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   Varecia (Ruffed Lemurs) 
 
 
Latest Articles on Varecia rubra from uBioRSS
Urethral obstruction with a copulatory plug following natural breeding in a... - Latest Issue of Journal of Medical Primatology
Study: Conservation Areas Not Protecting Unique Endangered Species - LiveScience.com




1.  Enriched sleep environments lengthen lemur sleep duration.LinkIT
Vining AQ, Nunn CL, Samson DR
PloS one, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  OUTCOMES OF TRANSPLACENTAL TRANSMISSION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM CHRONICALLY INFECTED FEMALE RED RUFFED LEMURS (VARECIA RUBRA).LinkIT
Browning GR, Singleton C, Gibson D, Stalis IH
Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  A comparison of intestinal parasite infections and activity budgets in three free-ranging vs. enclosure-housed lemur species (Lemur catta, Varecia rubra, and Eulemur mongoz).LinkIT
Achorn A, Winking J
Journal of medical primatologyJ Med PrimatolA comparison of intestinal parasite infections and activity budgets in three free-ranging vs. enclosure-housed lemur species (Lemur catta, Varecia rubra, and Eulemur mongoz).189-19210.1111/jmp.12523This study examines how range size affects intestinal parasite infections, and how such infections affect activity budgets in captive lemurs. There were no differences in parasite richness or intensity attributable to habitat type. However, there was a strong suggestion that parasite loads reduce activity levels.© 2021 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.AchornAngelaA0000-0002-3425-2551Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.WinkingJeffreyJDepartment of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.engJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20210415DenmarkJ Med Primatol03206260047-2565Eulemur mongozIMAnimalsLemurLemuridaeParasitic Diseasescaptivehelminthsprimates20210318202004232021032920214176020211029602021416652ppublish3386053910.1111/jmp.12523REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Effects of scent enrichment on behavioral and physiological indicators of stress in zoo primates.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Vaglio S, Kaburu SSK, Pearce R, Bryant L, McAuley A, Lott A, Sheppard DJ, Smith S, E Tompkins B, J Elwell E, Fontani S, H Young C, Marliani G, Accorsi PA<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of primatologyAm J PrimatolEffects of scent enrichment on behavioral and physiological indicators of stress in zoo primates.e2324710.1002/ajp.23247Captive breeding is vital for primate conservation, with modern zoos serving a crucial role in breeding populations of threatened species and educating the general public. However, captive populations can experience welfare issues that may also undermine their reproductive success. To enhance the wellbeing of endangered zoo primates, we conducted a study to assess the effects of a new scent enrichment program on captive red-ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra), black howler monkeys (Alouatta caraya), siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus), lar gibbons (Hylobates lar) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus). We combined behavioral observations and fecal endocrinology analyses to evaluate the effects of a series of essential oils (benzoin, lavender, lemongrass) on five captive troops (N?=?19) housed at Dudley Zoo & Castle and Twycross Zoo (UK). We recorded observations of natural species-specific and abnormal stress-related behaviors for 480?h using instantaneous scan sampling. We collected 189 fecal samples and measured the fecal cortisol concentrations using radioimmunoassay. We found a significant effect of the scent enrichment on behaviors, with red-ruffed lemurs and black howler monkeys reducing their social interactions, as well as red-ruffed lemurs and lar gibbons decreasing their stress-related behaviors after they were exposed to the series of essential oils. We also found that red-ruffed lemurs displayed a significant increase in fecal glucocorticoids following exposure to essential oils. Our contradictory findings suggest that the effects of this series of essential oils may change depending on the species-specific social lives and olfactory repertoires of primates. In conclusion, we cannot recommend using these essential oils widely with zoo primates without additional evaluation.© 2021 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology Published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.VaglioStefanoS0000-0003-0885-8573Department of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.Department of Anthropology, Behaviour & Ecology and Evolution Research (BEER) Centre, Durham University, Durham, UK.KaburuStefano S KSSK0000-0001-7456-3269Department of Biomedical Science & Physiology, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.PearceRichardRDepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.BryantLukeLDepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.McAuleyAilieADepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.LottAlexandriaADepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.SheppardDemi JDJDepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.SmithSarahSDepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.E TompkinsBethBDepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.J ElwellEmilyEDepartment of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.FontaniSaraS0000-0002-9338-8555Department of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.H YoungChristopherC0000-0001-6090-7315Department of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.MarlianiGiovannaGDipartimento di Scienze Mediche Veterinarie, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.AccorsiPier AttilioPA0000-0001-8614-7131Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche Veterinarie, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.engJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20210304United StatesAm J Primatol81089490275-2565IMAnimalsAnimals, ZooLemuridaeOdorantsPrimatesSmellessential oilsfecal cortisolsocial interactionsstereotypic behaviors202102122020111420210213202135602021112560202134841ppublish3366088510.1002/ajp.23247REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Daily lettuce supplements promote foraging behavior and modify the gut microbiota in captive frugivores.