Pubmed    Pubmed Central
uBio Home | uBioRSS

WebSearchLiteratureMolecularImages

 uBio  Web Results 1 - 10 of about 50058

Synonyms:
   Amblyeleotris latifasciata (Metallic shrimp-goby) 

Broader Terms:
   Amblyeleotris 
   Metallic 
   Perciformes (perch-likes) 
 
 


External Resources:



1.  Heavy Hydrogen Doping into ZnO and the H/D Isotope Effect.LinkIT
Nakayama R, Maesato M, Lim G, Arita M, Kitagawa H
Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Old School Techniques with Modern Capabilities: Kinetics Determination of Dynamical Information Such as Barriers, Multiple Entrance Channel Complexes, Product States, Spin Crossings, and Size Effects in Metallic Ion-Molecule Reactions.LinkIT
Ard SG, Viggiano AA, Shuman NS
The journal of physical chemistry. A, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Area Selective Deposition of Metals from the Electrical Resistivity of the Substrate.LinkIT
Nadhom H, Boyd R, Rouf P, Lundin D, Pedersen H
The journal of physical chemistry letters, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Discovery of intrinsic two-dimensional antiferromagnets from transition-metal borides.LinkIT
Wang S, Miao N, Su K, Blatov VA, Wang J
Nanoscale, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Reversed selectivity of photocatalytic CO2 reduction over metallic Pt and Pt(II) oxide cocatalysts.LinkIT
Wang J, Li Y, Zhao J, Xiong Z, Zhang J, Zhao Y
Physical chemistry chemical physics : PCCP, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

6.  Conductive electrodes of metallic-organic compound CH3CuS nanowires for all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors.LinkIT
Wang X, Lu Y, Zhao H, Sun Y, Wang R
Nanoscale, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

