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Synonyms:
   Leontopithecus rosalia (golden lion tamarin) 

Broader Terms:
   Leontopithecus (Lion Tamarins) 
 
 
Latest Articles on Leontopithecus rosalia Linnaeus 1766 from uBioRSS
Fertility control to mitigate human–wildlife conflicts: a review - Wildlife Research
Lion Tamarins versus Climate Change - CBD News Headlines


External Resources:

Common Names: Singe-lion, Sauí-piranga, golden lion tamarin, Tamarin soyeux, Mico-leão-dourado



1.  The mitochondrial genome and Epigenome of the Golden lion Tamarin from fecal DNA using Nanopore adaptive sequencing.LinkIT
Wanner N, Larsen PA, McLain A, Faulk C
BMC genomics, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Repetitive Sequence Distribution on Saguinus, Leontocebus and Leontopithecus Tamarins (Platyrrhine, Primates) by Mapping Telomeric (TTAGGG) Motifs and rDNA Loci.LinkIT
Ceraulo S, Perelman PL, Mazzoleni S, Rovatsos M, Dumas F
Biology, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Intergroup food transfers in wild golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia).LinkIT
Troisi CA
Primates; journal of primatology, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  The role of food transfers in wild golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia): Support for the informational and nutritional hypothesis.LinkIT
Troisi CA, Hoppitt WJE, Ruiz-Miranda CR, Laland KN
Primates; journal of primatology, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Pterygodermatites nycticebi infections in golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia rosalia) and aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) from a German zoo.LinkIT
Silva LMR, Voelker I, Geiger C, Schauerte N, Hirzmann J, Bauer C, Taubert A, Hermosilla C
Zoo biologyZoo BiolPterygodermatites nycticebi infections in golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia rosalia) and aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) from a German zoo.59-6410.1002/zoo.21578In a golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia rosalia) colony kept indoors in a German zoo, two animals presented a sudden onset of reduced general condition, lethargy, and diarrhea. At animal capture for clinical examination, adult nematode stages were observed after stress-induced defecation. Despite treatment, two golden lion tamarins died in the following 2 days. At necropsy, spirurid stages were found in the lungs and intestine. Additionally, adult Pterygodermatites spp. were identified in histopathological samples of intestine and pancreas, confirming the previous diagnosis. Upon diagnosis, all animals were treated with ivermectin (0.2?mg/kg; SC). Thereafter, the general condition of the golden lion tamarins improved, whereby some of them excreted spirurid nematodes over 3 days. Four weeks after treatment, 20 fecal samples from the colony were examined and proved negative for parasitic stages. Given that common German cockroaches (Blattella germanica) are suitable intermediate hosts of Pterygodermatites nycticebi, 30 specimens were collected from seven different locations around the golden lion tamarins housing. Third-stage larvae of Pterygodermatites spp. were recovered from those cockroaches. Regular anthelmintic treatments, coprological screenings, and controls for intermediate hosts were recommended. More than 2 years later, P. nycticebi infection was diagnosed again histopathologically in an aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) which suddenly died. Coprological analysis confirmed the presence of spirurid eggs. Due to prosimian primates' cockroach-eating habits and given that total cockroach eradication proved impossible, continuous cockroach control strategies and regular treatments of primates are currently performed to prevent further P. nycticebi infections.© 2020 The Authors. Zoo Biology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.SilvaLiliana M RLMRhttp://orcid.org/0000-0002-2217-9983Institute of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.VoelkerIrisIDepartment of Veterinary Medicine, Pathology and Parasitology Diagnostic, Landesbetrieb Hessisches Landeslabor, Giessen, Germany.GeigerChristinaCZoo Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.SchauerteNicoleNZoo Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.HirzmannJoergJInstitute of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.BauerChristianCInstitute of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.TaubertAnjaAInstitute of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.HermosillaCarlosCInstitute of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany.engJournal Article20201102United StatesZoo Biol88078370733-31880Antiparasitic Agents70288-86-7IvermectinLeontopithecus rosaliaIMAnimalsAnimals, ZooAntiparasitic Agentstherapeutic useBlattellidaeparasitologyFecesparasitologyFemaleGermanyInsect ControlIvermectintherapeutic useLeontopithecusparasitologyMaleMonkey Diseasesdrug therapymortalityparasitologyprevention & controlRhabditidagrowth & developmentisolation & purificationRhabditida Infectionsdrug therapymortalityprevention & controlveterinaryStrepsirhiniparasitologyBlattella germanicacockroachintermediate hostprosimian primatepterygodermatitosis2020050620200813202010072020113602021224602020112624ppublish3313517210.1002/zoo.21578REFERENCES, 2021</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Social contributions to the foraging behavior of young wild golden lion tamarins (Leontopithecus rosalia): Age-related changes and partner preferences.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Rapaport LG<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of primatology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Habitat determinants of golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) occupancy of cacao agroforests: Gloomy conservation prospects for management intensification.