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Greene LK, Clarke TA, Southworth CA, Bornbusch SL, Ehmke EE<br><font color=gray><i>Zoo biologyZoo BiolDaily lettuce supplements promote foraging behavior and modify the gut microbiota in captive frugivores.334-34410.1002/zoo.21555For captive primates, greater provisioning of leafy greens or foliage can promote natural foraging behavior while boosting fiber intake. Recalcitrant fiber, although minimally available to endogenous metabolism, is readily fermented into nutrients by gut microbes. Whereas most primates in captivity consume fiber-limited diets and harbor imbalanced gut microbiota compared to their wild conspecifics, the importance of fiber provisioning to primate gut microbiota has predominately been studied in folivores. We, therefore, determined if commercial lettuce could be used to encourage foraging behavior and modify the gut microbiota of captive frugivores. We provisioned ruffed lemurs (Varecia rubra and V. variegata) with romaine lettuce, on top of the standard dietary fare, for 10 consecutive days. Before and across the period of lettuce supplementation, we collected observational data of animal feeding and fecal samples for microbiome analysis, determined via amplicon sequencing. The ruffed lemurs and their gut microbes responded to lettuce provisioning. In particular, younger animals readily ate lettuce and showed no decline in consumption across study days. When controlling for the effects of host species and social-group membership, lettuce consumption shifted the composition of the gut microbiome away from each lemur's own baseline, an effect that became stronger as the study progressed. In the final study days, Ruminococcaceae UCG-008 and Akkermansia, microbes typically and respectively associated with fiber metabolism and host health, were significantly enriched in the consortia of lettuce-provisioned subjects. Ultimately, the routine offering of lettuce, leafy greens, or foliage to captive frugivores may benefit animal wellbeing.© 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC.GreeneLydia KLKhttp://orcid.org/0000-0002-7693-8826University Program in Ecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.Research Department, Duke Lemur Center, Durham, North Carolina.ClarkeTara ATADepartment of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.Department of Sociology and Anthropology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina.SouthworthChelsea ACAhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-4713-4279Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.BornbuschSally LSLhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-9996-8369Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.EhmkeErin EEEResearch Department, Duke Lemur Center, Durham, North Carolina.eng1749465National Science Foundation BCSDuke Lemur Center Director's FundJournal ArticleObservational Study20200701United StatesZoo Biol88078370733-3188Varecia variegataIMAnimal FeedAnimal WelfareAnimalsAnimals, ZooDietveterinaryFeeding BehaviorFruitGastrointestinal MicrobiomeLemuridaephysiologyLettuceVareciafibergut microbiomehusbandrylemur2019102420200508202006152020726020212246020207260ppublish3260853410.1002/zoo.21555REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>CLONAL SPREAD OF <i>YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA</i> 1B/O:8 IN MULTIPLE ZOO SPECIES.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Hicks CL, Napier JE, Armstrong DL, Gladney LM, Tarr CL, Freeman MM, Iwen PC<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Eulerian videography technology improves classification of sleep architecture in primates.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Melvin E, Samson D, Nunn CL<br><font color=gray><i>Primates; journal of primatology, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Infant nest and stash sites of variegated lemurs (<b>Varecia rubra</b>): The extended phenotype.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Vasey N, Mogilewsky M, Schatz GE<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of primatology, 2018</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Behavioral responses of three lemur species to different food enrichment devices.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Shapiro ME, Shapiro HG, Ehmke EE<br><font color=gray><i>Zoo biology, 2018</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>High reproductive effort is associated with decreasing mortality late in life in captive ruffed lemurs.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Tidière M, Lemaître JF, Douay G, Whipple M, Gaillard JM<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of primatology, 2017</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Varecia+rubra&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; 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