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Broader Terms:
   Litoria (Australasian Treefrogs) 
 
 
Latest Articles on Litoria caerulea (White, 1790) from uBioRSS
Defects in Host Immune Function in Tree Frogs with Chronic Chytridiomycosis... - PubMed: species
Modelling skin surface areas involved in water transfer in the Palmate Newt... - NRC Research Press: Canadian Journal of Zoology


External Resources:

Common Names: White's Tree Frog, Australian green tree frog, Korallenfingerlaubfrosch, green tree frog



1.  Ultraviolet-B irradiance and cumulative dose combine to determine performance and survival.LinkIT
Lundsgaard NU, Cramp RL, Franklin CE
Journal of photochemistry and photobiology. B, Biology, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Gastrointestinal entamoebiasis in captive anurans in North America.LinkIT
Weisbrod TC, Jeon AB, Childress A, Pouder DB, Castellanos-Gell J, Stacy NI, Walden HDS, Garner MM, Yanong RPE, Ossiboff RJ
Diseases of aquatic organisms, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Design of new truncated derivatives based on direct and reverse mirror repeats of first six residues of Caerin 4 antimicrobial peptide and evaluation of their activity and cytotoxicity.LinkIT
Madanchi H, Sardari S, Shajiee H, Taherian S, Ashkar M, Johari B, Shabani AA, Sharafi S
Chemical biology & drug designChem Biol Drug DesDesign of new truncated derivatives based on direct and reverse mirror repeats of first six residues of Caerin 4 antimicrobial peptide and evaluation of their activity and cytotoxicity.801-81110.1111/cbdd.13689Caerin 4 is a family of AMPs isolated from the frog called Litoria caerulea. In silico drug designing methods and using machine learning algorithms for AMPs design can reduce their usage restrictions such as production costs and the time required for investigation of their activity and toxicity. In this study, two short peptides were designed based on direct and reverse mirror repeats of GLWQKI conserved sequence from Caerin 4 family that called dCar12 and rCar12. Also, Caerin 4.1 was synthesized without primary GLWQKI sequence and named Car7-23 . Following the synthesis of peptides, their antimicrobial properties, cytotoxicity, secondary structure, and mode of action were further evaluated. Results indicated that rCar12 had a good antibacterial activity (at an MIC of 3.9-62.5 µg/ml), while Car7-23 did not have any antimicrobial properties. Cytotoxicity of rCar12 at MICs range was <5%, which is much less than Caerin 4.1. In conclusion, rCar12 with reverse mirror repeat has different functional properties compared with dCar12. These results corroborate the fact that in two peptides with identical residues and length, the position and arrangement of amino acids are very important concerning peptide function. Moreover, GLWQKI sequence is highly crucial for the antimicrobial activity of Caerin 4 antimicrobial peptide family.© 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S.MadanchiHamidH0000-0002-6527-7321Department of Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran.Drug Design and Bioinformatics Unit, Department of Medical Biotechnology, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.SardariSoroushSDrug Design and Bioinformatics Unit, Department of Medical Biotechnology, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.ShajieeHoomanHDamghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran.TaherianSinaSDamghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran.AshkarMaryamMDamghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran.JohariBehroozBDepartment of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran.ShabaniAli AkbarAADepartment of Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran.SharafiShahramSDamghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran.engJournal Article20200419EnglandChem Biol Drug Des1012625491747-02770Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides0Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins0caerin 4IMAmino Acid SequenceAnimalsAntimicrobial Cationic PeptideschemistrypharmacologyAnuraBacillus subtilisdrug effectsComputer SimulationDrug DesignEscherichia colidrug effectsHumansMachine LearningMicrobial Sensitivity TestsPore Forming Cytotoxic ProteinschemistrypharmacologyProtein Structure, SecondaryPseudomonas aeruginosadrug effectsStaphylococcus aureusdrug effectsStructure-Activity RelationshipLitoria caeruleaantimicrobial peptidecaerinin silico drug designmachine learning algorithm2019102020200303202003142020486020216236020204860ppublish3225938510.1111/cbdd.13689REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Atypical Brucella sp in captive Australian green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea): clinical features, pathology, culture and molecular characterization.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Latheef S, Keyburn A, Broz I, Bagnara A, Bayley C, Frith S, Dobson EC<br><font color=gray><i>Australian veterinary journalAust Vet JAtypical Brucella sp in captive Australian green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea): clinical features, pathology, culture and molecular characterization.216-22110.1111/avj.12925Brucella spp. are globally important zoonotic bacteria, which have historically been considered pathogens of warm-blooded species. More recently, new strains of Brucella have been cultured from a broader range of animals including terrestrial and marine mammals and amphibians. These new isolates are classified as 'atypical' brucellae and differ from the classical stains by host tropism, phenotypic traits or phylogenetic distance. Atypical Brucella have previously been described as the cause of localised and systemic infection in frogs.This report describes the clinical features, pathology, microbiology and molecular characteristics of persistent Brucella spp. infection in two Australian green tree frogs and its isolation in an additional in-contact, clinically well frog.The two frogs that died had severe nephritis attributed to brucellosis with disseminated infection identified in one animal.