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Synonyms:
   Litoria (Australasian Treefrogs) 

Broader Terms:
   Hylidae (tree frogs) 
   Litoria (Australasian Treefrogs) 
   Pelodryadinae (austro-papuan tree frogs) 

More Specific:
   Litoria (Australasian Treefrogs) 
   Litoria adelaidensis 
   Litoria alboguttata 
   Litoria albolabris 
   Litoria amboinensis 
   Litoria andiirrmalin (Cape melville treefrog) 
   Litoria angiana 
   Litoria arfakiana 
   Litoria aruensis 
   Litoria auae 
   Litoria aurea (Green and golden bell frog) 
   Litoria aurea raniformis 
   Litoria barringtonensis 
   Litoria becki 
   Litoria bibonius 
   Litoria bicolor 
   Litoria booroolongensis (Booroolong frog) 
   Litoria brevipalmata (Green-thighed frog) 
   Litoria brongersmai 
   Litoria bulmeri 
   Litoria burrowsae 
   Litoria burrowsi 
   Litoria caerula 
   Litoria caerulea (Australian green tree frog) 
   Litoria capitula 
   Litoria castanea (Yellow-spotted tree frog) 
   Litoria cavernicola (Cave-dwelling frog) 
   Litoria chloris 
   Litoria chloronota 
   Litoria citropa 
   Litoria congenita 
   Litoria conicula 
   Litoria contrastens 
   Litoria cooloolensis (Cooloola tree frog) 
   Litoria coplandi 
   Litoria corbeni 
   Litoria curvata 
   Litoria cyclorhynchus 
   Litoria dahlii 
   Litoria darlingtoni 
   Litoria daviesae 
   Litoria dentata 
   Litoria dorsalis 
   Litoria dorsivena 
   Litoria electrica 
   Litoria elkeae 
   Litoria eucnemis 
   Litoria everetti (Everett's treefrog) 
   Litoria ewingi 
   Litoria ewingii 
   Litoria exophthalmia 
   Litoria fallax (Eastern Dwarf Treefrog) 
   Litoria flavescens 
   Litoria flavipunctata 
   Litoria freycineti (Wallum rocketfrog) 
   Litoria genimaculata 
   Litoria gilleni 
   Litoria glandulosa 
   Litoria gracilenta 
   Litoria graminea 
   Litoria havina 
   Litoria impura 
   Litoria inermis 
   Litoria infrafrenata 
   Litoria infrafrenata infrafrenata 
   Litoria infrafrenata militaria 
   Litoria iris 
   Litoria javana 
   Litoria jenolanensis 
   Litoria jervisiensis 
   Litoria jeudii 
   Litoria jungguy 
   Litoria krefftii 
   Litoria kumae 
   Litoria latopalmata 
... 
 
Latest Articles on Litoria from uBioRSS
Significant population genetic structuring but a lack of phylogeographic st... - Australian Journal of Zoology
Modelling skin surface areas involved in water transfer in the Palmate Newt... - NRC Research Press: Canadian Journal of Zoology


External Resources:

Did you mean: Litorea ?

