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Synonyms:
   Daphnia pulex 

Broader Terms:
   Daphnia 
   Diplostraca 

More Specific:
   Daphnia pulex aspina 
   Daphnia pulex obtusa 
 
 
Latest Articles on Daphnia pulex from uBioRSS


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1.  Nitrate-N-mediated toxicological responses of Scenedesmus acutus and Daphnia pulex to cadmium, arsenic and their binary mixture (Cd/Asmix) at environmentally relevant concentrations.LinkIT
Awoyemi OM, Subbiah S, Velazquez A, Thompson KN, Peace AL, Mayer GD
Journal of hazardous materials, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

2.  Breaking ecological barriers: Anthropogenic disturbance leads to habitat transitions, hybridization, and high genetic diversity.LinkIT
Millette KL, Gonzalez A, Cristescu ME
The Science of the total environment, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

3.  Metal exposure causes rDNA copy number to fluctuate in mutation accumulation lines of Daphnia pulex.LinkIT
Harvey EF, Cristescu ME, Dale J, Hunter H, Randall C, Crease TJ
Aquatic toxicology (Amsterdam, Netherlands), 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

4.  Adaptive divergence of meiotic recombination rate in ecological speciation.LinkIT
Neupane S, Xu S
Genome biology and evolution, 2020
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0

