrate Research, Münster, Germany. Kozyczkowska-Kneffel Dominika D Julius Kuehn Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Horticulture and Forests, Vertebrate Research, Münster, Germany. Ludwigs Jan-Dieter JD 0000-0003-3903-2109 RIFCON GmbH, Hirschberg, Germany. Sadowski Jan J Julius Kuehn Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Horticulture and Forests, Vertebrate Research, Münster, Germany. Shadid Maisam M Julius Kuehn Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Horticulture and Forests, Vertebrate Research, Münster, Germany. Gabriel Doreen D Julius Kuehn Institute, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Crop and Soil Science, Braunschweig, Germany. eng Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2019 12 27 United States Environ Toxicol Chem 8308958 0730-7268 0 Pesticides IM Animal Feed standards Animals Avoidance Learning Brassica napus chemistry Coturnix physiology Feeding Behavior drug effects Finches physiology Pesticides analysis toxicity Risk Assessment Seeds chemistry Species Specificity Avoidance Consumption comparison Consumption factor Granivor Plant protection products 2019 03 05 2019 04 01 2019 10 15 2019 10 22 6 0 2020 8 18 6 0 2019 10 22 6 0 ppublish 31634978 10.1002/etc.4620 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Corticosterone levels correlate in wild-grown and lab-grown feathers in greenfinches (Carduelis chloris) and predict behaviour and survival in captivity.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Lind MA, Hõrak P, Sepp T, Meitern R<br><font color=gray><i>Hormones and behavior, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Demographic history has shaped the strongly differentiated corkwing wrasse populations in Northern Europe.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Mattingsdal M, Jorde PE, Knutsen H, Jentoft S, Stenseth NC, Sodeland M, Robalo JI, Hansen MM, André C, Blanco Gonzalez E<br><font color=gray><i>Molecular ecology Mol. Ecol. Demographic history has shaped the strongly differentiated corkwing wrasse populations in Northern Europe. 160-171 10.1111/mec.15310 Understanding the biological processes involved in genetic differentiation and divergence between populations within species is a pivotal aim in evolutionary biology. One particular phenomenon that requires clarification is the maintenance of genetic barriers despite the high potential for gene flow in the marine environment. Such patterns have been attributed to limited dispersal or local adaptation, and to a lesser extent to the demographic history of the species. The corkwing wrasse (Symphodus melops) is an example of a marine fish species where regions of particular strong divergence are observed. One such genetic break occurred at a surprisingly small spatial scale (FST ~0.1), over a short coastline (<60 km) in the North Sea-Skagerrak transition area in southwestern Norway. Here, we investigate the observed divergence and purported reproductive isolation using genome resequencing. Our results suggest that historical events during the post-glacial recolonization route can explain the present population structure of the corkwing wrasse in the northeast Atlantic. While the divergence across the break is strong, we detected ongoing gene flow between populations over the break suggesting recent contact or negative selection against hybrids. Moreover, we found few outlier loci and no clear genomic regions potentially being under selection. We concluded that neutral processes and random genetic drift e.g., due to founder events during colonization have shaped the population structure in this species in Northern Europe. Our findings underline the need to take into account the demographic process in studies of divergence processes. © 2019 The Authors. Molecular Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Mattingsdal Morten M 0000-0003-4440-0324 Department of Natural Sciences, Centre for Coastal Research, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway. Jorde Per Erik PE 0000-0001-5515-7257 Institute of Marine Research, Flødevigen, Norway. Knutsen Halvor H Department of Natural Sciences, Centre for Coastal Research, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway. Institute of Marine Research, Flødevigen, Norway. Jentoft Sissel S 0000-0001-8707-531X Department of Biosciences, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Stenseth Nils Christian NC Department of Natural Sciences, Centre for Coastal Research, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway. Department of Biosciences, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Sodeland Marte M Department of Natural Sciences, Centre for Coastal Research, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway. Robalo Joana I JI Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ISPA Instituto Universitário de Ciências Psicológicas, Sociais e da Vida, Lisboa, Portugal. Hansen Michael M MM 0000-0001-5372-4828 Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark. André Carl C Department of Marine Sciences-Tjärnö, Göteborg University, Strömstad, Sweden. Blanco Gonzalez Enrique E 0000-0002-2631-2331 Department of Natural Sciences, Centre for Coastal Research, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway. Norwegian College of Fishery Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. eng Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2019 12 04 England Mol Ecol 9214478 0962-1083 IM aquaculture fish landscape genetics phylogeography population genetics-empirical 2019 04 01 2019 11 06 2019 11 13 2019 11 17 6 0 2019 11 17 6 0 2019 11 17 6 0 ppublish 31733084 10.1111/mec.15310 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Zelenushka&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>