7.  Metallic insignia in primary teeth: A biomarker for Autism Spectrum Disorders. 61-66 10.4103/jisppd.jisppd_485_20 Lead accumulations have been found in teeth and related to behavior deficits in children, but there is a dearth of studies in exploring the role of zinc and manganese dysregulations in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using the primary tooth as biomarker. The objectives of the study were to evaluate and compare the concentrations of zinc and manganese in the primary teeth serving as biomarker, in typically developing children and children with ASD. Twelve primary incisors indicated for extraction were collected from children between the age group 6 and 9 years, for the study. Six primary incisors were obtained from children who had been diagnosed with ASD (study group). The other six teeth were obtained from typically developing children, in the similar age group. The primary incisors obtained were analyzed for metal concentrations using the technique Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry. This study was statistically analyzed by student's t-test. It was observed that there are significant differences in metal concentrations found between tooth samples of ASD children and typically developing children. Zinc concentrations were double and manganese concentrations were three times, in teeth of ASD children group as compared to the children in the control group. Results of the current study indicate that there are considerable differences in concentrations of zinc and manganese between the two groups and support the contention that there might be an association between metal exposures of a pregnant mother and child during early years of childhood and incidence of ASD. Kaur Kanwalpreet K Department of Paediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Baba Jaswant Singh Dental College and Hospital and Research Institution, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. Suneja Bharat B Department of Paediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Baba Jaswant Singh Dental College and Hospital and Research Institution, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. Jodhka Sunaina S Department of Paediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Baba Jaswant Singh Dental College and Hospital and Research Institution, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. Kaur Jasvir J Department of Paediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Baba Jaswant Singh Dental College and Hospital and Research Institution, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. Singh Amanpreet A Department of Paediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Baba Jaswant Singh Dental College and Hospital and Research Institution, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. Singh Saini Ravinder SR Associate Professor, Prosthodontics, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. eng Journal Article India J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 8710631 0970-4388 D Autism spectrum disorder biomarker manganese metals primary teeth zinc None 2021 4 22 12 13 2021 4 23 6 0 2021 4 23 6 0 ppublish 33885389 JIndianSocPedodPrevDent_2021_39_1_61_314364 10.4103/jisppd.jisppd_485_20 33886201 NBK569694 MIT Press Cambridge (MA) Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases 2015 Nriagu Jerome O. JO Skaar Eric P. EP 9780262029193 Internet Chapter 8 Metal Homeostasis during Development, Maturation, and Aging: Impact on Infectious Diseases eng Wessels Inga I Review This chapter provides a summary of the functions of essential metallic elements in human metabolism and during infectious diseases as well as their homeostasis during development, maturation, and aging. A list of food sources as well as information on the effects of deficiency and excess is provided for each metallic element. As concentrations of metallic contaminants in the environment rise, brief characterizations of nonessential but biologically relevant metallic environmental contaminants have been added. Cases of under-, mal- and overnutrition are increasing worldwide. In combination with decreased nutritional food values, this creates a growing threat for human health, affecting societal and health systems. Potential ways of approaching this problem are suggested and discussed. © 2015 Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies.
Introduction
Essential Metallic Elements
Metallic Elements with Suggested Essentiality
Metallic Elements and Infectious Diseases
Nonessential Metallic Pollutants
Conclusion
2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 ppublish 33886201
33886199 NBK569691 MIT Press Cambridge (MA) Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases 2015 Nriagu Jerome O. JO Skaar Eric P. EP 9780262029193 Internet Chapter 17 Metals in the Environment as Risk Factors for Infectious Diseases: Gaps and Opportunities eng Ackland M. Leigh ML Bornhorst Julia J Dedoussis George V. GV Dietert Rodney R. RR Nriagu Jerome O. JO Pacyna Jozef M. JM Pettifor John M. JM Review This chapter aims to provide insights into current knowledge and gaps in our understanding of the influence that trace metals in the environment have on the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. By reducing immune function, trace metal deficiencies may substantially contribute to the global burden of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria. Improved methods and biomarkers for assessing the risks of trace metals deficiencies and toxicities are required. Human activities may be contributing to trace metal deficiency in soils and plants, which is a risk factor for infectious diseases in many countries, by exacerbating the preponderance of cereals and cash crops that reduce food diversity and micronutrient intake. Adaptive strategies are needed to reverse these trends. The microbiomes of the body are in the frontline for exposure to metals and crucial in moderating the outcome of host?parasite interactions. Anthropogenic activities have led to increased toxic metal exposure, and effects on human hosts need clarification. Metal toxicities can also impair the immune system and hence increase the susceptibility to infectious pathogens. Climate change affects metal speciation and the build-up of trace elements in the human food chain, with as yet unknown outcomes on infectious disease. Food processing and the use of metallic nanomaterials can alter human exposure to metals in ways that can influence the host?pathogen competition for metals. The effects of metals on human health may also be mediated through modification of the epigenome, conferring drug resistance on pathogenic bacteria and enhancing/reducing human tolerance to infectious parasites. The emerging metals cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, and yttrium constitute another driver of change in metal exposure and may potentially modulate the immune system with unknown consequences for human health. © 2015 Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies.