© 2020 Australian Veterinary Association.LatheefSSGribbles Veterinary Pathology, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia.KeyburnAACSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Division of Livestock Industries, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia.BrozIICSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Division of Livestock Industries, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia.BagnaraAACSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Division of Livestock Industries, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia.BayleyCCGribbles Veterinary Pathology, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia.FrithSSMelbourne Zoo, Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia.DobsonE CECGribbles Veterinary Pathology, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia.engCase Reports20200309EnglandAust Vet J03706160005-04230DNA, BacterialIMAnimalsAustraliaBrucellageneticsBrucellosisveterinaryDNA, BacterialPhylogenyatypical Brucellagreen tree froghistopathologymicrobiologymolecular biology20191016202001122020011420203116020207260202031160ppublish3215301910.1111/avj.12925References, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Percutaneous absorption between frog species: Variability in skin may influence delivery of therapeutics.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Llewelyn VK, Berger L, Glass BD<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of veterinary pharmacology and therapeuticsJ Vet Pharmacol TherPercutaneous absorption between frog species: Variability in skin may influence delivery of therapeutics.91-9510.1111/jvp.12824Frogs have permeable skin, so transdermal delivery provides a practical alternative to traditional dosing routes. However, little is known about how frog skin permeability differs interspecifically, and there are different reported clinical outcomes following topical application of the same chemical in different frog species. This study collated in vitro absorption kinetic data previously reported for two frog species: the green tree frog (Litoria caerulea) and the cane toad (Rhinella marina), and used linear mixed-effects modelling to produce a model of absorption. Histology of skin samples from each species was performed to observe morphological differences that may affect absorption. Absorption kinetics differed significantly between species, with the logP of the applied chemical a better predictor of permeability than molecular weight. Application site also influenced permeability, with dorsal permeability consistently higher in cane toads. Ventral permeability was more consistent between species. Skin thickness differed between species and skin regions, and this may explain the differences in absorption kinetics. Guidelines for selecting chemicals and dosing site when treating frogs are presented. The permeability differences identified may explain the poor reproducibility reported in the treatment of disease across frog species, and reinforces the importance of considering interspecies differences when designing therapeutic treatments for frogs.© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.LlewelynVictoria KVKhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-2755-5343Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.BergerLeeLOne Health Research Group, Melbourne Veterinary School, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Australia.GlassBeverley DBDPharmacy, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.engJournal Article20191125EnglandJ Vet Pharmacol Ther79109200140-77830Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal0Antifungal Agents0Central Nervous System Stimulants3G6A5W338ECaffeine8SKN0B0MIMBenzoic AcidWK2XYI10QMIbuprofenIMAnimalsAnti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidaladministration & dosagechemistrypharmacokineticsAntifungal Agentsadministration & dosagechemistrypharmacokineticsAnuraBenzoic Acidadministration & dosagechemistrypharmacokineticsCaffeineadministration & dosagechemistrypharmacokineticsCentral Nervous System Stimulantsadministration & dosagechemistrypharmacokineticsIbuprofenadministration & dosagechemistrypharmacokineticsPermeabilitySkinSkin AbsorptionSpecies Specificityadministrationanimalsanuracutaneouspermeabilityskin absorption201908012019102220191027201911276020201021602019112760ppublish3176907510.1111/jvp.12824REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>In vitro modeling of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection of the amphibian skin.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Verbrugghe E, Van Rooij P, Favoreel H, Martel A, Pasmans F<br><font color=gray><i>PloS one, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Mechanistic basis for loss of water balance in green tree frogs infected with a fungal pathogen.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Wu NC, McKercher C, Cramp RL, Franklin CE<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Ancestral chytrid pathogen remains hypervirulent following its long coevolution with amphibian hosts.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Fu M, Waldman B<br><font color=gray><i>Proceedings. Biological sciences, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Estimating the maximum attachment performance of tree frogs on rough substrates.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Langowski JKA, Rummenie A, Pieters RPM, Kovalev A, Gorb SN, van Leeuwen JL<br><font color=gray><i>Bioinspiration & biomimetics, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>A lethal fungal pathogen directly alters tight junction proteins in the skin of a susceptible amphibian.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Gauberg J, Wu N, Cramp RL, Kelly SP, Franklin CE<br><font color=gray><i>The Journal of experimental biology, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria+caerulea+%28White%2C+1790%29&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>