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Synonyms:
   Ichthyosaura 

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   Unassigned 
 
 


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1.  Repeatability and heritability of resting metabolic rate in a long-lived amphibian.LinkIT
Ba?kiera S, Gvo?dík L
Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular & integrative physiology, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Phylotranscriptomic evidence for pervasive ancient hybridization among Old World salamanders.LinkIT
Rancilhac L, Irisarri I, Angelini C, Arntzen JW, Babik W, Bossuyt F, Künzel S, Lüddecke T, Pasmans F, Sanchez E, Weisrock D, Veith M, Wielstra B, Steinfartz S, Hofreiter M, Philippe H, Vences M
Molecular phylogenetics and evolution, 2021
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Ontogenetic plasticity in cranial morphology is associated with a change in the food processing behavior in Alpine newts.LinkIT
Schwarz D, Konow N, Porro LB, Heiss E
Frontiers in zoology, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Host contribution to parasite persistence is consistent between parasites and over time, but varies spatially.LinkIT
Bielby J, Price SJ, Monsalve-CarcaÑo C, Bosch J
Ecological applications : a publication of the Ecological Society of America Ecol Appl Host contribution to parasite persistence is consistent between parasites and over time, but varies spatially. e02256 10.1002/eap.2256 Most parasites and pathogens infect multiple hosts, but a great deal of variation exists in the role of those hosts in persistence of infection. Understanding which hosts are most important in maintaining parasites can provide a clearer target for infection control. Recently developed empirical and theoretical approaches provide a way to quantify the relative contribution of hosts within a community and place them in a multi-host framework to better direct control efforts. Amphibians provide a framework for better understanding multi-host-multi-parasite dynamics. Two well-studied amphibian parasites, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and Ranavirus, infect multiple host species and exhibit a great deal of heterogeneity in how they affect hosts. We used these two parasites and a community of five amphibian species to investigate the relative importance of hosts in parasite persistence, and how any patterns varied spatially and temporally. At two sites (Lake Ercina and Lake Lloroza in the Picos de Europa National Park, Spain) we collected data on the prevalence and shedding rate of parasite infection for both Bd and Ranavirus, and the abundance of each species' life stages. We used these data to parameterize a recently developed modeling framework, which was used to quantify the relative contribution of each host to the community reproductive number, R0 . By comparing each host-category over time and between sites we were able to identify consistencies in which host was responsible for the maintenance of these two parasites. Within a site one species consistently contributed the most to the persistence of both parasites. This consistency did not transfer between sites, the maintenance host species being different for each. At one site (Ercina), life stages of the common midwife toad, Alytes obstetricans, acted as the maintenance host for both Bd and Ranavirus. In contrast, at the second site, Lloroza, the alpine newt, Ichthyosaura alpestris, fulfilled that role. A single host species was responsible for infection persistence of both parasites at each lake. Attempts to control the infection levels and impacts of multiple parasites can benefit from a community epidemiology approach, and provide clarity on which hosts are the foci of mitigation efforts. However, at a small spatial scale, the target host may vary according to the physical qualities of those sites and the demographics of the host community. © 2020 by the Ecological Society of America. Bielby Jon J School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, James Parsons Building, Byrom Street, Liverpool, L3 3AF, United Kingdom. Price Stephen J SJ https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6983-6250 UCL Genetics Institute, Darwin Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom. Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regents Park, London, NW1 4RY, United Kingdom. Monsalve-CarcaÑo Camino C Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, Madrid, 28006, Spain. Bosch Jaime J https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0099-7934 Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, Madrid, 28006, Spain. Research Unit of Biodiversity (CSIC, UO, PA), Oviedo University-Campus Mieres, Mieres, Spain. eng CGL2015-70070-R MICINN grant Journal Article 2020 11 09 United States Ecol Appl 9889808 1051-0761 IM R0 Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) Picos de Europa National Park amphibian epidemiology multi-host pathogen ranavirus 2020 01 30 2020 06 11 2020 08 16 2020 11 10 6 0 2020 11 10 6 0 2020 11 9 5 38 aheadofprint 33164249 10.1002/eap.2256 Literature Cited, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>5.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Instant killing of pathogenic chytrid fungi by disposable nitrile gloves prevents disease transmission between amphibians.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Thomas V, Van Rooij P, Meerpoel C, Stegen G, Wauters J, Vanhaecke L, Martel A, Pasmans F<br><font color=gray><i>PloS one, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Quantifying the burden of managing wildlife diseases in multiple host species.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Canessa S, Bozzuto C, Pasmans F, Martel A<br><font color=gray><i>Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Conserv Biol Quantifying the burden of managing wildlife diseases in multiple host species. 