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>de Almeida-Rocha JM, Peres CA, Monsalvo JAB, Oliveira LC<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of primatologyAm J PrimatolHabitat determinants of golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) occupancy of cacao agroforests: Gloomy conservation prospects for management intensification.e2317910.1002/ajp.23179Organismal distributions in human-modified landscapes largely depend on the capacity of any given species to adapt to changes in habitat structure and quality. The golden-headed lion tamarin (GHLT; Leontopithecus chrysomelas) is an Endangered primate from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest whose remaining populations occupy heterogeneous landscapes consisting primarily of shade cacao (Theobroma cacao) agroforestry, locally known as cabrucas. This cash crop can coexist with high densities of native tree species and holds a significant proportion of the native fauna, but its widely extolled wildlife-friendly status is increasingly threatened by management intensification. Although this potentially threatens to reduce the distribution of GHLTs, the main determinants of tamarin's occupancy of cabrucas remain unknown, thereby limiting our ability to design and implement appropriate conservation practices. We surveyed 16 cabruca patches in southern Bahia, Brazil, and used occupancy modeling to identify the best predictors of GHLT patch occupancy. Key explanatory variables included vegetation structure, critical resources, landscape context, human disturbance, and predation pressure. We found a negative relationship between GHLT occupancy and the prevalence of jackfruit trees (Artocarpus heterophylus), which is likely associated with the low representation of other key food species for GHLTs. Conversely, cabrucas retaining large-diameter canopy trees have a higher probability of GHLT occupancy, likely because these trees provide preferred sleeping sites. Thus, key large tree resources (food and shelter) are currently the main drivers of GHLT occupancy within cabruca agroecosystems. Since both factors can be directly affected by crop management practices, intensification of cabrucas may induce significant habitat impacts on GHLT populations over much of their remaining range-wide distribution.© 2020 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC.de Almeida-RochaJuliana MJM0000-0002-2968-5504Departamento de Ecologia, Applied Ecology and Conservation Lab, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Conservação da Biodiversidade, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK.PeresCarlos ACA0000-0002-1588-8765Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK.Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil.MonsalvoJulio A BJAB0000-0001-9692-2533Departamento de Ecologia, Laboratório de Ecologia e Conservação de Aves, Programa de Pós-graduação em Ecologia, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, Distrito Federal, Brazil.OliveiraLeonardo De CLC0000-0002-1774-0713Departamento de Ecologia, Applied Ecology and Conservation Lab, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Conservação da Biodiversidade, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.Departamento de Ciências, Faculdade de Formação de Professores, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, São Gonçalo, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Bicho do Mato Instituto de Pesquisa, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.engJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20200724United StatesAm J Primatol81089490275-2565Leontopithecus rosaliaIMAnimalsBrazilCacaoConservation of Natural ResourcesCrop ProductionmethodsEcosystemLeontopithecusPredatory BehaviorTreesAtlantic forestCallitrichidaeagricultureland?sharingpredators2019072220200626202007032021115844202111660202151460ppublish3344846510.1002/ajp.23179REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Behavioral Implications of Enrichment for Golden Lion Tamarins: A Tool for <i>Ex Situ</i> Conservation.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Sanders K, Fernandez EJ<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of applied animal welfare science : JAAWS, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Host range and susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive neotropical and Old-world primates.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Paula NF, Dutra KS, Oliveira AR, Santos DOD, Rocha CEV, Vitor RWA, Tinoco HP, Costa MELTD, Paixão TAD, Santos RL<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of medical primatologyJ Med PrimatolHost range and susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive neotropical and Old-world primates.202-21010.1111/jmp.12470Toxoplasmosis is an important disease affecting captive non-human primates. The goal of this study was to assess the seroprevalence and pathological findings of toxoplasmosis in different species of captive primates.Six captive neotropical primates died naturally due to Toxoplasma gondii infection and were necropsied. Tissue samples were evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Serum samples from 57 captive neotropical and Old-world primates housed at the Belo Horizonte zoological garden were analyzed by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA).Neotropical primates had lesions compatible with toxoplasmosis with immunolabeled intralesional T gondii. All Old-World primates (10/10), but only three neotropical primates (3/47), all belonging to the Sapajus apella species (3/6), were serologically positive.Our results suggest a higher susceptibility of neotropical primates to toxoplasmosis. However, this study also supports the hypothesis that Sapajus apella may be naturally resistant.