Common Names: Australasian Treefrogs



1.  Antioxidant activities of major tryptophyllin L peptides: A joint investigation of Gaussian-based 3D-QSAR and radical scavenging experiments.LinkIT
Tran TTN, Tran DP, Nguyen VC, Tran TDT, Bui TTT, Bowie JH
Journal of peptide science : an official publication of the European Peptide Society J Pept Sci Antioxidant activities of major tryptophyllin L peptides: A joint investigation of Gaussian-based 3D-QSAR and radical scavenging experiments. e3295 10.1002/psc.3295 The red tree frog Litoria rubella from Australia has been studied for several decades showing that their dorsal skin glands secrete a number of small peptides containing a Pro-Trp sequence, known as tryptophyllin L peptides. Although peptides from many genera of Australian frogs have been reported to possess a variety of biological activities, the bioactivities of this peptide family have remained to be discovered. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant potency of a number of tryptophyllin L peptides for the first time using a joint statistical and experimental approach in which predictions based on Gaussian three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models were employed to guide an in vitro experimental investigation. Two tryptophyllin tripeptides P-W-L (OH) and P-W-L (NH2 ) were predicted to have the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values of 0.80 and 0.87 ?M Trolox/?M peptide, respectively. With those promising results, antioxidant capabilities of five tryptophyllin L peptides with the common core Pro-Trp-Leu were synthesized and subjected to 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radical cation (ABTS?+ ) radical scavenging assays. The tests indicated that all the tested tryptophyllin L peptides, noticeably S-P-W-L (OH) and F-P-W-L (NH2 ), are strong ABTS?+ radical scavengers and moderate scavengers in the other two assays. The results, thus, suggested that the tryptophyllin L peptides are likely to be a part of the skin antioxidant system helping the frog to cope with drastic change in oxygen exposure and humidity, as they inhabit over a large area of Australia with a wide climate variation. © 2021 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Tran Thi Thanh Nha TTN https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4792-6540 Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Industrial University of HoChiMinh City, 14 Nguyen Van Bao, Ho Chi Minh, 700000, Vietnam. Tran Dinh Phien DP Department of Chemistry and Environment, Vietnam-Russia Tropical Centre, 63 Nguyen Van Huyen, Nghia Do, Cau Giay, Ha Noi, 11307, Vietnam. Nguyen Van Cuong VC Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Industrial University of HoChiMinh City, 14 Nguyen Van Bao, Ho Chi Minh, 700000, Vietnam. Tran Thi Dieu Thuan TDT Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Industrial University of HoChiMinh City, 14 Nguyen Van Bao, Ho Chi Minh, 700000, Vietnam. Bui Thi Thu Thuy TTT Bowie John Hamilton JH Faculty of Science, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Australia. eng Journal Article 2021 01 06 England J Pept Sci 9506309 1075-2617 IM 3D-QSAR DPPH radical scavenging activity FRAP Gaussian-based CoMSIA model TEAC antioxidants tryptophyllin L peptides 2020 10 15 2020 12 08 2020 12 10 2021 1 7 6 16 2021 1 8 6 0 2021 1 8 6 0 aheadofprint 33410242 10.1002/psc.3295 REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>2.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Physiological and morphological correlates of extreme acid tolerance in larvae of the acidophilic amphibian <b>Litoria</b> cooloolensis.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Meyer EA, Franklin CE, Cramp RL<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of comparative physiology. B, Biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>3.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>In Silico Discovery of Antimicrobial Peptides as an Alternative to Control SARS-CoV-2.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Liscano Y, Oñate-Garzón J, Ocampo-Ibáñez ID<br><font color=gray><i>Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>4.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Connectivity over a disease risk gradient enables recovery of rainforest frogs.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Bell SC, Heard GW, Berger L, Skerratt LF<br><font color=gray><i>Ecological applications : a publication of the Ecological Society of America Ecol Appl Connectivity over a disease risk gradient enables recovery of rainforest frogs. e02152 10.1002/eap.2152 Chytridiomycosis has been a key driver of global frog declines and extinctions, particularly for high-altitude populations across Australia and the Americas. While recent evidence shows some species are recovering, the extent of such recoveries and the mechanisms underpinning them remain poorly resolved. We surveyed the historical latitudinal and elevational range of four Australian rainforest frogs that disappeared from upland sites between 1989 and 1994 to establish their contemporary distribution and elevational limits, and investigate factors affecting population recovery. Five rainforest