Introduction
Burden of Disease Attributable to Metals and Infections
Metal Sufficiency, Deficiency, and Toxicity within the Context of Infections
Metal Pathways and Metals in the Microbiome
Impacts of Metals in the Environment on Infectious Diseases
New Approaches to Epidemiological Studies
Conclusions
Acknowledgment
2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 ppublish 33886199
33886194 NBK569682 MIT Press Cambridge (MA) Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases 2015 Nriagu Jerome O. JO Skaar Eric P. EP 9780262029193 Internet Chapter 16 The Promise of Nanometals: Reducing Infection and Increasing Biocompatibility
LinkIT
Kaur K, Suneja B, Jodhka S, Kaur J, Singh A, Singh SR, , Nriagu JO, Skaar EP, , Wessels I, , Nriagu JO, Skaar EP, , Ackland ML, Bornhorst J, Dedoussis GV, Dietert RR, Nriagu JO, Pacyna JM, Pettifor JM, , Nriagu JO, Skaar EP, , Wang M, Liu W, Webster TJ
Journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, 2021 4 22 12 13 2021 4 23 6 0 2021 4 23 6 0 ppublish 33885389 JIndianSocPedodPrevDent_2021_39_1_61_314364 10.4103/jisppd.jisppd_485_20 33886201 NBK569694 MIT Press Cambridge (MA) Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases 2015 Nriagu Jerome O. JO Skaar Eric P. EP 9780262029193 Internet Chapter 8 Metal Homeostasis during Development, Maturation, and Aging: Impact on Infectious Diseases eng Wessels Inga I Review This chapter provides a summary of the functions of essential metallic elements in human metabolism and during infectious diseases as well as their homeostasis during development, maturation, and aging. A list of food sources as well as information on the effects of deficiency and excess is provided for each metallic element. As concentrations of metallic contaminants in the environment rise, brief characterizations of nonessential but biologically relevant metallic environmental contaminants have been added. Cases of under-, mal- and overnutrition are increasing worldwide. In combination with decreased nutritional food values, this creates a growing threat for human health, affecting societal and health systems. Potential ways of approaching this problem are suggested and discussed. © 2015 Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies.
Introduction
Essential Metallic Elements
Metallic Elements with Suggested Essentiality
Metallic Elements and Infectious Diseases
Nonessential Metallic Pollutants
Conclusion
2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 ppublish 33886201
33886199 NBK569691 MIT Press Cambridge (MA) Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases 2015 Nriagu Jerome O. JO Skaar Eric P. EP 9780262029193 Internet Chapter 17 Metals in the Environment as Risk Factors for Infectious Diseases: Gaps and Opportunities eng Ackland M. Leigh ML Bornhorst Julia J Dedoussis George V. GV Dietert Rodney R. RR Nriagu Jerome O. JO Pacyna Jozef M. JM Pettifor John M. JM Review This chapter aims to provide insights into current knowledge and gaps in our understanding of the influence that trace metals in the environment have on the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. By reducing immune function, trace metal deficiencies may substantially contribute to the global burden of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria. Improved methods and biomarkers for assessing the risks of trace metals deficiencies and toxicities are required. Human activities may be contributing to trace metal deficiency in soils and plants, which is a risk factor for infectious diseases in many countries, by exacerbating the preponderance of cereals and cash crops that reduce food diversity and micronutrient intake. Adaptive strategies are needed to reverse these trends. The microbiomes of the body are in the frontline for exposure to metals and crucial in moderating the outcome of host?parasite interactions. Anthropogenic activities have led to increased toxic metal exposure, and effects on human hosts need clarification. Metal toxicities can also impair the immune system and hence increase the susceptibility to infectious pathogens. Climate change affects metal speciation and the build-up of trace elements in the human food chain, with as yet unknown outcomes on infectious disease. Food processing and the use of metallic nanomaterials can alter human exposure to metals in ways that can influence the host?pathogen competition for metals. The effects of metals on human health may also be mediated through modification of the epigenome, conferring drug resistance on pathogenic bacteria and enhancing/reducing human tolerance to infectious parasites. The emerging metals cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, and yttrium constitute another driver of change in metal exposure and may potentially modulate the immune system with unknown consequences for human health. © 2015 Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies.
Introduction
Burden of Disease Attributable to Metals and Infections
Metal Sufficiency, Deficiency, and Toxicity within the Context of Infections
Metal Pathways and Metals in the Microbiome
Impacts of Metals in the Environment on Infectious Diseases
New Approaches to Epidemiological Studies
Conclusions
Acknowledgment
2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 2021 4 23 6 1 ppublish 33886199
33886194 NBK569682 MIT Press Cambridge (MA) Trace Metals and Infectious Diseases 2015

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0



1