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Scientific:
   Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Thambalaya) 

Synonyms:
   Lutianus argentimaculatus 
   Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Yellow snapper) 
   Lutjanus argentimculatus 
   Sciaena argentimaculata 

Broader Terms:
   Lutianus 
   Lutjanus (snappers) 
   Perciformes (perch-likes) 
   Sciaena (black drums) 
 
 
Latest Articles on Thambalaya from uBioRSS


External Resources:



1.  Dietary intake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from coral reef fish in the Persian Gulf - Human health risk assessment.LinkIT
Ranjbar Jafarabadi A, Mashjoor S, Riyahi Bakhtiari A, Jadot C
Food chemistry, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  A high proportion of red snapper sold in North Carolina is mislabeled.LinkIT
Spencer ET, Richards E, Steinwand B, Clemons J, Dahringer J, Desai P, Fisher M, Fussell S, Gorman O, Jones D, Le A, Long K, McMahan C, Moscarito C, Pelay C, Price E, Smith A, VanSant A, Bruno JF
PeerJ, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Effects of di-n-butyl phthalate on gills- and liver-specific EROD activities and CYP1A levels in juvenile red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).LinkIT
Chen H, Zhang Z, Zhang L, Tian F, Tang Z, Cai W, Jia X
Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Toxicology & pharmacology : CBP, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Changes in Shrimping Effort in the Gulf of Mexico and the Impacts to Red Snapper.LinkIT
Gallaway BJ, Raborn SW, Picariello L, Putman NF
iScience, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Population dynamics of threadfin porgy Evynnis cardinalis, an endangered species on the IUCN red list in the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea.LinkIT
Zhang K, Cai Y, Liao B, Jiang Y, Sun M, Su L, Chen Z
Journal of fish biology J. Fish Biol. Population dynamics of threadfin porgy Evynnis cardinalis, an endangered species on the IUCN red list in the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea. 10.1111/jfb.14398 Threadfin porgy Evynnis cardinalis is both a dominant fish species and an important fishing target in bottom trawl fisheries in the Beibu Gulf, South China Sea. It was listed as endangered (EN) in a recent International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) red list. Despite its economic importance and endangered status, limited research on its biological characteristics and spatial-temporal distribution has been undertaken this last decade, creating uncertainty in current conservation and management. We analyse this species' spatial distribution characteristics using data from four seasonal bottom trawl surveys in 2014-2015, and report average catch per unit effort to vary seasonally, from 49.1 to 594.5?ind?h-1 . Growth, mortality and sexual maturity are reported for four time periods based on data from bottom trawl fishery surveys over 1961-1962, 1998-1999, 2006, and 2014-2015. Length frequency distributions changed from bimodal to unimodal, and the female-to-male ratio increased. Mean body length and length at first maturity decreased, whereas the growth coefficient increased, indicating miniaturization, early sexual maturity and accelerated growth, respectively. We report sparid catch to have first exceeded maximum sustainable yield in 2001, and to have remained overfished from 2010 to 2015. Since the 1980s, low-trophic-level fishes such as E. cardinalis have replaced high-trophic-level fishes such as Crimson snapper Lutjanus erythropterus to become dominant species. As catches have increased substantially, these species have been faced with overfishing, driving the ecosystem into an unstable state. © 2020 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Zhang Kui K South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Key Laboratory of Open-Sea Fishery Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Guangzhou, China. Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory, Guangzhou, China. Cai Yancong Y South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Key Laboratory of Open-Sea Fishery Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Guangzhou, China. Liao Baochao B Department of Mathematics, Shandong University, Weihai, China. Jiang Yan'e Y South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Key Laboratory of Open-Sea Fishery Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Guangzhou, China. Sun Mingshuai M South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Key Laboratory of Open-Sea Fishery Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Guangzhou, China. Su Li L South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Key Laboratory of Open-Sea Fishery Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Guangzhou, China. Chen Zuozhi Z https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4045-1212 South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou, China. Key Laboratory of Open-Sea Fishery Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Guangzhou, China. Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory, Guangzhou, China. eng This study was funded by the National Key R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2018YFD0900906), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 31602157), Key Special Project for Introduced Talents Team of Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Guangzhou, Grant No. GML2019ZD0605), and Central Public-interest Scientific Institution Basal Research Fund of the South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute (Grant No. 2015TS22). Journal Article 2020 05 17 England J Fish Biol 0214055 0022-1112 IM Evynnis cardinalis biological characteristics length at first maturity miniaturization spatial distribution 2020 01 21 2020 03 18 2020 05 15 2020 5 19 6 0 2020 5 19 6 0 2020 5 19 6 0 aheadofprint 32419217 10.1111/jfb.14398 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Development and characterization of genomic resources for a non-model marine teleost, the red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus, Lutjanidae): Construction of a high-density linkage map, anchoring of genome contigs and comparative genomic analysis.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Norrell AE, Jones KL, Saillant EA<br><font color=gray><i>PloS one, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Training fish for restocking: refuge and predator training in the hatchery has limited benefits for a marine fish.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Rae DL, Mos B, Scott A, Dworjanyn SA<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of fish biology J. Fish Biol. Training fish for restocking: refuge and predator training in the hatchery has limited benefits for a marine fish. 10.1111/jfb.14345 Large numbers of hatchery-reared fish are released in stocking programmes; however, success is limited by high mortality. Predation is seen as the main cause of deaths but might be reduced by training fish before release to avoid predators and/or use refuge. In this study on a potential restocking species, yellowfin bream Acanthopagrus australis, the effects of predator training and refuge on the behaviour of fish in the hatchery were tested. In the first experiment, juvenile bream were exposed to predatory mangrove jack (Lutjanus argentimaculatus) fed exclusively on bream flesh while housed in tanks with and without refuge. Predator training altered fish behaviour when fish were re-exposed to predators, but the effects were subtle and varied between groups of fish. In contrast, refuge created strong and consistent changes in behaviour, significantly slowing down the amount of time that fish took to consume food. A second experiment focused on the effects of refuge. Bream were trained to use artificial seagrass or house bricks as refuge and then exposed to mangrove jacks in a laboratory predation experiment. When refuge was available, fish significantly slowed down their feeding rate. There was a small, transient increase in survival for fish given seagrass refuges, but this was irrespective of whether the bream were trained to use refuge. The results of this study indicate that the use of refuge may be innate and the benefits of refuge may be available to naive hatchery-reared fish or fish trained to use refuge shortly before release. This suggests that there is potential to improve post-release survival of fingerlings without time-consuming and expensive hatchery training. © 2020 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. Rae David L DL National Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. Mos Benjamin B https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3687-516X National Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. Scott Anna A https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6894-8808 National Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. Dworjanyn Symon A SA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6690-8033 National Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia. eng NSW Recreational Fishing Trust Journal Article 2020 04 11 England J Fish Biol 0214055 0022-1112 IM cues, hatchery, predator, prey, refuge, survival 2019 12 21 2020 03 06 2020 04 08 2020 4 12 6 0 2020 4 12 6 0 2020 4 12 6 0 aheadofprint 32278329 10.1111/jfb.14345 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Deep Insights into Gut Microbiota in Four Carnivorous Coral Reef Fishes from the South China Sea.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Gao YM, Zou KS, Zhou L, Huang XD, Li YY, Gao XY, Chen X, Zhang XY<br><font color=gray><i>Microorganisms, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>The fishes from the Coto River basin, Pacific coast, Costa Rica.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Angulo A, Gil-León JS, Oviedo-Soto A, Abarca-Odio JI, Umaña-Villalobos G<br><font color=gray><i>Zootaxa, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Occurrence of Caligus asperimanus Pearse, 1951 (Copepoda: Caligidae) parasitic Lutjanus spp. (Perciformes: Lutjanidae) in the western South Atlantic.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Oliveira BL, Fernandes LFL, Rocha GM, Malanski ACGS, Paschoal F<br><font color=gray><i>Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology : Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia Veterinaria, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a 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href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Thambalaya&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>