streams were surveyed from mountain-base to summit (30 sites in total), with swabs collected from the target species (Litoria dayi, L. nannotis, L. rheocola, and L. serrata) to determine their infection status, and data loggers deployed to measure microclimatic variation across the elevational gradient. Infection probability increased with elevation and canopy cover as it was tightly and inversely correlated with stream-side air temperature. Occupancy patterns suggest varying responses to this disease threat gradient. Two species, L. rheocola and L. serrata, were found over their full historical elevational range (?1,000 m above sea level [asl]), while L. dayi was not detected above 400 m (formerly known up to 900 m asl) and L. nannotis was not detected above 800 m (formerly known up to 1,200 m asl). Site occupancy probability was negatively related to predicted infection prevalence for L. dayi, L. nannotis, and L. rheocola, but not L. serrata, which appears to now tolerate high fungal burdens. This study highlights the importance of environmental refuges and connectivity across disease risk gradients for the persistence and natural recovery of frogs susceptible to chytridiomycosis. Likewise, in documenting both interspecific variation in recovery rates and intraspecific differences between sites, this study suggests interactions between disease threats and host selection exist that could be manipulated. For example, translocations may be warranted where connectivity is poor or the increase in disease risk is too steep to allow recolonization, combined with assisted selection or use of founders from populations that have already undergone natural selection. © 2020 by the Ecological Society of America. Bell Sara C SC 0000-0003-1327-0360 College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, 4811, Australia. One Health Research Group, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia. Heard Geoffrey W GW Institute of Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, Albury, New South Wales, 2640, Australia. Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research, Heidelberg, Victoria, 3084, Australia. Berger Lee L One Health Research Group, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia. Skerratt Lee F LF One Health Research Group, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, 3030, Australia. eng FT100100375 Australian Research Council International LP110200240 Australian Research Council International Institute for Land, Water and Society Research Cen Charles Sturt University International Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2020 06 01 United States Ecol Appl 9889808 1051-0761 IM Altitude Animals Anura Australia Chytridiomycota Mycoses Rainforest amphibian chytridiomycosis connectivity disease gradient infection risk prevalence recovery refuge simulation temperature 2019 09 09 2020 02 14 2020 03 30 2020 4 29 6 0 2021 1 22 6 0 2020 4 29 6 0 ppublish 32343856 10.1002/eap.2152 Literature Cited, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>A new species of frog in the <b>Litoria</b> ewingii species group (Anura: Pelodryadidae) from south-eastern Australia.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Mahony M, Moses B, Mahony SV, Lemckert FL, Donnellan S<br><font color=gray><i>Zootaxa, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Meta-transcriptomic identification of Trypanosoma spp. in native wildlife species from Australia.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Ortiz-Baez AS, Cousins K, Eden JS, Chang WS, Harvey E, Pettersson JH, Carver S, Polkinghorne A, ?lapeta J, Rose K, Holmes EC<br><font color=gray><i>Parasites & vectors, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Infection dynamics, dispersal, and adaptation: understanding the lack of recovery in a remnant frog population following a disease outbreak.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>McKnight DT, Carr LJ, Bower DS, Schwarzkopf L, Alford RA, Zenger KR<br><font color=gray><i>Heredity, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Design of new truncated derivatives based on direct and reverse mirror repeats of first six residues of Caerin 4 antimicrobial peptide and evaluation of their activity and cytotoxicity.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Madanchi H, Sardari S, Shajiee H, Taherian S, Ashkar M, Johari B, Shabani AA, Sharafi S<br><font color=gray><i>Chemical biology & drug design Chem Biol Drug Des Design of new truncated derivatives based on direct and reverse mirror repeats of first six residues of Caerin 4 antimicrobial peptide and evaluation of their activity and cytotoxicity. 