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Synonyms:
   Solanum juninense 

Broader Terms:
   Solanum (forest nightshade) 
 
 


External Resources:



1.  Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector RipJ triggers bacterial wilt resistance in Solanum pimpinellifolium.LinkIT
Pandey A, Moon H, Choi S, Yoon H, Prokchorchik M, Jayaraman J, Sujeevan R, Kang YM, McCann H, Segonzac C, Kim CM, Park SJ, Sohn K
Molecular plant-microbe interactions : MPMI, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Allelic variants of the NLR protein Rpi-chc1 differentially recognise members of the Phytophthora infestans PexRD12/31 effector superfamily through the leucine-rich repeat domain.LinkIT
Monino-Lopez D, Nijenhuis M, Kodde L, Kamoun S, Salehian H, Schentsnyi K, Stam R, Lokossou A, Abd-El-Haliem A, Visser RG, Vossen JH
The Plant journal : for cell and molecular biology, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Chemotaxonomic profiling of fungal endophytes of Solanum mauritianum (alien weed) using gas chromatography high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HRTOF-MS).LinkIT
Pelo SP, Adebo OA, Green E
Metabolomics : Official journal of the Metabolomic Society, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Integration of mRNA and miRNA analysis reveals the molecular mechanism of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) response to alkali stress.LinkIT
Kang Y, Yang X, Liu Y, Shi M, Zhang W, Fan Y, Yao Y, Zhang J, Qin S
International journal of biological macromolecules, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Quantifying the Power and Precision of QTL Analysis in Autopolyploids Under Bivalent and Multivalent Genetic Models.LinkIT
Bourke PM, Hackett CA, Voorrips RE, Visser RGF, Maliepaard C
G3 (Bethesda, Md.), 2019
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