© 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.PaulaNayara Ferreira deNF0000-0002-2506-1163Departamento de Clínica e Cirurgia Veterinárias, Escola de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.DutraKateanne SilvaKS0000-0002-8337-5363Departamento de Clínica e Cirurgia Veterinárias, Escola de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.OliveiraAyisa Rodrigues deAR0000-0002-9031-792XDepartamento de Clínica e Cirurgia Veterinárias, Escola de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.SantosDaniel Oliveira DosDOD0000-0002-3083-1572Departamento de Clínica e Cirurgia Veterinárias, Escola de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.RochaCláudia Emanuela VianaCEV0000-0002-3857-2122Departamento de Patologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.VitorRicardo Wagner de AlmeidaRWA0000-0002-8599-0474Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.TinocoHerlandes PenhaHP0000-0003-4270-5503Fundação de Parques Municipais e Zoobotânica de Belo Horizonte, Hospital Veterinário, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.CostaMaria Elvira Loyola Teixeira daMELTDFundação de Parques Municipais e Zoobotânica de Belo Horizonte, Hospital Veterinário, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.PaixãoTatiane Alves daTAD0000-0001-8284-9902Departamento de Patologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.SantosRenato LimaRL0000-0002-4830-0470Departamento de Clínica e Cirurgia Veterinárias, Escola de Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.engCase ReportsJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20200520DenmarkJ Med Primatol03206260047-2565Callicebus nigrifronsLeontopithecus rosaliaIMAnimalsAnimals, ZooAotus trivirgatusBrazilFatal OutcomeFemaleHost SpecificityLeontopithecusMaleMonkey DiseasesPitheciidaeToxoplasmaphysiologyToxoplasmosis, AnimaldiagnosisparasitologyToxoplasma gondiienzyme-linked immunosorbent assayhistopathologyimmunohistochemistryindirect fluorescent antibody testindirect hemagglutination assaymonkeys201908082020032120200420202052260202172360202052260ppublish3243621910.1111/jmp.12470REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Semen cryopreservation in golden-headed lion tamarin, Leontopithecus chrysomelas.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Arakaki PR, Salgado PAB, Losano JDA, Gonçalves DR, Valle RDRD, Pereira RJG, Nichi M<br><font color=gray><i>American journal of primatologyAm J PrimatolSemen cryopreservation in golden-headed lion tamarin, Leontopithecus chrysomelas.e2307110.1002/ajp.23071Wild animal genetic resource banking (GRB) represents a valuable tool in conservation breeding programs, particularly in cases involving endangered species such as the golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas). Thus, we aimed to assess a sperm freezing protocol for golden-headed lion tamarins using two different exenders: BotuBOV® (BB) and Test Yolk Buffer® (TYB). Ejaculates were collected by penile vibrostimulation from animals housed at São Paulo Zoological Park Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil, and after immediate analysis, two aliquots were diluted in BB and TYB. Postthawing samples were evaluated for total and progressive motility, plasma membrane and acrosome integrities, mitochondrial activity, susceptibility to oxidative stress, and sperm-egg-binding. No differences between BB and TYB were found for most seminal parameters, except for acrosome integrity and susceptibility to oxidative stress (in both cases BB showed higher values). However, in spite of these differences and regardless of the extender used, postthaw sperm motility and viability with the described protocol were encouraging (on average >50% and >80%, respectively), indicating that sperm cryopreservation may be a short-term measure for the conservation of golden-headed lion tamarins.© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.ArakakiPaloma RochaPR0000-0002-7153-2421Department of Animal Reproduction, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.SalgadoPaula Andrea BorgesPABAssisted Reproduction Unit, Applied Research Department, São Paulo Zoological Park Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil.LosanoJoão Diego de AgostiniJDADepartment of Animal Reproduction, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.GonçalvesDébora RodriguesDRAssisted Reproduction Unit, Applied Research Department, São Paulo Zoological Park Foundation, São Paulo, Brazil.ValleRodrigo Del Rio doRDRDInstitute of Health Sciences, Paulista University, São Paulo, Brazil.PereiraRicardo José GarciaRJGDepartment of Animal Reproduction, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.NichiMarcilioMDepartment of Animal Reproduction, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.engFinance Code 001Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior-BrasilInternationalJournal ArticleResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't20191201United StatesAm J Primatol81089490275-2565Leontopithecus rosaliaIMAnimalsAnimals, ZoophysiologyConservation of Natural ResourcesCryopreservationveterinaryEndangered SpeciesLeontopithecusphysiologyMaleSemen PreservationveterinaryCallitrichidaeassisted reproductive technologyneotropical primatessemen extenderssperm freezing201909062019103120191111201912460202062060201912360ppublish3178881810.1002/ajp.23071REFERENCES, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Leontopithecus+rosalia+Linnaeus+1766&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Leontopithecus+rosalia+Linnaeus+1766&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Leontopithecus+rosalia+Linnaeus+1766&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Leontopithecus+rosalia+Linnaeus+1766&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png 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