5.  Foraging strategy mediates ectotherm predator-prey responses to climate warming.LinkIT
Twardochleb LA, Treakle TC, Zarnetske PL
Ecology Ecology Foraging strategy mediates ectotherm predator-prey responses to climate warming. e03146 10.1002/ecy.3146 Climate warming and species traits interact to influence predator performance, including individual feeding and growth rates. However, the effects of an important trait-predator foraging strategy-are largely unknown. We investigated the interactions between predator foraging strategy and temperature on two ectotherm predators: an active predator, the backswimmer Notonecta undulata, and a sit-and-wait predator, the damselfly Enallagma annexum. In a series of predator-prey experiments across a temperature gradient, we measured predator feeding rates on an active prey species, zooplankton Daphnia pulex, predator growth rates, and mechanisms that influence predator feeding: body speed of predators and prey (here measured as swimming speed), prey encounter rates, capture success, attack rates, and handling time. Overall, warming led to increased feeding rates for both predators through changes to each component of the predator's functional response. We found that prey swimming speed strongly increased with temperature. The active predator's swimming speed also increased with temperature, and together, the increase in predator and prey swimming speed resulted in twofold higher prey encounter rates for the active predator at warmer temperatures. By contrast, prey encounter rates of the sit-and-wait predator increased fourfold with rising temperatures as a result of increased prey swimming speed. Concurrently, increased prey swimming speed was associated with a decline in the active predator's capture success at high temperatures, whereas the sit-and-wait predator's capture success slightly increased with temperature. We provide some of the first evidence that foraging traits mediate the indirect effects of warming on predator performance. Understanding how traits influence species' responses to warming could clarify how climate change will affect entire functional groups of species. © 2020 by the Ecological Society of America. Twardochleb Laura A LA https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8804-9399 Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824, USA. Program in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824, USA. Treakle Tyler C TC Department of Biology, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, 23187, USA. Zarnetske Phoebe L PL https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6257-6951 Program in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824, USA. Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824, USA. eng 1010055 National Institute of Food and Agriculture Journal Article 2020 07 29 United States Ecology 0043541 0012-9658 IM Holling Type 2 functional response climate change freshwater food web functional traits hunting mode metabolic theory of ecology predation 2019 08 02 2020 04 29 2020 06 08 2020 7 30 6 0 2020 7 30 6 0 2020 7 30 6 0 aheadofprint 32726861 10.1002/ecy.3146 Literature Cited, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>6.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Methyl farnesoate regulatory mechanisms underlying photoperiod-dependent sex determination in the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Toyota K, Sato T, Iguchi T, Ohira T<br><font color=gray><i>Journal of applied toxicology : JAT J Appl Toxicol Methyl farnesoate regulatory mechanisms underlying photoperiod-dependent sex determination in the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna. 10.1002/jat.4035 Freshwater zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used in ecotoxicology studies. During the last 20 years, it has been demonstrated that the topical application of juvenile hormone (JH) or JH analogs to mother daphnids induce male offspring production. Based on this finding, an in vivo screening validation method for chemicals with JH agonistic effect has developed. Although this screening system successfully identified a number of JH-like chemicals, molecular mechanisms underlying the male sex-determining process remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we established a reliable male- or female-producing system using Daphnia pulex WTN6 strain by changing the rearing photoperiod. Taking advantage of this rearing system, we successfully found several factors involving male sex determination such as ionotropic glutamate receptors, protein kinase C and pantothenate. Here, we used two D. magna strains that can also control the production of female or male offspring by photoperiod differences as model species for ecotoxicology studies. We demonstrated that either treatment of antagonist of ionotropic glutamate receptors or inhibitor of protein kinase C strongly suppressed male offspring production even under male-producing conditions. Moreover, we revealed that male sex-determining processes are likely diverged between D. magna and D. pulex based on the current experiment. This study provides a fine experimental method for in vivo screening not only JH agonists but also JH antagonists. Moreover, using daphnids with photoperiod-dependent sex determination manner will hugely contribute to understanding the mode-of-action of JH in daphnids. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Toyota Kenji K https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8411-1389 Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kanagawa University, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa, Japan. Department of Biological Science and Technology, Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Sato Tomomi T Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. Iguchi Taisen T https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6020-0704 Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. Ohira Tsuyoshi T Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kanagawa University, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa, Japan. eng Journal Article 2020 07 13 England J Appl Toxicol 8109495 0260-437X IM Daphnia magna ionotropic glutamate receptor methyl farnesoate photoperiod-dependent sex determination protein kinase C 2020 04 16 2020 06 06 2020 06 22 2020 7 15 6 0 2020 7 15 6 0 2020 7 15 6 0 aheadofprint 32662114 10.1002/jat.4035 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>7.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Priority of Carl Linnaeus as the author of the oldest species of Cladocera (Crustacea: Branchiopoda): <b>Daphnia pulex</b> (Linnaeus, 1758) and Polyphemus pediculus (Linnaeus, 1758).</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Kotov AA<br><font color=gray><i>Zootaxa, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>8.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Alternative splicing is highly variable among <b>Daphnia pulex</b> lineages in response to acute copper exposure.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Suresh S, Crease TJ, Cristescu ME, Chain FJJ<br><font color=gray><i>BMC genomics, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>9.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Embryogenesis plasticity and the transmission of maternal effects in <b>Daphnia pulex</b>.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Hasoon MSR, Plaistow SJ<br><font color=gray><i>Evolution & development Evol Dev Embryogenesis plasticity and the transmission of maternal effects in Daphnia pulex. 10.1111/ede.12346 Understanding how genetic, nongenetic, and environmental cues are integrated during development may be critical in understanding if, and how, organisms will respond to rapid environmental change. Normally, only post-embryonic studies are possible. But in this study, we developed a real-time, high-throughput confocal microscope assay that allowed us to link Daphnia embryogenesis to offspring life history variation at the individual level. Our assay identified eight clear developmental phenotypes linked by seven developmental stages, the duration of which were correlated with the expression of specific offspring life history traits. Daphnia embryogenesis varied not only between clones reared in the same environment, but also within a single clone when mothers were of different ages or reared in different food environments. Our results support the hypothesis that Daphnia embryogenesis is plastic and can be altered by changes in maternal state or maternal environment. As well as furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning parental effects, our assay may also have an industrial application if it can be used as a rapid ecotoxicological prescreen for testing the effect that pollutant doses have on offspring life histories traditionally assayed with a 21-day Daphnia reproduction test. © 2020 The Authors. Evolution & Development published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. Hasoon Megan S R MSR Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK. Plaistow Stewart J SJ http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9003-6271 Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. eng NE/I024437/1 Natural Environment Research Council NE/N016017/1 Natural Environment Research Council Journal Article 2020 06 24 United States Evol Dev 100883432 1520-541X IM 2020 6 25 6 0 2020 6 25 6 0 2020 6 25 6 0 aheadofprint 32579775 10.1111/ede.12346 REFERENCES, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br>10.  <a href=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0 class=title>Expression and functional analysis of the Akt gene from <b>Daphnia pulex</b>.</a><a href=http://ubio.org/tools/linkit.php?map%5B%5D=all&link_type=2&url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0><img src=linkit.png border=0 title='LinkIT' alt='LinkIT'></a> <br><span class=j>Zhou X, Cheng S, Zhao C, Lin C, Wang D, Zhao Y<br><font color=gray><i>Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part B, Biochemistry & molecular biology, 2020</i></font><br><font color=#008000>http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=0<br></font></span><br><br><br><table cellspacing=0 cellpadding=0 align=center><tr valign=bottom><td align=center><img src=p.png border=0></td><td align=center><img src=o_red.png border=0></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10><img src=o_yellow.png border=0></a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2><img src=rtal.png border=0></a></td></tr><td align=center></td><td align=center>1</td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>2</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=3>3</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=4>4</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=5>5</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=6>6</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=7>7</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=8>8</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=9>9</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=10>10</a></td><td align=center><a href=http://ubio.org/portal/index.php?search=Daphnia+pulex&category=l&client=pubmed&startPage=2>»</a></td></tr></table></table></tr></table></td><script src="http://www.google-analytics.com/urchin.js" type="text/javascript"> </script> <script type="text/javascript"> _uacct = "UA-634822-1"; urchinTracker(); </script> </BODY> </HTML>