801-811 10.1111/cbdd.13689 Caerin 4 is a family of AMPs isolated from the frog called Litoria caerulea. In silico drug designing methods and using machine learning algorithms for AMPs design can reduce their usage restrictions such as production costs and the time required for investigation of their activity and toxicity. In this study, two short peptides were designed based on direct and reverse mirror repeats of GLWQKI conserved sequence from Caerin 4 family that called dCar12 and rCar12. Also, Caerin 4.1 was synthesized without primary GLWQKI sequence and named Car7-23 . Following the synthesis of peptides, their antimicrobial properties, cytotoxicity, secondary structure, and mode of action were further evaluated. Results indicated that rCar12 had a good antibacterial activity (at an MIC of 3.9-62.5 µg/ml), while Car7-23 did not have any antimicrobial properties. Cytotoxicity of rCar12 at MICs range was <5%, which is much less than Caerin 4.1. In conclusion, rCar12 with reverse mirror repeat has different functional properties compared with dCar12. These results corroborate the fact that in two peptides with identical residues and length, the position and arrangement of amino acids are very important concerning peptide function. Moreover, GLWQKI sequence is highly crucial for the antimicrobial activity of Caerin 4 antimicrobial peptide family. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Madanchi Hamid H https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6527-7321 Department of Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran. Drug Design and Bioinformatics Unit, Department of Medical Biotechnology, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran. Sardari Soroush S Drug Design and Bioinformatics Unit, Department of Medical Biotechnology, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran. Shajiee Hooman H Damghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran. Taherian Sina S Damghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran. Ashkar Maryam M Damghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran. Johari Behrooz B Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran. Shabani Ali Akbar AA Department of Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran. Sharafi Shahram S Damghan Branch, Department of Biology, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran. eng Journal Article 2020 04 19 England Chem Biol Drug Des 101262549 1747-0277 IM Litoria caerulea antimicrobial peptide caerin in silico drug design machine learning algorithm 2019 10 20 2020 03 03 2020 03 14 2020 4 8 6 0 2020 4 8 6 0 2020 4 8 6 0 ppublish 32259385 10.1111/cbdd.13689 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Host-Defense Peptides Caerin 1.1 and 1.9 Stimulate TNF-Alpha-Dependent Apoptotic Signals in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Ni G, Chen S, Chen M, Wu J, Yang B, Yuan J, Walton SF, Li H, Wei MQ, Wang Y, Chen G, Liu X, Wang T<br><font color=gray><i>Frontiers in cell and developmental biology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Atypical Brucella sp in captive Australian green tree frogs (<b>Litoria</b> caerulea): clinical features, pathology, culture and molecular characterization.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Latheef S, Keyburn A, Broz I, Bagnara A, Bayley C, Frith S, Dobson EC<br><font color=gray><i>Australian veterinary journal Aust Vet J Atypical Brucella sp in captive Australian green tree frogs (Litoria caerulea): clinical features, pathology, culture and molecular characterization. 216-221 10.1111/avj.12925 Brucella spp. are globally important zoonotic bacteria, which have historically been considered pathogens of warm-blooded species. More recently, new strains of Brucella have been cultured from a broader range of animals including terrestrial and marine mammals and amphibians. These new isolates are classified as 'atypical' brucellae and differ from the classical stains by host tropism, phenotypic traits or phylogenetic distance. Atypical Brucella have previously been described as the cause of localised and systemic infection in frogs. This report describes the clinical features, pathology, microbiology and molecular characteristics of persistent Brucella spp. infection in two Australian green tree frogs and its isolation in an additional in-contact, clinically well frog. The two frogs that died had severe nephritis attributed to brucellosis with disseminated infection identified in one animal. © 2020 Australian Veterinary Association. Latheef S S Gribbles Veterinary Pathology, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia. Keyburn A A CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Division of Livestock Industries, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia. Broz I I CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Division of Livestock Industries, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia. Bagnara A A CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Division of Livestock Industries, Geelong, Victoria, 3220, Australia. Bayley C C Gribbles Veterinary Pathology, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia. Frith S S Melbourne Zoo, Parkville, Victoria, 3052, Australia. Dobson E C EC Gribbles Veterinary Pathology, Clayton, Victoria, 3168, Australia. eng Case Reports 2020 03 09 England Aust Vet J 0370616 0005-0423 0 DNA, Bacterial IM Animals Australia Brucella genetics Brucellosis veterinary DNA, Bacterial Phylogeny atypical Brucella green tree frog histopathology microbiology molecular biology 2019 10 16 2020 01 12 2020 01 14 2020 3 11 6 0 2020 7 2 6 0 2020 3 11 6 0 ppublish 32153019 10.1111/avj.12925 References, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Litoria&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>