6.  Corrigendum.LinkIT
The New phytologist New Phytol Corrigendum. 284 10.1111/nph.12463 eng Published Erratum 2013 08 23 England New Phytol 9882884 0028-646X IM New Phytol. 2013 Mar;197(4):1214-1224 23278405 NAC transcription factor plant disease resistance tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) transcriptional and post-translational regulation ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS)-mediated degradation 2021 4 20 1 5 2013 10 1 0 0 2013 10 1 0 1 ppublish 33873834 10.1111/nph.12463 Reference, 2013</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Elevated CO<sub>2</sub> increases biomass and tuber yield in potato even at high ozone concentrations.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Donnelly A, Craigon J, Black CR, Colls JJ, Landon G<br><font color=gray><i>The New phytologist New Phytol Elevated CO2 increases biomass and tuber yield in potato even at high ozone concentrations. 265-274 10.1046/j.1469-8137.2001.00015.x ?? Changes in the growth and yield of field-grown potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Bintje) induced by season-long elevated CO2 and/or ozone concentrations are reported. ?? Open-top chambers and unchambered field plots were used to examine crop responses to three CO2 (ambient, 550 and 680 µmol mol-1 ) and two ozone (ambient and 65 nmol mol-1 , 8 h d-1 seasonal mean) treatments applied throughout the 105 d growing season. ?? Elevated CO2 increased both above- and below-ground biomass at intermediate and final harvests. Tuber yield at final harvest was increased by c. 40% due to an increase in mean tuber weight rather than tuber number; tuber yield did not differ significantly between the 550 and 680 µmol mol-1 CO2 treatments. Elevated ozone had no significant effect on growth or yield except for the largest size category of tubers, despite extensive visible foliar injury. Significant CO2  × ozone interactions were detected only for senescent leaf number and green leaf ratio. ?? Elevated CO2 increases biomass and tuber yield in S. tuberosum cv. Bintje even at high ozone concentrations; these findings are discussed in relation to predicted future atmospheric changes. Donnelly Alison A School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK. Craigon Jim J School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK. Black Colin R CR School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK. Colls Jeremy J JJ School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK. School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, NG7 2RD, UK. Landon Geoff G School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK. eng Journal Article England New Phytol 9882884 0028-646X IM Solanum tuberosum carbon dioxide ozone potato tuber yield 2021 4 20 1 9 2001 2 1 0 0 2001 2 1 0 1 ppublish 33874630 10.1046/j.1469-8137.2001.00015.x References, 2001</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>O<sub>3</sub> -induced degradation of Rubisco protein and loss of Rubisco mRNA in relation to leaf age in Solanum tuberosum L.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Eckardt NA, Pell EJ<br><font color=gray><i>The New phytologist New Phytol O3 -induced degradation of Rubisco protein and loss of Rubisco mRNA in relation to leaf age in Solanum tuberosum L. 741-748 10.1111/j.1469-8137.1994.tb02978.x The effect of ozone (O3 ) on Rubisco degradation was investigated by dark incubation of potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Norland) following exposure to charcoal-filtered air or 0.30?l l-1 O3 for 6 h. Rubisco small subunit (rbcS) mRNA levels declined dramatically in control foliage within 10.16 h of dark incubation; thus declines in Rubisco protein following a 48-h dark period were ascribed to proteolytic degradation. Foliage sampled from the 4th and 6th leaves from the apex, designated immature and mature, respectively, showed no effect of O3 on Rubisco protein content immediately following the exposure. However, the decline in Rubisco quantity during the dark incubation was significantly enhanced by prior treatment with O3 in the mature leaves. The immature leaves sustained a similar decline in Rubisco quantity in both O2 and control treatments. O3 had a significant effect on the relative quantity of rbcS mRNA in the immature leaves (sampled immediately following the O3 exposure). Levels of rbcS mRNA in mature leaves and Rubisco large subunit (rbcL) mRNA in both leaf ages were not significantly affected by O3 , There was no effect of O3 , on Rubisco quantity in immature or mature leave's of plants maintained in the greenhouse under a 16 h photoperiod far 48 h following the exposure. Thus the effect of short-term O3 exposure on processes affecting Rubisco synthesis and degradation may have been transient, and a more prolonged exposure would he necessary to effect a decline in Rubisco protein quantity in plants grown under a 16 h photoperiod. We concluded that O3 caused enhanced degradation of Rubisco in mature leaves of plants induced to senesce by dark incubation following O3 exposures. The potential for O3 -induced reduction in synthesis of Rubisco also exists. Eckardt N A NA Graduate Program in Plant Physiology, and Department of Plant Pathology and The Environmental Resources Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 211 Buckhout Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802, USA. Pell E J EJ Graduate Program in Plant Physiology, and Department of Plant Pathology and The Environmental Resources Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 211 Buckhout Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802, USA. eng Journal Article England New Phytol 9882884 0028-646X IM Ozone RNA Rubisco potato senescence 2021 4 20 1 7 1994 8 1 0 0 1994 8 1 0 1 ppublish 33874385 10.1111/j.1469-8137.1994.tb02978.x REFERENCES, 1994</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Cultivar responses to water stress in potato: effects of shoot and roots.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Jefferies RA<br><font color=gray><i>The New phytologist New Phytol Cultivar responses to water stress in potato: effects of shoot and roots. 491-498 10.1111/j.1469-8137.1993.tb03761.x Two experiments using self- and reciprocal grafts, examined interaction between shoot and root in determining the response of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to water stress. Single-stemmed plants of the cultivars Cara and Desiree were grown in 15m pipes containing compost. Ten days after emergence, plants were either self- or reciprocally grafted. After the grafts had established, plants were either fully irrigated or subjected to drought treatments. Canopy expansion and leaf conductance were measured at regular intervals from the time that drought treatments were imposed. The production of shoot, root and tubers, and the distribution of root down the soil column were examined at the end of the experiments. Scions had a dominant effect in determining the partitioning of dry matter between shoot, root and tubers, with those of the cultivar Cara having larger shoots and roots and less partitioned into tubers. The influence of root stock and, by inference, tuber type was less significant. In both irrigated and draughted treatments leaf conductance was determined predominantly by the scion, with scions of Desiree having significantly greater leaf conductance than those of Cara. On only six occasions did the root stock have a significant effect. On these occasions leaf conductance was greater in plants with Desiree root stocks than in those with Cara root stocks. Drought reduced both dry matter production and the proportion of dry matter partitioned into tubers, and increased the proportion of dry matter in shoots and roots. Drought also increased the root: shoot ratio indicating that root growth was maintained to a greater extent than shoot growth. Specific root length (root length: weight ratio) was increased by drought in one experiment but not in the other. Differences among grafts in response to drought were determined largely by the scion, and only to a lesser extent by root stock, with scions or root stocks of Cara showing a greater shift in partitioning in favour of tubers to shoots and roots than those of Desiree. Jefferies R A RA Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, DD2 5DA, UK. eng Journal Article England New Phytol 9882884 0028-646X IM Solanum tuberosum (potato) dry matter partitioning grafting leaf conductance water stress 2021 4 20 1 6 1993 3 1 0 0 1993 3 1 0 1 ppublish 33874115 10.1111/j.1469-8137.1993.tb03761.x REFERENCES, 1993</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>IMPROVED HYPHAL GROWTH OF TWO SPECIES OF VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN THE PRESENCE OF SUSPENSION-CULTURED PLANT CELLS.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Carr GR, Hinkley MA, LE Tacon F, Hepper CM, Jones MGK, Thomas E<br><font color=gray><i>The New phytologist New Phytol IMPROVED HYPHAL GROWTH OF TWO SPECIES OF VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI IN THE PRESENCE OF SUSPENSION-CULTURED PLANT CELLS. 417-426 10.1111/j.1469-8137.1985.tb02848.x Conditions required for the combined culture of either Glomus caledonium (Nicol. &Gerd.) Trappe &Gerdemann or Glomus mosseae (Nicol. &Gerd.) Gerdemann &Trappe with suspension-cultured plant cells have been investigated. Sucrose levels (0.05 to 0.5%, w/v) lower than those used for growth of plant cells were optimal for hyphal growth of both G. caledonium and G. mosseae. In vitro hyphal growth from chlamydospores of G. caledonium was stimulated by addition of cells of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Maris Butler), lucerne (Medicago sativa L. cv. Europ) and potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Maris Piper). The presence of wheat cells similarly stimulated hyphal growth from chlamydospores of G. mosseae. Further tests on the effect of lucerne cells on G. caledonium indicated that a volatile substance was involved in the improvement of hyphal growth. Carr G R GR Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK. Hinkley M A MA Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK. LE Tacon F F Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK. Hepper C M CM Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK. Jones M G K MGK Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK. Thomas E E Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK. eng Journal Article England New Phytol 9882884 0028-646X IM Glomus caledonium Glomus mosseae hyphal growth plant cell suspension cultures volatile growth stimulant 2021 4 20 1 7 1985 11 1 0 0 1985 11 1 0 1 ppublish 33874240 10.1111/j.1469-8137.1985.tb02848.x References, 1985</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Solanum+juninense+Bitter&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>