1131-1140 10.1111/cobi.13313 Mitigation of infectious wildlife diseases is especially challenging where pathogens affect communities of multiple host species. Although most ecological studies recognize the challenge posed by multiple-species pathogens, the implications for management are typically assessed only qualitatively. Translating the intuitive understanding that multiple host species are important into practice requires a quantitative assessment of whether and how secondary host species should also be targeted by management and the effort this will require. Using a multiple-species compartmental model, we determined analytically whether and how intensively secondary host species should be managed to prevent outbreaks in focal hosts based on the reproduction number of individual host species and between-species transmission rates. We applied the model to the invasive pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans in a 2-host system in northern Europe. Avoiding a disease outbreak in the focal host (fire salamanders [Salamandra salamandra]) was impossible unless management also heavily targeted the secondary host (alpine newts [Ichthyosaura alpestris]). Preventing an outbreak in the community required targeted removal of at least 80% of each species. This proportion increased to 90% in the presence of an environmental reservoir of B. salamandrivorans and when the proportion of individuals removed could not be adjusted for different host species (e.g., when using traps that are not species specific). We recommend the focus of disease-mitigation plans should shift from focal species to the community level and calculate explicitly the management efforts required on secondary host species to move beyond the simple intuitive understanding that multiple host species may all influence the system. Failure to do so may lead to underestimating the magnitude of the effort required and ultimately to suboptimal or futile management attempts. © 2019 Society for Conservation Biology. Canessa Stefano S 0000-0002-0932-826X Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820, Merelbeke, Belgium. Bozzuto Claudio C Wildlife Analysis GmbH, Oetlisbergstrasse 38, 8053, Zurich, Switzerland. Pasmans Frank F Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820, Merelbeke, Belgium. Martel An A Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820, Merelbeke, Belgium. eng Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2019 04 03 United States Conserv Biol 9882301 0888-8892 IM Animals Animals, Wild Chytridiomycota Conservation of Natural Resources Europe Urodela Cuantificación de la Carga que Representa el Manejo de Enfermedades de Fauna Silvestre en Múltiples Especies Hospederas Resumen La mitigación de enfermedades infecciosas en fauna silvestre representa un reto especial cuando los patógenos afectan a comunidades de múltiples especies hospederas. Aunque la mayoría de los estudios ecológicos reconocen el reto que plantean los patógenos de múltiples especies, las implicaciones para el manejo comúnmente sólo se evalúan en el aspecto cualitativo. La traducción del entendimiento intuitivo hacia la práctica de que las múltiples especies hospederas son importantes requiere una valoración cuantitativa sobre si y cuán intensivamente se deberían considerar en el manejo las especies hospederas secundarias y los esfuerzos que esto requerirá. Determinamos analíticamente con un modelo compartimentado de múltiples especies si y cuán intensivamente se deberían manejar las especies hospederas secundarias para prevenir brotes en los hospederos focales con base en el número de reproducción de las especies hospederas individuales y en las tasas de transmisión entre especies. Aplicamos el modelo al hongo patógeno invasivo Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans en un sistema de dos hospederos al norte de Europa. Fue imposible evitar un brote de enfermedad en el hospedero focal (la salamandra de fuego [Salamandra salamandra]) a menos que el manejo también se enfocara considerablemente en el hospedero secundario (el tritón alpino [Ichthyosaura alpestris]). Para prevenir un brote dentro de la comunidad se requirió de la extirpación de al menos el 80% de cada especie. Esta proporción incrementó al 90% con la presencia de un reservorio ambiental de B. salamandrivorans y cuando la proporción de individuos removidos no pudo ajustarse para diferentes especies (p. ej.: el uso de trampas que nos son específicas para una especie) Recomendamos que el foco de los planes para la mitigación de enfermedades cambie de una especie focal al nivel de comunidad y que calculen explícitamente los esfuerzos de manejo requeridos sobre las especies hospederas secundarias para avanzar más allá del simple entendimiento intuitivo de que múltiples especies hospederas pueden todas influir sobre el sistema. Si se falla en esto, se podría subestimar la magnitud del esfuerzo requerido y finalmente podría resultar en intentos de manejo sub-óptimos o inútiles. análisis de sensibilidad basic reproduction number chytrid decision making epidemiology epidemiología epizootic epizoótico matriz de siguiente generación next-generation matrix número básico de reproducción quitridio salamanders salamandras sensitivity analysis toma de decisiones transmission 2018 09 26 2018 12 20 2019 01 24 2019 3 15 6 0 2019 12 18 6 0 2019 3 15 6 0 ppublish 30868671 10.1111/cobi.13313 Literature cited, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Underwater sound production varies within not between species in sympatric newts.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Hubá?ek J, ?ugerková M, Gvo?dík L<br><font color=gray><i>PeerJ, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Repeatability of thermal reaction norms for spontaneous locomotor activity in juvenile newts.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Ba?kiera S, Gvo?dík L<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of thermal biology, 2019</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Context-dependent dispersal, public information, and heterospecific attraction in newts.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Cayuela H, Grolet O, Joly P<br><font color=gray><i>Oecologia, 2018</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>No trade-offs in interspecific interference ability and predation susceptibility in newt larvae.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Hlou?ková M, Balogová M, Kr?áková V, Gvo?dík L<br><font color=gray><i>Ecology and evolution, 2018</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Ichthyosaura+Latreille+1801&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a 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